Where In The Us Do People Drink The Most Wine Per Capita? (Correct answer)

Read on to see VinePair’s color-coded maps depicting wine consumption per capita and by volume below.

Ranking The States: Gallons Per Capita.

Rank State Gallons of Ethanol Per Capita*
1 Idaho 1.21
2 Washington, D.C. 1.02
3 New Hampshire 0.84
4 Vermont 0.78

47 •

Which states consume the most wine in America?

  • The Golden State also happens to be responsible for 86 percent of America’s total wine output. In per capita wine consumption, Idaho once again leads the way, followed by DC, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Vermont.

Contents

Which state drinks most wine per capita?

This Is the State That Drinks the Most Wine, According to Data

  • Kentucky. iStock.
  • South Dakota. iStock.
  • Nebraska. iStock.
  • Oklahoma. Shutterstock.
  • Utah. Shutterstock.
  • Mississippi. Shutterstock.
  • Kansas. Shutterstock.
  • West Virginia. Shutterstock. Average annual amount of wine per person: 0.11 gallons.

What state drinks most wine?

Idahoans are out drinking most of us as Idaho is named the number one state in America that drinks the most wine PER CAPITA! According to National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and VinePair Idaho residents drink 1.2 gallons of wine per capita.

Where do people drink the most wine?

These are the countries that drank the most wine in 2020

  • 1.US – 33mhl.
  • France – 24.7mhl.
  • Italy – 24.5mhl.
  • Germany – 19.8mhl.
  • UK – 13.3mhl.
  • China – 12.4mhl.
  • Russia – 10.3mhl.
  • Spain – 9.6mhl.

What city consumes the most wine in the US?

Business Insider conducted the most recent research on how much wine America is really consuming on a yearly basis. Interestingly, the District of Columbia (D.C.) finished at the top of the list.

What is the drunkest state?

While Utah came out as the least-drunk state in America, with just 12.2% of its population drinking excessively, Wisconsin was ranked as the drunkest state, with a whopping 24.2% of its population drinking excessively – five percent higher than the national average.

What state consumes the most alcohol 2020?

New Hampshire is currently the state with the highest per capita alcohol consumption in the United States.

Do Italians drink more wine than Americans?

Studies show that Americans actually drink more wine than Italians do! Italians are spending more on their wines and drinking less quantity, all the while increasing quality. They are always a step ahead when it comes to wine culture! Gone are the days when any old bottle will do on the dinner table.

Which US state consumes the most rosé?

Yup, Washington, DC, our nation’s capital, is also the capital of rosé sipping, drinking eight times more of the pale pink drink than the state of California, according to a new report by wine-discovery platform Wine Access.

Which state consumes the most beer?

This Is the State That Drinks the Most Beer, Data Shows

  • Wisconsin. 1.29 gallons.
  • Maine. 1.34 gallons.
  • Nevada. 1.35 gallons. RELATED: This Is the Drunkest State in America.
  • South Dakota. 1.37 gallons.
  • North Dakota. 1.50 gallons.
  • Vermont. 1.53 gallons.
  • Montana. 1.60 gallons.
  • New Hampshire. 1.79 gallons.

The States that Drink the Most Wine in America [Map]

Did you know that Californians and Oregonians consume the greatest amount of wine in the United States? Reconsider your position: The amount of wine consumed per capita in each of these wine-producing regions is insignificant when compared to other states, such as Idaho, where the number of wineries is fast increasing. Californians consume the most wine in terms of volume, which is not unexpected given the state’s size — and the fact that the state is responsible for 86 percent of all wine produced in the United States.

For some reason, New Hampshire also ranks #1 in terms of beer consumption (which is interesting).

Are you curious about how much wine is consumed in your native state?

THE STATES THAT DRINK THE MOST WINE PER CAPITA

Despite the fact that Idahoans consume the most wine per capita, the citizens of West Virginia, Kansas, and Mississippi prefer beer and distilled spirits. Despite the fact that Idaho people consume 1.2 gallons of wine per capita, inhabitants of West Virginia, Kansas, and Mississippi consume less than 0.2 gallons of wine per capita, they consume almost a gallon of beer and 2 gallons of spirits per year, respectively.

THE STATES THAT DRINK THE MOST WINE BY VOLUME

The heavily populous states of California, Florida, New York and Texas lead the list of states that consume the most wine overall, with Wyoming, West Virginia, and South Dakota completing the list of states that consume the least wine. This equates to a difference of 155.6 million gallons between California and South Dakota, from the top to the bottom.

Ranking The States: Gallons Per Capita

Rank State Gallons of Ethanol Per Capita*
1 Idaho 1.21
2 Washington, D.C. 1.02
3 New Hampshire 0.84
4 Vermont 0.78
5 Delaware 0.72
6 Massachusetts 0.63
7 California 0.62
8 Connecticut 0.6
8 Nevada 0.6
10 Hawaii 0.59
11 Oregon 0.58
12 Rhode Island 0.57
12 New Jersey 0.57
14 Alaska 0.53
15 Colorado 0.52
15 Florida 0.52
15 New York 0.52
18 Montana 0.51
18 Washington 0.51
20 Virginia 0.49
21 Illinois 0.45
21 North Carolina 0.45
23 Maine 0.44
23 Minnesota 0.44
25 Michigan 0.40
26 Arizona 0.39
26 Wisconsin 0.39
26 Maryland 0.39
29 Missouri 0.38
30 Louisiana 0.34
30 North Dakota 0.34
30 Texas 0.34
33 Pennsylvania 0.33
34 Tennessee 0.32
34 Wyoming 0.32
36 New Mexico 0.31
36 Ohio 0.31
38 Indiana 0.29
39 Alabama 0.26
40 Georgia 0.25
40 South Carolina 0.25
42 Arkansas 0.23
42 Iowa 0.23
44 Kentucky 0.22
44 South Dakota 0.22
46 Nebraska 0.21
47 Oklahoma 0.20
47 Utah 0.20
49 Mississippi 0.18
50 Kansas 0.14
51 West Virginia 0.11

Ranking The States: Gallons Overall

Rank State Gallons Overall
1 California 155.6M
2 Florida 72.7M
3 New York 65.8M
4 Texas 60.3M
5 Illinois 37M
6 New Jersey 33M
7 North Carolina 30.2M
8 Massachusetts 28.9M
9 Pennsylvania 27.7M
10 Virginia 27M
11 Michigan 26M
12 Washington 24.8M
13 Ohio 23.2M
14 Colorado 18.9M
15 Arizona 17.7M
16 Georgia 16.6M
17 Oregon 15.7M
17 Minnesota 15.7M
19 Missouri 15M
19 Maryland 15M
21 Wisconsin 14.7M
22 Connecticut 14M
22 Tennessee 14M
24 Idaho 13.2M
25 Indiana 12.5M
26 Nevada 11.7M
27 Louisiana 9.9M
28 South Carolina 8.2M
29 Alabama 8.1M
30 New Hampshire 7.6M
31 Kentucky 6.2M
32 Hawaii 5.4M
33 Oklahoma 4.9M
34 Washington, D.C. 4.7M
35 Iowa 4.6M
36 Arkansas 4.5M
36 Delaware 4.5M
38 New Mexico 4.2M
39 Rhode Island 4M
40 Maine 3.9M
41 Utah 3.8M
42 Montana 3.5M
43 Mississippi 3.4M
44 Vermont 3.2M
45 Kansas 2.7M
46 Nebraska 2.6M
47 Alaska 2.4M
48 North Dakota 1.6M
49 West Virginia 1.3M
50 South Dakota 1.2M
50 Wyoming 1.2M

*Before generating per capita consumption estimates, this data converts an estimate of the average ethanol concentration of sold or transported wine into gallons of ethanol (pure alcohol). According to this information, the alcohol content of wine is 0.129 percent by volume. A version of this story first appeared on VP Pro, our free publishing platform and newsletter for the drinks business, which covers wine, beer, and liquor – as well as other topics. Register for VP Pro right away! Date of publication: June 16, 2020

The States That Drink the Most Wine in America (Maps)

National Institutes of Health issued a paper that examined drinking patterns in different states. The findings were eye-opening. VinePair divides it out based on the total and per capita wine consumption in each of the 50 states. Californians are the wine drinkers who consume the most wine worldwide. This is not surprising considering that California’s population of 39 million thirsty residents is nearly 70 times larger than that of Wyoming, the state with the lowest consumption of wine in the country.

  • Idaho leads the way in terms of per capita wine consumption once again, followed by the District of Columbia, New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Vermont.
  • Get the most up-to-date information about beer, wine, and cocktail culture sent directly to your email.
  • When statewide alcohol sales or tax revenue figures were not available, the surveyors looked at data from control states and shipment data to augment their conclusions.
  • Take a look at VinePair’s maps.

It is worth mentioning that New Hampshire’s low alcohol taxes are likely a contributing factor to the state’s high ranking in terms of per capita consumption. Originally published on January 8, 2019

This Is the State That Drinks the Most Wine, According to Data — Best Life

Whether you’re pouring yourself a glass of pinot noir after a long day at the office or sipping on a crisp chardonnay over Sunday brunch, there’s nothing quite like a glass of wine to let you escape the stresses of everyday life. In fact, it’s the favored beverage of many Americans; according to a Gallup poll, wine was regarded as the second most popular adult beverage in the United States, with 30 percent of participants selecting it as their favourite beverage. (Beer took first place with 38 percent of the vote.) According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), overall alcohol consumption in the United States has been increasing, and COVID has only served to increase those rates even further.

  • VinePair utilized data from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), gathered from 1977 to 2019 (although before the epidemic), to determine how many gallons of wine the typical American consumes each year in each state.
  • (By comparison, the state with the least amount of wine consumption sees its citizens use only.11 gallons per year, which is 11 times less.) Want to discover which state consumes the most wine out of all of them, and how your state compares to the rest of the country?
  • RELATED: According to data, this is the state that consumes the most alcoholic beverages.
  • Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.14 gallons.
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Average annual wine consumption per person: 0.20 gallons, according to Shutterstock Image courtesy of ShutterstockAverage annual consumption of wine per person: 0.20 gallon Average yearly quantity of wine consumed per person: 0.21 gallon siStock Average yearly quantity of wine consumed per person: 0.22 gallon siStock siStock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.22 gallons.

iStock photo by Davel5957 The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.23 gallons.

Average yearly quantity of wine consumed per person: 0.26 gallon siStock Average yearly quantity of wine consumed per person: 0.29 gallon siStock Average yearly quantity of wine consumed by a person: 0.31 gallons siStock Average yearly wine consumption per person: 0.31 gallon, according to Shutterstock Average yearly quantity of wine consumed by a person: 0.32 gallons siStock Shutterstock photograph by ESB Professional The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.32 gallon.

  • siStockAverage annual quantity of wine consumed by each individual: 0.33 gallons siStock Submitted by Eric Urquhart for Shutterstock.com The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.34 gallons.
  • Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.34 gallon.
  • Average yearly wine consumption per person: 0.39 gallons, according to Shutterstock Average yearly wine consumption per person: 0.39 gallons, according to Shutterstock Photograph by Sean Pavone / iStock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.39 gallons.
  • Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed annually by a person is 0.44 gallons.
  • siStock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.45 gallons.
  • Photograph by Sean Pavone / Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.49 gallons.
  • courtesy of spabradyphoto / iStock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.51 gallon.

Related: If you live in one of these states, you should prepare for a shortage of alcoholic beverages.

urbanglimpses courtesy of iStock The average amount of wine consumed annually by a person is 0.53 gallons.

Average yearly wine consumption per person: 0.57 gallon, according to Shutterstock siStock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.58 gallon.

Average yearly wine consumption per person: 0.60 gallons, according to Shutterstock Photograph by Faina Gurevich / Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.60 gallons.

Photograph by f11photo / Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed year by a person is 0.63 gallon.

via Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed annually by a person is 0.78 gallons.

Photograph by Kenneth Keifer / Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed annually by a person is 0.84 gallons. Shutterstock The average amount of wine consumed annually by a person is 1.21 gallons. RELATED: According to data, this is the state where the most beer is consumed.

These States Drink the Most Wine Per Capita

And California isn’t even among the top five states in terms of economic development. Some states may appear to be more suited to wine consumption than others: There’s a reason why the film Sideways was set in California rather than Iowa (though a sequel set in Iowa would be an interesting change from the original story! ). Is there a relationship between the quantity of wine a state produces and the amount of wine a state consumes? The location is located in the United States of America. VinePair recently published a report detailing which states consume the most wine — both in terms of pure volume and per capita — based on data from the National Institutes of Health, and the findings aren’t always as straightforward as they appear.

  1. California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Illinois are the states with the most wine production.
  2. To your own satisfaction, you can conjecture about why Texas dropped a few of points on the previous ranking.
  3. Despite the fact that Wyoming, Vermont, Alaska, North Dakota, and South Dakota are the five least populous states in the United States, the five states with the lowest overall volume of wine consumption are Wyoming, West Virginia, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Alaska.
  4. However, because they do not include the effect of demographic bias, the per capita figures offer a considerably more accurate representation of how much wine is consumed in different states.
  5. (However, VinePair points out that New Hampshire’s low alcohol taxes may have contributed to the state’s better ranking on the list.) West Virginia, Kansas, Mississippi, Utah, and Oklahoma are the states with the lowest per capita consumption of wine: Kansas, Mississippi, Utah, and Oklahoma.
  6. Where do they rank in terms of population per capita?

Top U.S. states by wine alcohol consumption per capita 2019

This statistic shows the top ten states in the United States in terms of per capita alcohol consumption from wine in 2019. In the state of Vermont, the consumption of alcoholic beverages through wine reached 0.75 gallons of ethanol per person for the year 2010.

(pure alcohol). The Health People initiative, which was started by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, established a national goal of no more than 2.1 gallons of alcohol consumed per capita in the United States.

Top 10 U.S. states based on alcohol consumption per capita from wine in 2019(in gallons of ethanol)

Characteristic Consumption per capita in gallons of ethanol
District of Columbia 1.01
New Hampshire 0.82
Vermont 0.75
Delaware 0.71
Massachusetts 0.61
California 0.61
Nevada 0.6
Connecticut 0.6
Hawaii 0.59
New Jersey 0.58

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The Surprising State That Drinks The Most Wine In The U.S.

Shutterstock While wine consumption dropped for the first time in a quarter-century last year (yeah, you can blame it on millennials, as well as hard seltzer, according to CBS News), it’s still wine o’clock someplace at some point of the day. You’ll never believe which state consumes the greatest quantities of this illustrious beverage, though. That would be a huge surprise if it were Utah – now that would be a genuine bombshell! The state of Utah, in keeping with its state reputation, is towards the bottom of a list of wine consumption per capita that was compiled by VinePair in order to break down wine consumption per capita state-by-state.

Utah is ranked last on the list of states that drink wine, followed by Mississippi (0.18), Kansas (0.14), and West Virginia (0.14), in that order (0.11).

Idaho?

Idahoans beat out rest of the country with their wine drinking habits

Shutterstock Idaho, indeed, the state famed for its potatoes and not much else except potatoes. Yes, Idaho has stunning landscape, and don’t forget that a portion of Yellowstone National Park is located there (along with a slew of other noteworthy attractions, according to the National Park Service), but as far as states go, Idaho appears to like to keep things low-key and under the radar. Finally, we might be able to figure out why! For the simple reason that if they were ever overrun by visitors, it would have a negative impact on the wine supply.

California is surprisingly low on the list

Shutterstock The state of Idaho, known for its potatoes and nothing else, is right there with you. In all seriousness, Idaho has some spectacular scenery, and don’t forget that a portion of Yellowstone National Park is located there (among other interesting attractions, according to the National Park Service), but when it comes to state politics, Idaho appears to be more interested in keeping things low-key and off the radar. Maybe we’ll find out why after all. Due to the possibility of visitors invading the country, the wine supply may be jeopardized.

The current state of affairs is that each citizen (over the age of 21, we hope) manages to consume, on average, more than ten times the amount of wine consumed by those abstinent West Virginians, amounting to an astounding 1.2 gallons of wine consumed annually by each resident (we hope).

Per capita US wine consumption, by state

We are frequently informed of the amount of wine consumed by each individual in a certain geographical location, as well as the amount of beer and spirits consumed. As a result of the disparity in population between each location, this is weakened. Because there are just half as many people in Sweden as there are in New York state, the inhabitants of Sweden are less likely to drink as much as the people of New York state. In a similar vein, of course, we all consume more wine now than we did previously since there are more people.

  • In this case, we’re talking about per capita consumption, which is calculated by dividing total consumption by the population size.
  • The Wine Institute is the source for the first graph, which I have included below.
  • Per capita consumption would, of course, be slightly higher if only those of legal drinking age were included in the calculations.
  • If you wish to convert liters to bottles, you may do so by multiplying the number of liters by 1.3.
  • 1.
  • It is possible that it may endure into 2021 depending on global supply networks (Will there be another pandemic-related shortage?
  • It goes without saying that wine consumption surged significantly following the repeal of Prohibition, with a little decrease during World War II; nevertheless, consumption then plateaued during the 1950s and early 1960s.
  • As a result, we now know that they were more alcoholics than the Silent Generation (before them).

Some believe that the continuous increase in wine consumption since the mid-1990s is due to the rising popularity of the so-called Mediterranean Diet (for example, the increase in American wine consumption per capita since 1994): Since 1994, annual increases in wine consumption have been observed in the United States.

In November 1991, 60 Minutes broadcast a story on the relationship between French food and heart disease rates: Sixty Minutes featured American and French experts who claimed that there is a link between moderate alcohol use, particularly red wine, and a decreased risk of coronary heart disease.

  1. The current average consumption of wine per person per year is around 14.5 bottles, or approximately 1 bottle every 3.5 weeks.
  2. Using data from the AAWE, we can split this down by state in the United States (Per capita wine consumption in the United States, 2019).
  3. Aside from including an indication of the physical location of each place, which usually correlates with sociological variances, I also included a description of the basic trends to help clarify them.
  4. Isn’t it self-evident that this is the case?
  5. The southern and midwestern states consume far less wine than the rest of the country; they are, nevertheless, known to favor other alcoholic beverages over wine.
  6. It appears that the retirees in Florida came from someplace up north, and that they took their wine drinking habits along with them.

Furthermore, it appears that wine salespeople in Maryland and Pennsylvania would be well-served by focusing their efforts on these states’ residents. VinePair provides an alternate version of comparable data from 2018, in which their data is plotted as a map rather than as a table.

Where in the US are the biggest wine drinkers? Not California apparently, data shows

Idaho, are you sipping on a glass of wine? It turns out that you’re not the only one feeling this way. New research from VinePair has discovered that Idahoans consume the most wine per capita in the United States. As reported by VinePair.com, “Idaho inhabitants consume an average of 1.2 gallons of wine per capita, whereas West Virginians, Kansans, and Mississippians consume an average of less than 0.2 gallons of wine per capita.” “each year, I consume around one gallon of beer and two gallons of alcohol.” What criteria did VinePair use to compile this list?

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Idahoans consumed far more wine per capita than residents of any other state.

This isn’t the first time that Idaho has led the list of states that consume the most wine.

In an interview with the Idaho Statesman last year, Moya Dolsby, executive director of the Idaho Wine Commission, said, “It’s feasible.” “Idaho is a state that consumes a lot of wine.” California didn’t even crack the top five in terms of per-capita usage, according to the study.

As VinePair noted, “unsurprisingly, the heavily populous states of California, Florida, New York, and Texas rank first and second, respectively, on the list of states that consume the most wine overall – with Wyoming, West Virginia, and South Dakota consuming the least.” The gap between California and South Dakota, from top to bottom, is 155.6 million gallons.

The State That Drinks The Most Wine In America May Surprise You

Shutterstock If you prefer unwinding with a glass of wine at the end of a hectic day, you are by no means alone in your feelings. After all, wine is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages in the world, and people have been enjoying it since, well, pretty much the beginning of time. According to National Geographic, people have been making wine for at least 6,000 years, so it’s safe to assume that it’s a rather popular beverage. Even yet, wine is more popular in some locations than in others, depending on where you live.

We now know which states consume the most wine, thanks to data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism that was evaluated by VinePair.

Idaho consumes the most wine per capita

Shutterstock Given the large number of vineyards in California, it would be reasonable to assume that the state consumes the most amount of wine. Despite the fact that you are accurate in believing that California consumes the most wine in terms of volume, this is merely due to the state’s vast population. The state of Idaho, on the other hand, ranks first in terms of wine consumption per capita when this statistic is taken into consideration. Idaho inhabitants consume an astounding 1.2 gallons of water per person each day.

The state of West Virginia sits at the bottom of the list, with citizens consuming only 0.11 gallons of water per capita. Their use of other alcoholic drinks makes up for it, with around a gallon of beer and two gallons of spirits consumed yearly.

These states drink the most wine

Photo courtesy of lithian/Shutterstock According to the National Institutes of Health, people in the United States are consuming more wine than ever before – twice as much as they were in the 1960s. And while Americans are consuming more wine from coast to coast and from the northern border to the southern border, certain states are breaking out the bottles at a faster rate than others, according to the Wine Institute. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) collated statistics on how much wine each state consumes based on wine sales (which it refers to as “apparent alcohol consumption for the States”) in 2016, and the findings might not be what you anticipate.

  1. California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Illinois are the states that purchase the most wine in terms of overall volume.
  2. It is the most striking indicator of the nation’s wine consumption habits that the largest wine-drinking states are measured by per capita production.
  3. New Hampshire, New Mexico, and Vermont are the states with the highest scores, with 0.73, followed by Delaware.
  4. Meanwhile, West Virginia, Kansas, Mississippi, Utah, and Oklahoma are the states with the lowest per capita consumption of wine in the country.
  5. If your state did not make the cut, don’t feel like you’ve been forgotten.

Local Boise publications questioned the quality of the data provided by VinePair and the data’s ability to determine how much wine is really being consumed, quoting one citizen who wants to see a “Mythbusters-style test” — which is reasonable, but the best available data comes exclusively from sales.

US Wine Consumption

Wine Consumption in the United States

Year Total Wine per Resident1 Total Wine Gallons Total Table Wine Gallons2
2020 3.09 gals 1 billion 870 million
2019 2.91 gals 967 million 803 million
2018 2.92 gals 962 million 803 million
2017 2.94 gals 960 million 801 million
2016 2.92 gals 946 million 790 million
2015 2.86 gals 919 million 772 million
2014 2.82 gals 898 million 769 million
2013 2.83 gals 894 million 775 million
2012 2.78 gals 872 million 759 million
2011 2.72 gals 847 million 731 million
2010 2.58 gals 798 million 693 million
2009 2.51 gals 770 million 672 million
2008 2.46 gals 747 million 649 million
2007 2.48 gals 746 million 650 million
2006 2.37 gals 707 million 617 million
2005 2.33 gals 687 million 603 million
2004 2.24 gals 657 million 579 million
2003 2.19 gals 637 million 566 million
2002 2.15 gals 620 million 555 million
2001 2.16 gals 617 million 550 million
2000 2.02 gals 571 million 510 million
1999 2.08 gals 567 million 496 million
1998 1.94 gals 526 million 466 million
1997 1.9 gals 508 million 451 million
1996 1.89 gals 500 million 439 million
1995 1.74 gals 456 million 398 million
1994 1.73 gals 451 million 388 million
1993 1.70 gals 439 million 373 million
1992 1.86 gals 474 million 403 million
1991 1.82 gals 460 million 389 million
1990 2.05 gals 508 million 422 million
1989 2.08 gals 515 million 425 million
1988 2.24 gals 551 million 457 million
1987 2.39 gals 580 million 481 million
1986 2.44 gals 587 million 487 million
1985 2.42 gals 577 million 476 million
1984 2.32 gals 549 million 397 million
1983 2.25 gals 528 million 402 million
1982 2.2 gals 514 million 397 million
1981 2.20 gals 506 million 387 million
1980 2.11 gals 480 million 360 million
1979 1.97 gals 444 million 325 million
1978 1.95 gals 435 million 305 million
1977 1.82 gals 401 million 262 million
1976 1.73 gals 376 million 228 million
1975 1.70 gals 368 million 209 million
1974 1.63 gals 349 million 192 million
1973 1.64 gals 348 million 185 million
1972 1.61 gals 337 million 170 million
1971 1.47 gals 305 million 155 million
1970 1.30 gals 267 million 133 million
1969 1.16 gals 236 million 112 million
1968 1.06 gals 214 million 96 million
1967 1.02 gals 203 million 88 million
1966 0.97 gals 191 million 79 million
1965 0.98 gals 190 million 74 million
1964 0.97 gals 186 million 70 million
1963 0.93 gals 176 million 64 million
1962 0.90 gals 168 million 60 million
1961 0.93 gals 172 million 57 million
1960 0.90 gals 163 million 53 million
1959 0.89 gals 156 million 48 million
1958 0.89 gals 155 million 47 million
1957 0.89 gals 152 million 45 million
1956 0.90 gals 150 million 45 million
1955 0.88 gals 145 million 43 million
1954 0.88 gals 142 million 42 million
1953 0.89 gals 141 million 40 million
1952 0.88 gals 138 million 38 million
1951 0.83 gals 126 million 36 million
1950 0.93 gals 141 million 36 million
1949 0.89 gals 133 million 32 million
1948 0.84 gals 122 million 28 million
1947 0.67 gals 97 million 23 million
1946 1.00 gals 140 million 37 million
1945 0.71 gals 94 million 27 million
1944 0.74 gals 99 million 36 million
1943 0.73 gals 97 million 38 million
1942 0.84 gals 113 million 32 million
1941 0.76 gals 101 million 29 million
1940 0.68 gals 90 million 27 million
1939 0.59 gals 77 million n/a
1938 0.52 gals 67 million n/a
1937 0.52 gals 67 million n/a
1936 0.47 gals 60 million n/a
1935 0.36 gals 46 million n/a
1934 0.26 gals 33 million n/a

BW166/Gomberg estimations from the Wine Institute and Fredrikson Associates. Preliminary. The course of history has been changed. 1 Based on all wine kinds, including sparkling wine, dessert wine, vermouth, other unique natural wines, and table wine, as well as the Bureau of the Census resident population, this statistic is derived. If the population of legal drinking age is taken into consideration, per capita consumption will be greater. 2 Includes all still wines with an alcohol content of less than 14 percent, excluding cider.

This Is the Country That Drinks the Most Wine, Data Says — Eat This Not That

Last year, 23.4 billion liters of wine were consumed throughout the world. This is the place where wine is still the top commodity on the market. The date is May 7, 2021. Shutterstock Sun, fresh scenery, delicious eating, and perhaps a few fine glasses of wine are just a few of the pleasures of a long-awaited holiday. Some of these pleasures may not be as far away as you think if you plan ahead of time. According to a new survey, worldwide wine consumption has decreased to its lowest level in 20 years, but a few nations in particular have been drinking the most.

  • According to one international wine association, one country “easily leads” the world’s wine consumption, while another comes in second.
  • According to its research, the OIV predicts that the globe will consume 23.4 billion liters of wine in 2020, on a worldwide scale.
  • or even raised their glasses a little more than usual last year.
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According to the OIV, this was the third year in a row that wine consumption among Chinese people had seen a “severe fall.” A significant segment of Chinese wine consumption takes place in bars and restaurants, such as during business dinners or happy hour-style gatherings with friends—events that were off the table during the pandemic, according to Dr.

IN CONNECTION WITH: Chinese Restaurant Orders in China Are Not Consumed Shutterstock Wine is often considered to be a labor of love for the Spanish (as are the healthy living practices that allow many of them to maintain their slim figure!

While it appears that even the kangaroos are enjoying a stroll through a beautiful South Australian vineyard, human wine consumers in Australia consumed 3.7 percent less wine in 2020 than they did the year before, a total of around 570 million liters in 2020.

That appears to be the case, since France’s wine consumption has not been hampered by the epidemic, which reached around 2.5 billion liters per year in both 2019 and 2020.

RELATED: This French Bakery Is Taking Over a Walmart Location Shutterstock Germany, known for its wine country areas such as the Kaiserstuhl mountains, which can be seen above, was one of the countries that observed an upward wine trend, with wine consumption growing by 0.2 percent from 2019 to 2020 in the country.

  • During the epidemic, there was a reported 3 percent increase in wine consumption in Russia compared to the previous year.
  • Shutterstock The country of Italy is well-renowned for its wine, which is why some people are shocked to learn that the Italians aren’t recognized for being heavy drinkers themselves.
  • According to reports, Italian drinking increased by 7.5 percent last year compared to the previous year.
  • Shutterstock Portugal is so devoted to its wine that a summer regatta event honors the country’s most renowned port wine companies by emblazoning their emblems on the sails of the competing boats.
  • Shutterstock “The United States clearly leads the list of nations that consume the most wine,” according to the OIV’s data, which included these attendees at a wine festival in Maryland in 2019.
  • Avoid missing The1 Reason You Shouldn’t Be Drinking Wine Every Day, no matter if you’re at a safe, modest event or just relaxing at home with a glass of red or white wine.

Krissy Gasbarre is a model and actress. At Eat This, Not That!, Krissy works as a senior news editor, where she is responsible for overseeing morning and weekend news in the areas of nutrition, wellness, restaurants and grocery (with a particular emphasis on drinks), and other topics. Readmore

Which state drinks the most alcohol? Here’s a ranking of all 50 (plus D.C.)

(Image courtesy of Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) ) Americans prefer to consume booze. There was a lot of booze. An investigation conducted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism found that Americans consumed 7.8 billion gallon of alcoholic beverages in 2018. In terms of volume, that translates into 6.3 billion gallons of beer, 900 million gallons of wine, and 570 million gallons of hard liquor and spirits. This equates to 2.35 gallons per person per year, or around 501 drinks per person per year.

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When it comes to consuming alcoholic beverages, here is a rating of all 50 states plus Washington, D.C.

51. Utah

(Photo courtesy of AP photographer Colin Braley) There isn’t much of a surprise here. Population of Utah utilize an average of just 1.35 gallons of water per year, which is more than three times less than the residents of the state that ranks first on this list.

50. West Virginia

(Photo courtesy of AP/Steve Helber) For now, the state of West Virginia will have to be content with its position as the nation’s leading coal producer. A total of 1.74 gallons of alcoholic beverages are consumed in the Mountaineer State per year.

49. Arkansas

(Photo courtesy of Jerome Miron/USA TODAY Sports) Arkansans consume 1.78 gallons of alcoholic beverages per year. Whether this pint of Guinness that Bill Clinton tipped in Dublin when he was President of the United States would have counted toward that total is debatable.

48. Oklahoma

(From the USA TODAY Network) Oklahomans consume 1.85 gallons of water each year, most of which is consumed when rooting for the Sooners, Cowboys, or Thunder.

47. Georgia

A report from the USA TODAY Network states that When Oklahomans are rooting for the Sooners, Cowboys, or Thunder, they consume 1.85 gallons of water per year.

46. Kansas

(Image courtesy of Brian Davidson/Getty Images.) ) Perhaps the average daily consumption of 1.92 gallons in the Sunflower State will increase now that grocery shops are no longer required to offer beer with only 3.2 percent alcohol content.

45. Kentucky

(USA TODAY Network)How come Kentuckyers only drink 1.95 gallons of whiskey each year, despite all of the excellent bourbon available nearby? The Wildcats and Cardinals were both eliminated from the NCAA tournament, so I believed they’d pass that test on Derby Day.

44. Alabama

(Photo courtesy of Marvin Gentry/USA TODAY Sports) At 1.99 gallons, Bama has eaten the majority of his liquid while watching the cars heat up at Talladega Superspeedway.

43. Ohio

(From the USA TODAY Network) Each year, inhabitants of Ohio consume 2.03 gallons of water, the smallest amount of any state in the upper Midwestern region.

42. Maryland

(Photo courtesy of AP photographer Patrick Semansky) Maryland ranks 42nd in the US with 2.08 gallons of alcohol consumed each year, despite the fact that the Orioles have provided citizens with plenty of reasons to consume far more.

41. Virginia

(From the USA TODAY Network) Virginia has a surprisingly robust wine culture, and the state’s most famous citizen, George Washington, enjoyed brewing his own beer in his own kitchen at home.

Residents of today consume 2.13 gallons of water each year.

40. Tennessee

Photo courtesy of Associated Press photographer Mark Humphrey. Tennessee consumes 2.14 gallons of alcohol each year, most of which is likely in the form of Jack Daniels.

39. Indiana

(From the USA TODAY Network) Hoosiers consume 2.15 gallons of water per year, yet they had never done so before getting behind the wheel of an Indy Car.

38. Nebraska

Stephen Branscombe/Getty Images contributed to this image. ) Omaha’s nightlife is underappreciated, and the city is a great place to drink, with residents consuming an average of 2.16 gallons of alcoholic beverages each year.

37. South Carolina

(From the USA TODAY Network) The Palmetto State drinks 2.16 gallons of water per year, which is tied with Nebraska.

36. MIssissippi

(Thomas Graning photo courtesy of AP) The University of Mississippi’s “The Grove” draws its fair share of weight before football games, with the state averaging 2.17 gallons each year on average.

35. North Carolina

Sierra Nevada has a presence in Asheville and produces beer that contributes to the state’s annual average consumption of 2.17 gallons of beer.

34. New York

There is a Sierra Nevada outpost in Asheville that makes beer that contributes to the state’s annual average beer consumption of 2.17 gallons.

33. Washington

(Image courtesy of Abbie Parr/Getty Images) ) How many beer funnels do you need to consume during a Seahawks game in order to consume the 2.22 gallons required by Washington?

32. Arizona

In Arizona, more than a few beers are drank on scorching golf courses, contributing to the state’s average annual water consumption of 2.25 gallons. (USA TODAY Network)

31. Texas

(Photo courtesy of Rose Baca/The Dallas Morning News via Associated Press) The average annual consumption of alcoholic beverages in the Lone Star state is 2.26 gallons.

30. New Mexico

(From the USA TODAY Network) The state of New Mexico has significantly less inhabitants than its neighbor Texas, but the state’s per capita water use of 2.26 gallons is on par with its neighbors across the state border.

29. Pennsylvania

(Image courtesy of Jeff Swensen/Getty Images) ) Pennsylvanians would almost certainly consume more than 2.34 gallons of alcoholic beverages per year if the state did not make purchasing alcoholic beverages such a complicated procedure.

28. Michigan

Michiganders consume an average of 2.36 gallons of alcoholic beverages each year, according to the United States Alcoholic Beverage Administration.

27. New Jersey

(USAT) The state of New Jersey, like Michigan, produces an average of 2.26 gallons per year. That is.05 greater than the city of New York.

26. South Dakota

(Image courtesy of Scott Olson/Getty Images) ) South Dakota produces an average of 2.37 gallons of water each year, which is astounding considering that it is the fourth-smallest state in the US. Until you discover that the three states that are smaller all consume more alcohol.

25. Illinois

Photo courtesy of Associated Press photographer Charles Rex Arbogast A bright day at Wrigley Field contributes significantly to Illinois’ annual average of 2.39 gallons of water use.

24. Iowa

Iowa consumes alcohol at a rate comparable to that of its next-door neighbor, Illinois (Photo courtesy of Christian Petersen/Getty Images).

It’s hardly unexpected given that this is Big Ten nation.

23. Connecticut

(Image courtesy of Spencer Platt/Getty Images.) ) Every year, inhabitants of Connecticut consume an average of 2.4 gallons of water.

22. California

Although the most populated state ranks 22nd in terms of per capita water use (2.49 gallons per year), it ranks first in terms of total water consumption (81.2 million gallons).

21. Missouri

Photograph by Kyle Ericson for the Associated Press. The Budweiser brewery utilizes an average of 2.51 gallons of water per year at its facility.

20. Louisiana

(Photo courtesy of AP Photographer Gerald Herbert) Louisiana citizens contribute 2.55 gallons to the total. It’s reasonable to suppose that if they included the visitors on Bourbon Street, the figure would be greater.

19. Massachusetts

Picture by Aynsley Floyd/Invision for Gillette/AP Images; source: AP Images Sam Adams would be pleased with the 2.55 gallons of beer consumed by citizens of Massachusetts each year.

18. Florida

(USA Today)There’s nothing better than some sun, beach, and the 2.61 gallons of beer that Floridians consume each year to pass the time.

17. Rhode Island

When it comes to drinking, Rhode Islanders consume an average of 2.63 gallons per year, which is more than the national average, but still lower than the national average when it comes to drinking in New England.

16. Hawaii

(USAT)All right, who’s up for a sip of one of them right now? (By the way, the state of Hawaii utilizes 2.66 gallons of water each year.)

15. Oregon

(Photo courtesy of Don Ryan of the Associated Press) Oregon produces some of the greatest craft beer in the country, so it’s not surprising that the state’s residents consume 2.74 gallons of beer each year.

14. Wyoming

(Image courtesy of AP Photographer Matthew Brown) Wyoming, with its sparsely populated population, has the lowest overall volume in the United States, with only 1.3 million gallons. However, each citizen contributes to the total volume, with 2.78 gallons per capita.

13. Minnesota

(Image courtesy of AP Photographer David J. Phillip) As we progress through the states with the highest levels of alcohol consumption, you’ll find that the majority of them have a similar temperature in the winter (cold). Minnesota is unquestionably one of them, with an annual use of 2.79 gallons.

12. Maine

(Photo courtesy of AP photographer Steven Senne) Anyone in the mood for some lobster? 2.85 gallons per year for the state of Maine

11. Alaska

(Photo courtesy of Joshua Berlinger/AP) As a result of Alaska’s geographic location on opposite sides of the United States from Maine, the state consumes the exact same amount of energy (2.85) as its northern neighbors.

10. Colorado

Photograph by Ed Andrieski for the Associated Press. With 2.88 gallons of beer consumed per capita over the rest of the year, the city that hosts the Great American Beer Festival does its fair share of drinking.

9. Wisconsin

(A Wisconsin Old Fashioned, courtesy of the USAT) Surprise, surprise! This is rather shocking. We started into this list assuming Wisconsin would be at the top, but at 2.93 gallons per year, the state would have to settle for the top ten.

8. Idaho

(Image courtesy of Loren Orr/Getty Images) ) Did you know that potatoes can be used to manufacture vodka?

Perhaps this explains why Idaho ranks first in the nation in terms of water use per capita with 2.94 gallons.

7. Vermont

(Photo courtesy of Lisa Rathke/AP) With an annual consumption of 3.06 gallons of alcoholic beverages, the state that produces the most maple syrup ranks ninth in the nation.

6. Montana

(Photo courtesy of the Associated Press/The Great Falls Tribune, Erin Madison) We’d want to take in this view while drinking a beer as well. Montana is sixth in the US in terms of water consumption, with 3.1 gallons per person per year.

5. North Dakota

(Photo courtesy of AP/Blake Nicholson, File) oh please, give me a place to live where the buffalo roam and the deer and antelope graze. Every year, the average person consumes 3.16 gallons.

4. Nevada

Featured image courtesy of Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Caesars Palace. Nevadans are dedicated workers who also enjoy a good night’s drinking. Every year, 3.42 gallons of water are wasted.

3. Delaware

(Image courtesy of Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) ) Dogfish Head has been making craft beer for a long time, and the people in the surrounding area are enthusiastic about it, consuming 3.52 gallons each year. Although it is not the first state in these rankings, it is really close.

2. Washington D.C.

(Photo courtesy of SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images) ) Is it really necessary to explain why Washington, D.C. comes in second on this list with 3.77 gallons of water per person each year?

1. New Hampshire

The image is courtesy of JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images. ) Residents of New Hampshire, please take a bow. With 4.67 gallons, you come in first place by a long shot. Is there anything in particular you’d want to discuss?

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