Where To Buy Doubleback Wine Near Me? (Solved)

Where is Doubleback Winery located?

  • Doubleback Winery is a Washington wine producer located in Walla Walla Valley, owned by former NFL quarterback Drew Bledsoe. It focuses on Bordeaux-style wines – particularly Cabernet Sauvignon – and has a portfolio of esta It’s the world’s most popular grape, but which Cabernet Sauvignon is the world searching for?

Is Doubleback wine good?

This gorgeous, full-bodied effort has a wonderful sense of purity and balance as well as classic notes of cassis, blueberries, graphite, charcoal, chocolate, and lead pencil shavings. It’s one of the top wines in the vintage and will keep for 20-25 years or more.

Who makes Doubleback wine?

Doubleback | David Bowler Wine.

Who owns Doubleback winery?

Upon his retirement from the NFL in 2007, Drew Bledsoe ” doubled back” to his hometown of Walla Walla, Washington to realize a long held dream.

What wine does Drew Bledsoe make?

In 2008, Drew and his wife, Maura, launched Doubleback as an estate-focused winery with the goal to produce world-class cabernet sauvignon —the winery’s name a reference to his return back home.

How much does Drew Bledsoe wine cost?

$60/ bottle only available in 3s.

Who owns Bledsoe winery?

Now, retired NFL All-Pro QB and current Washington vintner Drew Bledsoe (a native son of the Walla Walla Valley wine region) is planting his flag across the Columbia River, snagging an 80-acre property in Oregon’s Eola-Amity Hills AVA with his winemaker and business partner Josh McDaniels.

Where is the Walla Walla Valley?

Walla Walla Valley AVA Location: Located about 250 miles east of Portland, the Walla Walla Valley straddles southeast Washington State and northeast Oregon. More than 2,000 acres of vineyards are hemmed in by the Blue Mountains to the southeast, the Palouse to the north and the Columbia River westward.

Who makes double black cabernet?

Castoro Cellars | Double Black.

Does Drew Bledsoe have a son?

Drew and his wife Maura live in Bend, Oregon, where Maura (née Healy) has family ties, and have four children: sons Stuart, John, Henry, and daughter Healy. He coached his sons, Stuart and John, at Summit High School. John was a walk-on player on the Washington State football team in 2017.

How old was Bledsoe When Brady took over?

The then -29-year-old Bledsoe would never start another game for the Patriots, but he did replace an injured Brady in the 2001 AFC Championship and help the Pats to a 24-17 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Where to buy Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley

2016 VintageTasted: September 2019Aromas of crushed plum, cedar, cigar box, spice, and fresh herbs lead to tastes of rich, jammy, tightly wrapped fruit and herb notes backed by tannins that require a substantial amount of time to become supple and integrated. It’s an enticing offering of diversity that delivers on both its promises and its delivery. At the very least, give it till 2025. Sean P. Sullivan2015 VintageTasted: September 2018As the winery’s first reserve-level wine, this exhibits some reduction right out of the gate, making it difficult to discern the scents of blackberry, smoke, incense, and herbs.

Sullivan2015 VintageTasted: September 2018 Despite the richness of the vintage, the palate maintains an air of refinement and restraint throughout.

Sean P.

The scents of macerated cherries, scorched earth, coffee, barrel spice, and dark chocolate are followed by supple, focused, and intense dark-fruit flavors that are complemented by a smooth, round mouthfeel.

  • This wine is best enjoyed between 2023 and 2030.2013 VintageTasted: January 2016This wine is a combination of grapes from six different vineyards around the valley.
  • Rather than power, it wins on finesse, yet it possesses more than enough quantities of both attributes.
  • It will be at its finest from 2019 to 2027.2009 VintageTasted: July 2014This wine opens with lovely fruit notes that span from raspberry candy to dark layers of black cherry and cassis.2009 VintageTasted: July 2014This wine is still tasting like a very youthful wine.
  • Vintage 2011Tasted: January 2014This is the first year that Doubleback has used estate-grown grapes in the mix, and the result is a wine that is both complex and approachable.
  • The chewy tannins are accentuated by a significant amount of acidity.

Even though the wine was aged in new oak barrels, it retains its perfect balance and distinguishes itself from the other 2010s made by winemaker Chris Figgins.2008 VintageTasted: January 2011There aren’t many wood aromas to be found despite the fact that the wine was aged in new oak barrels.2009 VintageTasted: January 2011There aren’t many wood aromas to be found despite the fact that the wine was aged in new oak barrels.

A beautiful herbal note reminiscent of green tea is included into the fragrance of this wine, which boasts upfront, gorgeous black fruits, juicy acids, some still-unresolved astringency, and a pleasant herbal note reminiscent of green tea.

To begin, there are scents of cinnamon, smoke, cured pork, and bacon; then there are tastes of cassis and delicious black fruits that are tight, dry, and stone-soaked.

The 2018 vintage was tasted in January 2021, the 2017 vintage was tasted in January 2020, the 2015 vintage was tasted in May 2019, and the 2016 vintage was tasted in June 2018.

When to drink: 2017 to 2037, the 2015 vintage was tasted in June 2018, the 2013 vintage was tasted in July 2016, and the 2012 vintage was tasted in June 2015. When to drink: 2022 to 20

Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley

2016 VintageTasted: September 2019Aromas of crushed plum, cedar, cigar box, spice, and fresh herbs lead to tastes of rich, jammy, tightly wrapped fruit and herb notes backed by tannins that require a substantial amount of time to get incorporated into the palate. In terms of diversity, it’s an enticing product that delivers on both promises and delivery. Let’s say it’s not till 2025. Sean P. Sullivan2015 VintageTasted: September 2018This is the winery’s first reserve-level wine, and it displays considerable reduction right out of the gate, making it difficult to discern the scents of blackberry, smoke, incense, and herbs.

  • Sullivan2015 VintageTasted: September 2018 Despite the richness of the vintage, the palate conveys a sense of refinement and restraint.
  • Sean P.
  • Alluring scents of macerated cherries and burnt earth are followed by flavors of black coffee, barrel spice, and dark chocolate.
  • While it does have some tannin, it will benefit from further time in the bottle.

Best from 2023 to 2030.2013 Vintage After a complex nose of cassis and earth with hints of spice, vanilla, and flowers, the palate is well-structured with enough tannic heft to stand up to a few years in the cellar.2012 VintageTasted: January 2015This is an enticing wine with aromas of black coffee, dried herbs, cherry, and oak spices.

  • With enough structure, it will profit from a period of time in the basement.
  • 2009 VintageTasted: July 2014This wine is still tasting like a very youthful wine.
  • The blend contains 14 percent Merlot and 10 percent Petit Verdot.2011 VintageTasted: January 2014This is the first vintage in which estate-grown grapes have been used in the mix.
  • The chewy tannins are accentuated by a significant amount of acid.

Even though the wine was aged in new oak barrels, it retains its perfect balance and distinguishes itself from the other 2010s made by winemaker Chris Figgins.2008 VintageTasted: January 2011Not many wood aromas are present, despite the fact that the wine was aged in new oak barrels.2009 VintageTasted: January 2011The wine has a long, slightly grainy finish that reinforces the impression of raw power.

A beautiful herbal note evocative of green tea is included into the bouquet of this wine, which has upfront, gorgeous black fruits, juicy acids, and some still-unresolved astringency.

To begin, there are scents of cinnamon, smoke, cured pork, and bacon; then there are tastes of cassis and delicious black fruits that are tight, dry, and stone-soaked in tannins.

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The 2018 vintage was tasted in January 2021, the 2017 vintage was tasted in January 2020, the 2015 vintage was tasted in May 2019, and the 2016 vintage was tasted in June 2018.

When to drink: 2017 to 2037, the 2015 vintage was tasted in June 2018, the 2013 vintage was tasted in July 2016, and the 2012 vintage was tasted in June 2015. When to drink: 2019 to 2034

Doubleback

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Bottle Details Store Information Location Price and Size
2018DoublebackCabernet 750mlOne true challenge is creating a wine that will age for decades but will also drink well on release. I think 2018 accomplished that to
$ 51.95 USD
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2018DoublebackBledsoe Family Winery Cabernet SauvignonThis wine must be ordered online or by phone at 510-525-9463. Minimum orders are firm. Timelines associated with expedited delivery services are only from the date of shipment. Solano Cellars cannot…
$ 60.75 USD
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ImbibeBakersfield, CA – 661-633-9463United States
$ 89.00 USD
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$ 104.09 USD
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2016
$ 109.89 USD
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2017
$ 109.95 USD
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$ 109.99 USD
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$ 109.99 USD
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2013DoublebackCabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley95 points Wine Advocate – Another killer wine from the collaboration between Chris Figgins and Drew Bledsoe, there are 3,000 cases of the 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon and it offers sensational notes of…
$ 114.98 USD
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$ 114.99 USD
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2017
$ 117.99 USD
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$ 119.99 USD

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Doubleback Wine – Learn About & Buy Online

Chris Figgins and Drew Bledsoe have been friends for many years, having grown up in the same town. Chris Figgins and Drew Bledsoe have a long history together, having grown up a stone’s throw from each other in Walla Walla, around 400 yards from the Leonetti Cellar Estate. Following high school, they both went on to follow their own aspirations and achieve personal success in their own fields. Drew made the choice to go into the wine industry in early 2007, which brought the two back together.

  • Drew knew Chris was at the top of his list when it came to finding a consultant winemaker, but he wasn’t sure if Chris was interested in working outside of Leonetti Cellar.
  • The timing was quite fortunate.
  • Chris advises Drew on all aspects of winemaking and viticulture, and he was involved in the design and planting of McQueen Vineyard, Drew’s estate vineyard in the Walla Walla Valley, as well as other projects.
  • Show out of stock 17Items after filtering by “ships soonest” Ships as soon as possible 17Items currently out of stock
  • Cabernet Sauvignon (Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington)
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  • It’s free. Cabernet Sauvignon (Doubleback) 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington’s Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, and Yakima Valley.
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  • It’s free. Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington
  • Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington
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  • It’s free. Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley in Washington’s Columbia Valley
  • Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley in Washington’s Columbia Valley
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  • It’s free. 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington’s Walla Walla Valley and Columbia Valley, known as Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon.
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  • It’s free. Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington
  • Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2007 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, Washington
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  • It’s free. 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley in Washington State
  • Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Columbia Valley in Washington State
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  • It’s free. Single-vineyard Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington’s Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, and Yakima Valley.
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  • It’s free. Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley in Washington’s Columbia Valley
  • Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Columbia Valley in Washington
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  • It’s free. Cabernet Sauvignon (Doubleback) 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington’s Walla Walla Valley and Columbia Valley regions.
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  • It works great. Single-vineyard Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon from Washington’s Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, and Yakima Valley.
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  • It’s free. Single-vineyard Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2019 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley, Columbia Valley, and Washington.
  • Prices are as follows: regular Inaccessible at this time $99.00 Take a look at theSave$0.00(0 percent) option. Doubleback Cabernet Sauvignon 2019 Cabernet Sauvignon from the Walla Walla Valley in Washington’s Columbia Valley
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Drew Bledsoe Would Drink ‘Appropriately Aged Barolo’ Forever

Drew Bledsoe, like many other retirees, made the decision to return to his hometown when he finished his professional career. Bledsoe, on the other hand, was walking away from the field as an NFL quarterback and into one of the most picturesque wine areas in the United States, unlike the majority of retirees. At the ripe old age of 35, Bledsoe returned to his Washington roots to establish new ones: His initial estate vineyard, known as McQueen, was planted in 2007. (McQueen is a family name for the Bledsoes; it is Drew’s middle name as well as the middle name of his son Stuart’s father, William.) The next year, he opened his estate-driven winery, Doubleback, which was named in honor of his return to his native Australia.

Bledsoe hired Josh McDaniels to produce his wines — no, not that Josh McDaniels, though it appears as if Bledsoe is unable to escape his association with the New England Patriots — and the two, along with Bledsoe’s wife Maura, have expanded the business to include three additional vineyards within the Walla Walla Valley AVA.

  1. Get the most up-to-date information about beer, wine, and cocktail culture sent directly to your email.
  2. Bledsoe Family Winery, the second label from the Bledsoe and McDaniels partnership, opened a tasting room in Bend, Oregon, in January of this year.
  3. The two have already collaborated on a number of successful projects in the past together.
  4. Read on to find out more.
  5. What is your desert-island beverage of choice, whether it’s a bottle of wine, a beer, or a mixed drink?
  6. I’ll always be a fan of Walla Walla Cabernet, but the moments I’ve had with fine Barolo have been nothing short of enchanted.
  7. Here’s to wonderful companions!

Can you tell me about the first drink you ever recall having?

After putting the kids to bed, I recall taking a drink of something at the top of the stairs.

That’s when I realized that fine wine was a completely different and more intriguing beverage than the beer I’d been drinking all through college up until that point.

How has your taste in wine and other alcoholic beverages evolved over the years?

Initially, I was drawn to the fruit-forward, big-oak type of wine.

In the years afterwards, I’ve grown to prefer the aesthetics of balance and beauty over those of brute strength.

Because of the excellent wines produced in our valley, I am happy to be able to name Walla Walla my hometown.

When you’re out with friends or just chilling out at home, what do you usually order to share?

Being able to reside in the Pacific Northwest, where we have our own versions of Bordeaux and Burgundy right in our own backyard, is a tremendous pleasure.

Is there a particular sort of wine, or another form of beverage, that you’re just getting started with right now, and what is it about it that excites you so much?

I haven’t quite got it yet, but I want to keep practicing until I am completely confident.

What’s your favorite drinking place, and why?

The region of Tuscany is one that we fell in love with throughout our visit.

We were particularly taken by the cuisine and wine, as well as the way of life and the friendliness of the people.

7.

Greattequila is a drink that both my wife and I enjoy. If we’re going out to dinner and we’re not drinking wine, I’ll usually experiment with a shot of tequila on the rocks instead. Date of publication: April 6, 2020

Wine Talk: Drew Bledsoe’s Long Game in Washington and Oregon

Despite the fact that Drew Bledsoe has been producing award-winning wines for more than a decade, his most recent seasons have been championship-level by any measure of measure. The four-time Pro Bowl quarterback for the New England Patriots retired in 2007, and he went on to foundDoubleback in Walla Walla, Wash., which is close to his hometown. From a single Cabernet Sauvignon made from sourced fruit, the company has grown to include four estate vineyards totaling nearly 60 acres, a sleek14,000 square foot gravity-flow winery completed in 2018, a tasting room in Bend, Ore., that opened in 2019, and three brands, the most recent being Bledsoe-McDaniels, which was launched in 2019.

Despite this, the aspirational vintner believes that after 12 years, “we’re only now departing the beginning period of our business and attempting to figure out what we want to be when we grow up.” Ben O’Donnell, assistant editor of The Wine Spectator, chatted with Bledsoe about how he came to love Syrah (and Nebbiolo), how he selects certain projects and passes on others, and his wine rivalry with fellow quarterback-winemaker Damon Huard.

  • Drew Bledsoe managed to get away from cover crop protection in eastern Washington.
  • (With permission from Doubleback) The Wine Spectator says: What prompted you to make the decision to start a winery in Washington State?
  • Therefore, whenever a group of guys came over, I instructed them to bring a bottle of red wine with them.
  • And, of course, I would always add something from the Walla Walla region.
  • But we’d always come out on top!
  • I could return to my hometown and not only make wine, but make wine that we would consider to be of superior quality on the international stage.
  • A lot of people start with Napa Valley when they first get into wine, and I guess that’s where I did too.

It’s common for us to drink a lot of Barolo and Barbaresco from northern Italy, which are two of my favorite wines everywhere in the world.

And as my palate has matured in terms of what I enjoy drinking, you’ve probably noticed a shift in our approach to winemaking toward that style.

I believe that concrete produces fruit that is more pure than oak, which can often be difficult to achieve.

WS:Did these tastes influence your choice to begin producing single-vineyard Syrah and Pinot Noir from Oregon vineyards?

We definitely consume more Willamette Valley Pinot Noir than any other type of wine in our household.

It has a little more of an Old World feel to it than a New World feel.

When making Syrah, we strive to capture some of the black pepper flavor by making it less fruit-driven and more mineral-driven.

WS: Having spent years sharing and leasing winemaking facilities, you finally decided to start your own winery in 2018.

DB:It is permitted to do a few things.

It saves us time because everything is under one roof, and we do not have to visit three separate locations to check on barrels.

In order to allow Josh and his team to accomplish precisely what they wanted during the winemaking process, the system was created.

It also allows us to bring in more fruit into the facility, allowing us to be more picky about which fruits make it into the final mix.

As a result, we’ve been totally integrated throughout the winery, from the soil to the bottle.

WS: You’ve had a very active few years, to say the least.

D.B.: There was one project we investigated that was more of a branding exercise for mass manufacturing, but when we went through our basic values, we realized it didn’t meet any of them.

As a result, we reevaluated our options and opted against proceeding.

We do, however, wish to continue to develop and to accept true new ideas as they arise.

The above image is courtesy of Josh McDaniels/Drew Bledsoe WS:Walla Walla is still considered to be a “underdog” location in some circles.

DB: One of the most noticeable distinctions between the way we competed in football and the way we compete in wine is that, in football, anyone we played had to lose in order for me to win.

Furthermore, in the wine industry, particularly in Walla Walla, if my neighbor is successful, it is beneficial for my business as well.

In addition to being extremely entertaining, there is a tremendous deal of open information exchange.

DB:The most interesting thing that has happened in the past decade with sportsmen who have become interested in wine is that the guys are now taking the wines very seriously.

Rickis is creating some incredible wine down in Napa Valley.

And then there’s Damon Huard up here with Dan Marino, who’s working on a show called Passing Time in Washington.

Damon went to the University of Washington and played quarterback there, and I went to Washington State and played quarterback there, and this week is the Apple Cup game, which is the annual Washington–Washington State game, which takes place in Pullman, Washington.

In addition to being able to talk crap to one another, we can make some great wine.

I believe that because the men who are getting into it today are serious about it, it has begun to dispel some of the negative connotations associated with “jock wines.” People are beginning to see that these are not half-hearted endeavors on the part of the government.

Owen Bargreen

A man who doesn’t need any introduction, Drew Bledsoe is a legendary NFL player who has turned his success on the field into a winery of his own. Over the course of over a decade, he has taken the Washington wine world by storm with his Doubleback winery. Just a few days ago, I had the pleasure of touring his stunning new winery in Walla Walla, Washington. With Drew, you will have a great time talking about wine. Drew is a fun-loving, down-to-earth man who will make you laugh. Drew, who is originally from Walla Walla, ‘doubled back’ after a successful career as an NFL quarterback and launched his own winery, Doubleback, in his hometown.

  1. I believe you will enjoy learning more about Drew’s background in the wine industry.
  2. WWB: How did you initially get interested in wine?
  3. As soon as we had saved enough money, my teammates and I began going out to supper and discovered how exciting wine could be.
  4. I began collecting bottles of wine from all around the world.
  5. My interests were diverse and covered the world.
  6. After some time, I began looking for wines that were more balanced and did not taste too extracted.
  7. When I was playing for the New England Patriots, I had a terrific bunch of guys who were all enjoying drinking wine together.

We started opening and blind tasting wines from all over the world on a consistent basis.

That is where the seed was sown, and it was from there that I began to consider the possibility of returning to Walla Walla when football season was over to work as a winemaker.

DB: For numerous years, Chris Figgins of Leonetti Cellar served as our consulting winemaker at Doubleback Vineyards.

As time progressed, I became increasingly convinced that Chris would leave the company and pursue his own projects.

It became clear very quickly that Josh was capable of handling the entire situation on his own dime.

I had been experimenting with Leonetti for many years, and Josh had been engaged with every vintage of Doubleback during that time.

World Wine Business: How does your NFL success translate to your accomplishments in the wine industry?

We wanted the story to be about a small-town kid who returned home and achieved some level of achievement.

For me, the winery is more than a passing interest or a recreational activity; it is something that we are quite passionate about.

That is where the term “Doubleback” originates from, referring to the act of going back and coming home.

This has been made possible by the wine education I have gotten over the years, notably from Chris Figgins, Greg Harrington, Josh McDaniels, and other individuals who have been crucial in my professional development.

Once you leave the NFL, your will to succeed and your desire to compete remain with you.

Obviously, we are not required to defeat someone in the wine sector, therefore it is to our advantage if we are supporting our neighbor and striving to be the best.

We are not trying to bring the other man down; rather, we are assisting in spreading and influencing the knowledge of how wonderful Walla Walla wines can be.

DB: There are a couple of wine encounters that stand out in my mind.

Although analysts deemed 1998 to be a difficult vintage in Napa, I have discovered something that has been true for a long time: even the so-called terrible vintages yield excellent wine from outstanding winemakers.

There was a significant amount of Cab Franc in the wine, and it was one of the Bordeaux varietals that stood out as particularly distinctive.

I was eating in a restaurant in Buffalo, New York, and having a good time.

That particular wine was a fantastic Burgundy, and it was both ethereal and an incredible experience.

Another great wine experience occurred over a meal with the Golitzins from Quilceda Creek, where Alex brought a bottle of 1998 Chateau Lafitte-Rothchild to share with the group of us.

The 1961 Barolo, Coterno, is possibly the greatest wine that I have ever tasted, and it is the best that I have ever had.

That, in my opinion, is what distinguishes a superb wine. There was an incredible amount of complexity and balance. That is exactly what Josh has going on here: wines that are well-balanced while still being complex at the same time.

August Wine Specials, Washington Winemakers

NINA BUTY is the owner of Buty Winery. Nina Buty, the owner and mother of a boutique-style winery in Walla Walla, contributes to the definition of the vision for the vineyard’s recognized blends. Nina controls every element of the winery, which is comprised of some of the top vineyards in the state. She collaborates with winemaker Chris Dowsett and consulting winemaker Zelma Long to produce a high-quality product. CHARLES SMITH, K Vintners (Charles Smith, K Vintners) Charles’ passion in wine was molded by his upbringing in California, where his parents had a strong European influence.

  • As a winemaker, he is entirely self-taught, with the concept of producing excellent wine for people of all tastes and income levels.
  • Drew and Maura established their first vineyard, McQueen, in 2007, following Drew’s retirement from the NFL.
  • Among their most recent ventures is the creation of Bledsoe Family Winery, a collection of four estate wineries, the most recent being Flying B, all of which are drawn from some of the oldest and most renowned blocks of grapes in the Walla Walla Valley.
  • Based in Walla Walla, Delaware Wine is the latest venture by John and Molly Abbott, who make Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon from grapes sourced in their favorite vineyards in Oregon and Washington, as well as from California and New Zealand.

FEATURED WINE

Classicsémillon aromas of fig and white blossoms mingle with shimmering layers of honeycomb, orange blossom, lemon, chamomile, pear and papaya in this wine that provides fresh surprises with every sip. Seasonal veggies and halibut are good companions.

2018 K VINTNERS, VIOGNIER Columbia Valley, Washington

Beautiful flavors of Meyer lemon, beeswax, honeysuckle, and a hint of spicy heat leave a lasting sensation of richness in the tongue. Finish that is both vibrant and pleasant. Exotic and wonderful, to say the least. Complements spicy foods like as shrimp and calamari, as well as grilled meats such as veal and pig.

2016 BLEDSOE FAMILY, “FLYING B” CABERNETWalla Walla, WASHINGTON

Is it OK to refer to this as a “babyDoubleback”? The Flying B is an inky, dark-colored wine that is a show-stopper. Classic Walla Walla Valley Cabernet Sauvignon with high tones of red and blue fruit with underlying undertones of vanilla and baking spices, this wine is delicious. With: Ribeye steaks, beef stew and swordfish. Also good with: Bittersweet chocolate.

2016 DEVONA, BACCHUS MERLOTColumbia Valley, Washington

It is delicate and complex, with dark blue fruits such as blueberry, mulberry, and fresh huckleberry accentuating the finish.

There are well-integrated tannins in the lingering aftertaste, which makes it complex and smooth. Grilled meats, herb-crusted leg of lamb, tuna, and spaghetti Bolognese are all good pairings.

shop featured washington winemakers online

For Drew Bledsoe, the arrival of fall used to signal the beginning of football season. However, now that he is retired, the arrival of autumnal weather has taken on new significance for the former Patriots quarterback. The 45-year-old former NFL quarterback has switched from tossing touchdowns to crushing grapes and is now an ardent winemaker. In 2011, a year after his final NFL game, Bledsoe officially started Doubleback Winery, a family company in his hometown of Walla Walla, Washington, where he grew up with his siblings.

  • “The most important thing that the successful ones had in common was that they had something to pour themselves into – a location where they could put their enthusiasm for sports into practice,” he added.
  • That was a major driving force behind my desire to create my own business.” After dabbling with a few other companies, including the coffee and oil and gas sectors, he rapidly established himself as a specialist in the wine industry.
  • The justification was straightforward: he enjoys it.
  • Flying B, one of the most recent additions to the portfolio, was planted in the spring of 2017 and spans 48 acres in the Walla Walla Valley.

“It was a wonderful coincidence.” “It enabled me to launch my company in a setting that I was already comfortable with and enjoyed.” Despite the fact that Doubleback was officially founded in 2007, Bledose actually acquired vineyard land in 2003, while he was in the midst of his 11th season in the NFL.

While the number of cases produced has expanded from 600 to about 2,500, the relatively small number of bottles produced — together with the $97 price tag — lends to the feeling of exclusivity associated with the wine.

Through the use of this methodology, he and his team have been able to consider wine as something more than a beverage.

The winery released its latest vintage the day after the Super Bowl LII took place.

Cheers!

Josh McDaniels, Bledsoe’s right-hand man, happens to have the same last name as the current offensive coordinator for the New England Patriots.

“He receives communications on a regular basis.

“In order to be successful, you must surround yourself with a fantastic team,” he stated.

Making a plan and seeing it through to completion.

For football, game planning takes place over the whole summer and every week leading up to a game.

It’s the same in the world of business.

“If you discover that the plan you had in mind isn’t working, you’ll need to be patient since nothing ever goes as easily as you’d like it to.

“You must have the necessary discipline.” What are some of the distinctions?

Either a touchdown or an interception.

In the wine industry, on the other hand, it might take anywhere from 7 to 10 years to find how particular decisions would finally turn out.

According to him, there are more individual bottles of wine on the market than there are of any other product category on the market in the globe.

“We’re currently in the process of relocating to the new winery,” Bledsoe explained.

Drew and Maura Bledsoe on the construction site for one of their new barrel rooms in April 2017.

“I’ve had the opportunity to train all three of my boys as they’ve progressed,” he explained.

Bledsoe was appointed honorary team captain for New England’s AFC Championship game versus Jacksonville, which took place earlier this month.

Following New England’s exciting victory in Super Bowl LI, quarterback Tom Brady and club owner Robert Kraft celebrated with a bottle of Doubleback’s Cabernet Sauvignon from the Doubleback Winery.

“Perhaps once he’s retired,” he speculated.

Maybe a bottle or two may be shared one day when we sit down together.” As for what he might be able to do for Belichick, “I don’t really care what he likes,” Bledsoe remarked of his friend’s taste.

“I’m just going to drink whatever I want.” Drew Bledsoe is embraced by Robert Kraft before to the AFC Championship game.

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