What Is Lambrusco Wine? (TOP 5 Tips)

Lambrusco is a slightly sparkling (frizzante) red wine produced in Italy, with roots dating back to Etruscan and Roman times. Although red lambrusco is by far the most common style, the wine is also made in rosé format, as well.

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Is Lambrusco a sweet wine?

Lambrusco comes in both sweet and dry styles. “Despite being known for a very sweet style, Lambrusco makes terrific dry and off-dry wines in addition to the very sweet [blend].” Regardless of its sweetness, this wine is always lightly sparkling, making it an ideal red wine for a celebratory holiday meal.

Is Lambrusco wine or Champagne?

By definition, true champagne is only produced in the Champagne region of France. Different types of sparkling wine like prosecco, cava, crémant, moscato, and lambrusco comprise the rest of the market.

What is Lambrusco similar to?

Other Sweet Sparkling Reds from Italy Besides Lambrusco and Brachetto, different regions in Italy produce sweet red wines with their unique indigenous red varieties. For example, Bonarda, Teroldego and Croatina are wine grapes found in Lombardy. These wines are a bubbly and sweet (“frizzante dolce”) style.

Is Lambrusco a sparkling?

Lambrusco. Lambrusco, which is probably the best-known style of sparkling red wine, is from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and is made from the Lambrusco grape.

Does Lambrusco have a lot of sugar?

A lambrusco will be labeled to help you decipher the sugar content and sweetness of the wine. Wines labeled secco (dry) can have up to 15 g/L of residual sugar, but they taste dry because the sugar is balanced by acidity and bubbles.

What is the alcohol content of Lambrusco?

Lambrusco wine is a mix of several of the grape varieties, as each has a specific flavor profile. Similar to other Italian sparkling wines (like our friend Prosecco) Lambrusco has high levels of acidity, and low to medium alcohol levels at around 10-11.5% ABV.

What wine is closest to Lambrusco?

Merlot is very versatile in the combinations and fits well with every kind of meat, especially red meat, but also with courses based on porcino mushrooms. Compared to Lambrusco, Merlot has a drier and flavour, pleasantly soft, with a slightly bitter or herbaceous aftertaste.

Is Lambrusco similar to prosecco?

It’s made the same way as Champagne, though. So, you know—everything’s sparkling. Lambrusco has become increasingly popular over the years—it’s an Italian sparkling red wine. The Italian sparkling wine is a bit sweeter than prosecco, as it’s made from the Moscato grape in the province of Asti.

What’s the difference between Lambrusco and prosecco?

Prosecco is a dry white, strongly sparkling wine (spumante) from Veneto usually served as aperitivo or with antipasto. Lambrusco is a dry or moderately sweet deep-red and moderately sparkling wine produced in Emilia and which is served with the whole meal. The two can’t be compared.

Is Lambrusco a Merlot?

Lambrusco wine is made from the Lambrusco grape. The name isn’t regionally protected, like Champagne or Merlot, though the grape is native to the Emilia-Romagna region. Similar to rosé, Lambrusco is also considered an easy-drinking wine that pairs well with a number of foods.

Is Lambrusco a healthy red wine?

Lambrusco, as all red wines, is excellent antioxidant, which can help to block the growth of cells that cause cancer. The action of resveratrol reduces the possibility that the oestrogen hormone converts into a cancer to breast.

What is the most expensive sweet red wine?

Banyuls and Maury Doux are the most valuable and age-worthy vins doux naturels. You could sell these on the secondary market for a profit. While they’re not quite as valuable as vintage port, the rarest bottles are still sought-after among collectors.

How is Lambrusco served?

It’s a fruit-forward sparkling red—from the Italian Lambrusco grape— always served chilled.

Is Lambrusco popular in Italy?

The family of Lambrusco is the most widespread family of vines in the Emilian country, from which fragrant grapes, you can obtain a deeply pleasant and versatile wine, to the point to be the most exported all over the world.

How strong is Lambrusco?

Lambrusco is an everyday wine. Plus, its low alcohol content (around 8%) means it works well as an everyday dinner drink.

What Is Lambrusco and Why You Need to Drink It This Summer

Signature Cellars provided the image. If you’re a fan of red wine (and who isn’t? ), you probably drink less of it in the summer and more of it in the winter, as the seasons change. That’s just how things work: a glass of Pinot Grigio sounds nicer when you’re snuggled up by a fire than it does when you’re sweating by the pool. Because people were craving a refreshing summer beverage, rosé sales skyrocketed 53 percent when it first became popular in 2017. It’s like pink water for the summer. Lambrusco, on the other hand, is an even better choice when it comes to drinking.

What is Lambrusco?

It’s a fruity sparkling red wine made from the Italian Lambrusco grape that’s always best served cold. It’s Italy’s most popular export wine, and it’s bubbly and ultra-refreshing. Lambrusco grapes, according to some historians, were the very first grapes to be used to make wine in Italy. It is a variety of grapes that are grown in the Emilia-Romagna area. By the end of the 1960s, the drink had gained widespread acceptance in virtually every region of the country. The Emilia-Romagna area is famed for a variety of grape varieties, but Lambrusco is the most well-known.

Thirteen of the 60 Lambrusco grape types are indigenous to this area of Italy, out of a total of 60.

  • Its floral-forward, intense taste distinguishes this Lambrusco di Sorbara from the rest of the pack.
  • Lambrusco di Salamino: This version of the Lambrusco has a richer ruby hue and a more intense purple fizz.
  • Both semi-sweet and dry variants are available.
  • It has a fuller body and greater alcohol content than the other varieties.
  • Lambrusco has been around for a long time!
  • Lambrusco wines can range in sweetness from extremely sweet (and syrupy) to completely dry.

Only in the mid-aughts did dry Lambrusco (the type you’ll always find in our refrigerator) make its way into domestic wine shops. Dry Lambrusco is undergoing a renaissance right now. Here are some of the reasons why you should be drinking it:

1. It’s sparkling—but nottoosparkling.

Lambrusco, in contrast to champagne, does not have a high concentration of bubbles that makes wine difficult to drink. It’s frrizzante — a little sparkly — and won’t make your throat burn like other drinks. Photographs courtesy of Getty Images

2. It goes perfectly with ALL food.

The days of getting the side-eye at a restaurant for ordering a Sauv Blanc with your steak are over. Lambruscos, which are becoming increasingly popular, are a delicious wine to pair with a variety of dishes. Food from Italy (pasta, salty cheeses, cured meats) is a given, but the fizz of the wine also helps to cut through fried dishes such as fried chicken and French fries. Additionally, we enjoy pairing it with heartier meats such as grilled steak and roast chicken. What is the most enjoyable aspect of Lambrusco?

3. It’s SO drinkable.

It has been known for some of us in the Delish crew to drink an entire bottle of Lambrusco to themselves (oops), only for the reason that it is as easy to drink as water. Once you get started, it’s difficult to quit. Lindsay Funston is the Executive Editor of the magazine. With more than a decade of expertise tasting everything from pickles to bloody marys, writing on food trends, and developing simple recipes, Lindsay Funston is a food editor. This material was generated and maintained by a third party and imported onto this website in order to assist users in providing their email addresses for further consideration.

Lambrusco Wine Information

Grapes from the Lambrusco Maestri vineyards Lambrusco is a vibrantly colored grape type grown in Emilia-Romagna, northern Italy, and used to produce sparkling red wines. Rather than a single grape variety, it is a collective designation for a group of grape types similar to Muscat. So far, more than 60 different Lambrusco varieties have been identified. It is also linked with the fruity, light-hearted sparkling reds produced in central-northern Italy, which are now synonymous with the region.

  • Originally, the term referred to a ‘wild vine’ (similar to labrusca), but it has now come to refer to a variety of grape varietals and their clones.
  • Eventually the word evolved to reflect not just grape varietals, but also the wine styles generated from those kinds as a result of this expansion.
  • These stretch from Piedmont (the neighboring region of Emilia-Romagna) in the north to Basilicata in the south.
  • For the most part, this was due to mass manufacturing for key markets in the 1980s, primarily the United States and northern Europe.
  • The majority of wines with the Lambrusco appellation are now produced in vast quantities and undergo secondary fermentation in massive steel tanks.
  • It was necessary to use this method because the popularity of Lambrusco rose so swiftly in the 1980s that it was the only option to produce the requisite volumes quickly and affordably enough for them to remain reasonably priced.
  • Depending on how long they are left to mature to full phenolic maturity, they can produce a wine that is as powerfully scented as it is colored.

Winemakers utilize the Ancellotta grape to add depth and color to the type of watery, overcropped Lambrusco that is produced when yields are allowed to spiral out of control.

This is true for both theLambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro and theLambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce, which both have a varietal minimum of 85 percent.

It’s worth noting that Lambrusco Mantovanoi is the other DOC having the word Lambrusco in it.

In addition to ModenaDOC (which was established in 2009) and Reggiano, which was once known as Lambrusco di Reggiano, there are other appellations that produce Lambrusco wines.

In addition to being produced in its home region of Emilia-Romagna, the Lmbrusco Maestri is also grown in Basilicata, which is a little further south.

Montericco is another cultivar that is cultivated in the Emilia-Romagna region surrounding the town of the same name. Selvatica and Salvatica are two more names for this plant. Lambrusco pairs well with a variety of foods, including:

  • Prosciutto di Parma (cured ham)
  • Prosciutto di Parma (cured ham)
  • Thanksgiving dinner: Roasted turkey with cranberry sauce, cherry pie

Learn About Sparkling Red Lambrusco Wine

Lambrusco is a family of red grapes that originates in the Emilia-Romagna area of Italy and is most usually associated with the production of a sparkling red wine of the same name. Due to its long history, it is one of the earliest wines produced in Italy, going back to the Bronze Age. Lambrusco is available in a variety of flavors, ranging from dry to sweet, and in a range of colors, ranging from light red to deep inky purple in hue. It is often created in an afrizzante (lightly effervescent) style and contains a modest amount of alcohol compared to other wines.

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Fast Facts

  • Emilia-Romagna and Lombardy are two regions in Italy. Its place of origin is Emilia Romagna, Italy. Sweetness ranges from extremely sweet to extremely dry
  • Color: A light to dark brilliant red ranging from light to dark

Taste and Flavor Profile

Lambrusco is offered in three different styles: dry (secco), semi-sweet (semisecco), and sweet (dulce). Generally speaking, the greatest wines are secco or semisecco, while the cheaper, lower-quality lambruscos are typically too sweet in comparison. The taste profile, as well as other qualities such as tannins, acidity, and color, might differ depending on the style. Overall, the tastes of lambrusco are dominated by berries such as blackberry, boysenberry, raspberry, and strawberry, as well as dark cherry and sour cherry.

The nose can have notes of raisin, almond, spice, and ripe fruit, among other things.

While most lambrusco types have a sharp acidity, the acidity is more evident in the lighter-style lambrusco varietals.

How to Taste Wine

When tasting wine, there are a few procedures you should take to guarantee you get the greatest experience possible:

  1. Take a careful look at the wine, paying attention to the color and opacity, as well as the bubbles that are visible through the glass
  2. And Take a brief whiff to get a sense of what it smells like. Don’t twirl your glass of sparkling champagne around in your hands. After that, insert your nose into the wine glass and take a deep breath, soaking in your first impressions of the beverage
  3. Taste: Take a little sip and allow it to roll about in your tongue for a few seconds. When tasting for the first time, take notice of the acidity, sugar, tannins, and alcohol concentration, then go on to the taste notes (berries, spice, oak), and lastly the finish.

Grapes and Wine Regions

It is incredibly versatile due to the fact that the lambrusco grape is so old and was grown thousands of years ago from a wild vine, and it thrives in the hillsides and plains of northern Italy. Like most wine grapes, lambrusco prefers a balanced amount of moisture and sunlight, and the soil and growth conditions that are best for each specific lambrusco cultivar vary. Lambrusco grapes are picked in the fall after being gathered in the spring and summer. Despite the fact that there are over 60 recognized types of lambrusco grapes, just a handful are widely employed in the production of wine.

The regions are as follows:

  • This regional lambrusco is produced in the province of Modena and is the only kind of lambrusco that can be grown on hillside soil. Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro: Produced in the province of Modena and the only type of lambrusco that can be grown on hillside soil. In the end, the wine tastes more like a true red wine, with a bright but evanescent sparkle, a very noticeable fruity fragrance, and a substantial tannic structure
  • Nonetheless, it is less expensive. Wine made in the region of Modena, Lambrusco di Sorbara is a red wine whose vines flourish in sandy plains soil. Featuring a light ruby red color and fresh fruitiness, this lambrusco boasts a sharp acidity that persists through to the finish. In addition to being mixed with other wines, Salamino di Santa Croce is widely used to produce off-dry and sweet wines, as well as sparkling wines. When cultivated in the clay and rock soils of Reggio Emilia and used to create dry wine, it produces vivid wines with a well-balanced acidity
  • When used to make dessert wines, it produces vibrant wines with a well-balanced acidity. Lambrusco Reggiano: This sparkling red wine can be prepared from a variety of lambrusco grapes, including a blend of several varieties. It is possible for Reggiano lambruscos to have a broad range of flavor notes due to the fact that the mixes and winemaking process may vary so drastically. Lambrusco Mantovano: Montovano is the only DOC-designated lambrusco produced outside of the Emilia-Romagna area. It is farmed in the Lombardy region. According to the mix used and the winemaker, the precise qualities of the wine vary.

Food Pairings

This regional lambrusco is produced in the province of Modena and is the only kind of lambrusco that can be grown on hillside soil. Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro: Produced in the province of Modena and the only type of lambrusco that can grow on hillside soil. In the end, the wine tastes more like a true red wine, with a vibrant but fleeting sparkle, a very distinct fruity fragrance, and a substantial tannic structure. Wine made in the region of Modena, Lambrusco di Sorbara is a red wine whose vines grow in sandy plains soil.

In addition to being combined with other wines, Salamino di Santa Croce is widely used to produce off-dry and sweet wines, as well as fortified wines.

Wine manufactured from a blend of lambrusco grapes, Lambrusco Reggiano is a sparkling red wine produced in Italy.

In Lombardy, lambrusco Mantovano is produced, making it the only DOC-designated lambrusco produced outside of the Emilia-Romagna area.

According to the mix used and the winemaker, the precise qualities of the wine differ.

Key Producers, Brands, and Buying Tips

Most well-stocked wine stores have at least one or two lambrusco wines, and many others may be purchased or supplied directly to the customer. Because it is so easy to pair with pizza and pasta, the wine appears on the menus of many modern Italian restaurants today. Generally speaking, most lambruscos are priced around $20, with quality improving significantly in the $15 to $20 price range. If you can’t locate lambrusco, try a dry sparkling shiraz from Australia, which is similar to lambrusco.

  • Most well-stocked wine stores have at least one or two lambrusco wines, and many others may be bought or brought directly to your door. As a result of its easy matching with pizza and pasta, the wine appears on many current Italian restaurant menus. In the $15 to $20 range, the quality of lambruscos improves noticeably, with most being priced around $20 on average. Try a dry sparkling shiraz from Australia in place of the lambrusco if you can’t locate it in your local market.

How to Choose a Lambrusco Wine, Italy’s Iconic Red Bubbly

Most well-stocked wine stores have at least one or two lambrusco wines, and many more may be purchased or sent. Because it is so simple to match with pizza and pasta, the wine appears on the menus of many modern Italian restaurants. The majority of lambruscos are around $20, with the quality growing significantly in the $15 to $20 price range. If you can’t get lambrusco, try a dry sparkling shiraz from Australia, which is a good substitute.

What Is Lambrusco Wine?

Lambrusco is nearly entirely made in Italy, and it is a liqueur. When it comes to sparkling red wine, the Italians are still major lovers, even if the rest of the world is taking its time to forget about its bad image. Throughout northern Italy, it is not uncommon to see residents enjoying a glass of this frothy red wine. Lambrusco, on the other hand, has struggled to shed its reputation as a cheap, sickly drink outside of Italy, thanks to the wine boom of the 1970s. We’re here to tell you that a second glass of Lambrusco is absolutely in your future.

Many of them are a rich purplish-red color, while others are as light as rosé.

The six most often encountered are as follows:

  • There is Lambrusco Grasparossa, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Marani, Lambrusco Montericco, and Lambrusco Salamino, but there is also Lambrusco di Sorbara, and there is also Lambrusco di Sorbara.

Due to the fact that each grape variety has a distinct flavor character, lambrusco wine is a blend of several different grape varietals. With strong levels of acidity, Lambrusco is similar to other Italian sparkling wines (such as our buddy Prosecco), while having low to medium alcohol levels (about 10-11.5 percent alcohol by volume). Lambrusco, on the other hand, contains greater amounts of tannins than other wines since the red grape skins are left intact during the production process.

Where Is Lambrusco Wine Produced?

The majority of Lambrusco is produced in northern Italy, with a few (very small) vineyards in Australia and Argentina completing the picture. Emilia-Romagna is the wine’s birthplace, and it is a lovely region that is also known for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, balsamic vinegar, and Prosciutto di Parma. It’s like the entire region is begging to be transformed into a lavish picnic!

Types of Lambrusco Wine

Lambrusco is available in a number of different kinds, each with its own particular flavor and flair. Here are a few famous examples that illustrate my point.

Lambrusco Salamino

Typically, semisecco (semi-sweet) or dolce Lambrusco are the styles of Lambrusco that are created (sweet).

With a rich crimson hue and red fruit tastes, this wine is a standout.

Lambrusco di Sorbara

Typically, semisecco (semi-sweet) or dolce Lambrusco are the styles of Lambrusco made (sweet). With a rich crimson color and red fruit tastes, this wine is a standout amongst the crowd.

Lambrusco Grasparossa

For those who prefer strong, richly colored wines with high tannin content, Grasparossa is the wine for you. Tastes like blackcurrants and other rich fruit tastes, which are characteristic to lambruscos in this region.

Lambrusco Mantovano

Mantovano, in contrast to the rest of the wines mentioned in this article, is not made in Emilia-Romagna, but rather in the province of Lombardy where it is grown. This Lambrusco is often served secco (dry).

How Is Lambrusco Wine Made?

Lambrusco is manufactured in the same manner as other sparkling wines are made: by fermenting grape must. Red grape skins, on the other hand, are not removed during the maturing process, as is the case with white sparkling wines. The contact with the skins imparts a deep crimson color to the wine as well as a high level of tannic acidity. Once this straightforward wine has been made, the winemaker will need to make it fizzy by subjecting it to a second fermentation. The Charmat technique, in which the sugar and yeast are fed to the wine in a huge metal tank, is the most often used way for accomplishing this.

Following that, the winemaker adds a sweet wine mixture known as a dosage, which sweetens the wine while also adjusting the acidity level.

It will be more common for sweeter types to have a larger dose, and less common for dry styles.

Lambrusco wines produced using this type of winemaking are not as bubbly as certain sparkling wines, such as Cava or Champagne, but they are nevertheless enjoyable.

What Does Lambrusco Wine Taste Like?

While dry Lambruscos, such as Lambrusco di Sorbara, are characterized by floral notes such of violets and orange flower, sweeter varieties, such as Lambrusco Salamino, are characterized by distinct cherry flavor notes. However, if you’re drinking Lambrusco for the first time and aren’t sure what kind it is, you may anticipate to experience berry tastes such as strawberry and blackcurrant, if you’re not familiar with the grape. There may also be hints of rhubarb and perhaps potting dirt in the aroma.

How to Serve Lambrusco Wine

When it comes to reliable matching possibilities, Look to the cuisine of Lambrusco’s native Italy for inspiration. Lambrusco has a strong acidity, which makes it an excellent choice for pairing with creamy prosciutto. The fresh, zingy tastes cut straight through the fat and won’t overpower the intensely cured meat that you’re serving. Maintaining the meaty theme, a charcuterie platter is another excellent choice for serving with Lambrusco. Just make sure you use Italian meats such as asfinocchiona or veal chops (fennel salami).

Alternatively, go for something straightforward like pizza and Lambrusco – the two are made to be together.

The ideal temperature ranges between 45 and 55 degrees Fahrenheit, so place it in the refrigerator for an hour or two before serving, then remove it from the fridge 15 minutes before serving.

A universal wine glass is ideal, but even a basic white wine glass can suffice in this situation.

As you can see, this easy-to-drink wine is meant to be enjoyed with friends and family over lunch. And, after all, why not? As a result of the low alcohol concentration, you may drink one or two glasses and yet have enough energy to go through the remainder of the day.

Paint the Town Red

Lambrusco is a fantastic choice for anybody wishing to spice up their sparkling wine collection with a little something different. Not only is this bubbly red low in alcohol and high in acidity, but it also comes in a variety of styles to experiment with. Even if some wine connoisseurs have turned their backs on Lambrusco, you should give this Italian horse a try nevertheless. Just keep in mind that you are not required to drink it sweet. There are drier styles available on the market; you may just have to look a little harder for them.

It goes well with Italian cured meats, pizza, and a meaty BBQ, and it’s a great choice for a casual evening out.

Lambrusco Wines Worth Drinking

When you extol the virtues of Lambrusco in a noisy manner, you may be rebuked with phrases such as “You mean that cheap, sugary red wine that tastes like soda?” Well, not precisely, but that one is correct. Since tarnishing its reputation over 40 years ago, it appears that Lambrusco has a long way to go before it can reclaim its former glory (blame the wine boom of the 1970s). Fortunately, this means that you may buy excellent wines at ridiculously low costs as a result. Lambrusco is fantastic, and the story behind it is even more intriguing than you might expect.

  1. The majority of wines are blends of multiple diverse varietals, each with its own particular flavor character.
  2. As a result, when you drink Lambrusco, you are actually sipping some old-fashioned juice (several millennia older than Cabernet).
  3. Having said that, there are four high-quality kinds of Lambrusco that you should be familiar with: Lambrusco di Sorbara, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Grasparossa, and Lambrusco Salamino, among others.
  4. Purchase the book and receive the course!
  5. Read on to find out more Lambrusco di Sorbara, the lightest and most flowery of the Lambrusco grapes, is the perfect complement to any meal.

Classy Lambrusco Wines to Try

Lambrusco wines made from this grape are the lightest, most delicate, most flowery of all the Lambrusco wines, generally with a pale, pink-rose tint. Best variants are dry and refreshing in style, but feature pleasantly fragrant fragrances of orange blossom, mandarin orange, cherries, violets, and watermelon, among other fruits and flowers.

Wines from this region are usually referred to as Lambrusco di Sorbara, and they match very well with spicy Thai and Indian cuisines.

Lambrusco Grasparossa

This is the vine that produces the fiercest Lambrusco wines, with aromas of black currant and blueberries that are backed by relatively high, mouth-drying tannin and a balanced creaminess that comes from the Charmat sparkling wine manufacturing technique, among other characteristics. It is branded as Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro (which means it contains 85 percent of this grape) and is a fantastic match with fennel-infused sausages, lasagna or even barbecued ribs, to name a few dishes.

Lambrusco Maestri

It is more grapey in character, with delicate and creamy bubbles and faint hints of milk chocolate in the wines of Lambrusco Maestri. Among all of the Lambrusco types, L. Maestri is the most widely travelled, and there are some superb specimens coming out of Australia (Adelaide Hills) and Argentina (Mendoza). The search for single-varietal Lambrusco Maestri in Italy is a little more difficult, but according to Italian wine specialist Ian d’Agata, “Try: Cantine Ceci, Nero di Lambrusco Otello, which is certain to alter your mind about Lambrusco forever and make you into a believer.” Ian d’Agata,Native Wine Grapes of Italy, by Ian d’Agata.

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Lambrusco Salamino

The bunches of this Lambrusco are formed like salamis and are cylindrical in shape (which is what the grape is named after). They combine the fragrant attributes of Lambrusco di Sorbara (think cherries and violets) with the structure (tannin), creaminess, and rich color of Lambrusco Grasparossa to create a delicious blend. Lambrusco Salamino will be prepared in the sweetest styles, such as semisecco and dolce, to temper the tannin in the wine – interestingly enough, the sweetness makes it an excellent match for burgers and other meat dishes.

This organic Lambrusco wine is prepared from a combination of grapes from the L.

Maestri, L.

Marani vineyards.

Last Word: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

The bulk of Lambrusco is produced in Emilia-Romagna, a region in Italy that is known for producing a variety of delectable treats such as truffles. Emilia-Romagna is known for its specialties such as balsamic vinegar from Modena, prosciutto di Parma, and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. It just so happens that a dry or off-dry Lambrusco wine with firm acidity is the ideal pairing for these handcrafted jewels from the region. Serve a Lambrusco alongside your next charcuterie and cheese spread for a pairing that is good enough for the locals to enjoy.

Taste the Rainbow

We made a wine taste chart that is intended to assist individuals in practicing detecting flavors in wine and understanding where those sensations originate. Take advantage of this offer and start tasting like an expert right away! Chart of Wine Flavors

Lambrusco – Wikipedia

Colorino is a wine grape grown in Tuscany that is also known as Lambrusco. See Abrusco for information on another Tuscan wine grape that is also named as Lambrusco. A glass of Lambrusco, please (Grasparossaversion). Lambrusco (;Italian:) is the name of both an Italian red wine grape and a wine that is mostly derived from the aforementioned grape. The grapes and wine are sourced from four different regions in Emilia-Romagna and one in Lombardy, primarily in and around the central provinces of Modena, Parma, Reggio-Emilia, and Mantua, respectively.

Lombroso was highly prized in ancient Rome because of its production and huge yields, with Cato the Elder claiming that the output from just two-thirds of an acre could produce enough wine to fill 300amphoras.

It was also produced in a white and rosé style during that time period, which was achieved by restricting skin contact with the must.

Grape

The fizz of “Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro” in a glass of “Lambrusco” Lambrusco Grasparossa, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Marani, Lambrusco Montericco, Lambrusco Salamino, and Lambrusco Sorbara are the six Lambrusco kinds that are most usually seen in the marketplace. All of these different Lambrusco grape varieties are indigenous to Emilia and are neither clones or sub-clones of one another. Typically, more than one Lambrusco variety is used in the production of the wine, which is then blended with a number of particular blending grapes (up to 15 percent of the total) such as Ancellotta (for color), Marzemino, Malbo Gentile, Cabernet Sauvignon (for body and structure), and others.

Historically, vines were taught to climb up poplartrees to provide support.

When the Lambrusco grape is not fermented sweet, it may produce a delicious dry wine with strawberry aromas and a faint bitter aftertaste, which is very appealing.

Lambrusco Salamino is the most extensively planted variety in the world.

Italian wine

The fizz of “Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro” in a glass of apricot nectar Lambrusco Grasparossa, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Marani, Lambrusco Montericco, Lambrusco Salamino, and Lambrusco Sorbara are the six Lambrusco types that are most widely found in wineries around the globe. There are no clones or sub-clones of any of these different Lambrusco grapes; they are all indigenous to Emilia. The majority of Lambruscos are created from more than one Lambrusco type, and they are also frequently blended with a number of particular blending grapes (up to 15%), such as Ancellotta (for color), Marzemino, Malbo Gentile, Cabernet Sauvignon (for body and structure), and others.

Vines were traditionally taught to climb up poplartrees, but this is no longer the case.

In its dry form, the Lambrusco grape may produce a delicious dry wine with strawberry aromas and a faint bitter aftertaste if it is not fermented in sugar.

By the end of the twentieth century, ampelographers had discovered over 60 different variations of Lambrusco, which were found all throughout Italy, including Piedmont, Sicily, and the Veneto region. Lambrusco Salamino is the most extensively cultivated cultivar.

Wine regions

  • Castelvetro Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro is the smallest wine-producing area in Italy and is located south of the city of Modena. The region is home to Grasparossa, a wine for which the DOC demands that at least 85 percent of the wine be constituted of lambrusco. A deep purplish-red hue is characteristic of the wine produced in this region, which is often dry and full-bodied. Grasparossa yields the most tannicLambrusco of all the grapes. Lambrusco Mantovano- The only Lambrusco area outside of Emilia Romagna, and the only Lambrusco region in the Lombardy region. Lambrusco Reggiano- This is the most important producing region of Lambrusco and the source of the majority of the exported DOC classified wines. Lambrusco di Montalcino- This is the most important producing region of Lambrusco di Montalcino. Maestri, Marani, Montericco, and Salamino are the four grape varieties that may be used to make Lambrusco. In addition, up to 15 percent of additional Ancellotta grapes are authorized in the DOC. Wines from this region must be composed of at least 90 percent of the local Salamino grape, which is typically light bodied and frizzante in style. Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce- Located 7 miles (11 km) west of the village of Santa Croce, the wines from this region must be composed of at least 90 percent of the local Salamino grape
  • Lambrusco Salamino di Santa Croce- The wines are often light in color and body, with a frizzante style that may be created in both semi-sweet and dry styles, as well as in both semi-sweet and dry varieties. Lambrusco di Sorbara- Located north of Modena near the village of Sorbara, Sorbara is generally regarded as the highest quality variety producing the most fragrant wines. It has some similarities to Lambrusco Salamino, but produces a darker and fuller-bodied wine. Lambrusco di Sorbara is a red wine produced from the grapes of the Lambrusco Salamino variety. From a bright ruby red to a purple tint, the color can vary greatly. Sorbara and Salamino are the only grapes allowed in the DOC-designated wines produced in this wine area, with at least 60% of the blend having to be Sorbara. The Salamino and Sorbara grape varietals are known for producing wines that are high in acidity. Sorbara’s ability to produce the greatest quality Lambrusco is attributed to the vine’s inclination to shed its blooms, which limits fruit yields and concentrates tastes, as well as to its tendency to produce the highest quality grapes.

Other regions

The name “Lambrusco” refers to a variety of low-cost bottled and boxed wines produced by Australian vineyards and sold in Australia. They are generally medium-sweet, have a low alcohol content (about 10 percent), and are marketed as a “easy drinking” beverage. Lambrusco Maestri is a grape variety grown in Argentina on several hundred hectares of land.

References

  • The Consortium for the Preservation of the Historic Mark of Modenese Lambrusco
  • Eric Asimov’s “Lambrusco, No Joke,” published in the New York Times on July 26, 2006
  • A map of Emilia-Romagna with information on Lambrusco wine

Tired of Rosé? Here’s An Even Prettier New Wine for You to Try

Photographs courtesy of Getty Images Known as “Party in a Bottle,” Lambrusco is one of Italy’s most refreshing and food-friendly red wines, and it’s a party in a bottle. Known as both the grape and the authorized growing areas in which it is produced, Lambrusco comes from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy, which is located in the northeastern corner of the country. The fact that this wine is so food-friendly comes as no surprise given the fact that you’re probably already familiar with several other fantastic delights from this same gourmet region, such as Modena balsamic vinegar, prosciutto, and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, among others.

  1. Seriously.
  2. Lambrusco, which is meant to be served slightly cold, blends the fruitiness of a young red wine such as Barbera with the crisp bubbles of a dry Champagne, resulting in a wine that is extremely adaptable and pleasantly enjoyable in any situation.
  3. These wines also tend to have an amazingly gorgeous violet-like or fruity scent, which allows for a full sensory experience when sipping on them.
  4. Editor’s Choice No.
  5. This wine, which is medium-dry and with flavors of raspberries, black cherry, and violet, is the kind of thing we want to drink all fall long.
  6. More: Try These Funky-Fresh Natural Wines for a Unique Experience Next Lambrusco Rosé from the 2Lini 910 “Labrusca” vineyard.
  7. If you enjoy sparkling rosé but are searching for a bubbly with more depth and structure to take you through the transition to fall, this is your new go-to bottle of bubbly.

A vibrant and delicious Lambrusco di Sorbara with a lovely rose colour, nearly comparable to a rosé wine, this Lambrusco di Sorbara is a delight to drink.

Lambrusco Reggiano Concerto by the 4Medici Ermete Its flavors of cherries, raspberries, and white pepper are complemented with a ruby-red tint and a robust and energetic style.

5Cleto Chiarli Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile (Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro Amabile) This smooth, semi-sweet, very fruity Lambrusco is almost too drinkable to be believed.

Prosciutto and melon, sharp cheeses, your favorite light pasta meal, and dessert go perfectly with this crowd-pleasing Lambrusco.

This wine, which is deep crimson in color and bursting with blueberry and blackcurrant taste, should be served with a slight chill and combined with spicy, smoky, and savory foods.

It has a silky fizz and a spicy dryness that makes it a perfect summer drink.

Lambrusco Rosso 8Lini 910 “Labrusca” Lambrusco Rosso You should choose this man if you’re bringing a bottle of Lambrusco to a gathering.

Combining it with pepperoni pizza or homemade minestrone soup is a great idea, but you can also eat it on its own without pairing it with anything.

Pierre is a model and actress.

Her writing has also appeared on Thrillist, FoodWine, and Delish, among other publications.

This material was generated and maintained by a third party and imported onto this website in order to assist users in providing their email addresses for further consideration. You may be able to discover further information on this and other related items at the website piano.io.

What is Lambrusco—and Why It Could Be the Perfect Thanksgiving Red Wine

In the opinion of the sommeliers we spoke with, Lambrusco is one of the greatest wines to serve for a holiday toast or to enjoy with a six-course dinner. When it comes to Thanksgiving meal, there’s no better way to celebrate than with a refreshing, versatilered wine. Lambrusco is one of the greatest wines to serve for a holiday toast or to drink while dining on a six-course dinner, say the sommeliers we talked with. In the words of Jeremy Allen, general manager and sommelier of the MiniBar Hollywood in Los Angeles, “Lambrusco is for everyone,” which is one of the reasons it’s a great wine to serve when you’re expecting a large number of guests.

You’ll be toasting with this earthy, fizzy wine in no time if you follow these guidelines.

image courtesy of skynesher/Getty Images

Lambrusco comes in both sweet and dry styles.

In the words of Ronald Buyukliev, lead sommelier at Estiatorio Milos Las Vegas, “Lambrusco is more than just a sweet wine.” “Despite the fact that Lambrusco is most recognized for its extremely sweet style, it also produces excellent dry and off-dry wines in addition to the extremely sweet.” Regardless of how sweet the wine is, it is always mildly effervescent, making it an excellent red wine to serve with a festive holiday feast.

There are more than 60 varieties in the Lambrusco family of grape.

In the words of Ronald Buyukliev, head sommelier at Estiatorio Milos Las Vegas, “Lambrusco is more than just a sweet wine.” Although Lambrusco is most recognized for its extremely sweet flavor, the region also produces excellent dry and off-dry wines, in addition to the extremely sweet. Regardless of how sweet the wine is, it is always mildly effervescent, making it an excellent red wine to serve with a festive holiday dinner.

Its name and alcohol content reveals whether it’s sweet or dry.

Lambrusco is available in both sweet and dry varieties, but how can you distinguish between the two? “If you want something sweet, search for the term ‘dolce,'” Allen advises, “and if you want something dry, look at the alcohol concentration of the beverage.” According to Allen, the driest Lambrusco varietals contain an alcohol by volume (ABV) of 11.5 percent or greater. Compared to the ones around 8 percent, “they’re going to be drier,” Allen predicts.

It pairs best with foods from Emilia-Romagna.

Take a look at the region where Lambrusco is produced, Emilia Romagna, and you’ll see why this wine was created to be enjoyed with food. In addition, cities like Bologna, Modena, Parma, and Reggia—all of which are home to some of the world’s best meats and cheeses—are located in the region, and it is these foods that are the best match for this wine, according to Karen Van Guilder Little, general manager and sommelier of Josephin Nashville. Van Guilder Little’s menu includes “parmesan cheese, hams, and balsamic vinegar.” “During the Christmas season, these items are frequently served as first courses or hors d’oeuvres.” However, she also points out that “the strong red fruit tastes of dry Lambrusco, such as cherry and strawberry, would pair well with game birds, turkey, and ham,” according to her.

It’s a kind of wine thatshouldcost more than $10.

Despite the fact that you can get a Lambrusco for $10, Buyukliev cautions that it is not always a wine you’ll like drinking. The expert advises that “anything under the $10 threshold in the retail world is typically better to be avoided.” As Buyukliev points out, “Lambrusco wines in the $10 to $20 range are only a few dollars more expensive than comparable wines in the same price range, but they represent a huge leap in quality.”

What is Lambrusco?

What exactly is Lambrusco? Lambrusco is an Italian grape variety that is used to make red wine, and it is also the name of the wine that is produced by this grape variety. The Lambrusco grape is a kind of red wine produced in Italy. The Lambrusco grape was claimed to have produced a large amount of fruit and was highly prized for its ability to produce high-quality wine during the Roman era. There are about 60 different varieties of the Lambrusco grape that have been recognized throughout Italy; the major six are as follows:

  • There are several varieties of Lambrusco, including: Lambrusco Grasparossa, Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Marani, Lambrusco Monterico, Lambrusco Salamino, and Lambrusco Sorbara.

The vast majority of Lambrusco wines are produced from a blend of more than one Lambrusco grape type, with the addition of up to 15% of additional specified blending grapes allowed in certain circumstances. Is it necessary for Lambrusco to be red? Lambrusco can be a white wine, a red wine, or even a rosé wine, depending on the region. Sweet Lambrusco rose to become the best-selling imported wine in the United States throughout the 1970s and 1980s. It was also one of the first Italian wines to be successfully exported outside of Italy, with over 13 million cases sent to the United States alone in the year 1985.

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In fact, although Italy is the primary producer, Lambrusco is also produced in Australia and Argentina.

Lambrusco is commonly seen as a low-quality wine due to its low price, but this is not always the case; just because Lambrusco is less expensive does not necessarily imply that it will taste inferior; here are five excellent examples from Italy to prove this point.

The Lambruscos

Cantine Ceci Spa Terre Verdiane Lambrusco Amabile (Cantine Ceci Spa Terre Verdiane Lambrusco Amabile) Cantine Ceci Spa– Terre Verdiane Lambrusco Amabile–Tasting Notes Aromas–”A sparkling silky feeling on the mouth, with dark cherry fruits.” Cantine Ceci Spa– Terre Verdiane Lambrusco Amabile–Tasting Notes Flavors – “There is a slight sweetness to the black cherry flavors,” says the winemaker. During the World’s Finest Glass of Bubbly Awards 2019, thisLambrusco was awarded a Gold Medal in theSummer DaysCategory.

The flavors are described as follows: “At first creamy with blackcurrants, then a dryness in the length.” During the World’s Finest Glass of Bubbly Awards 2019, thisLambrusco was awarded aSilver Medal in theGastronomicCategory.

On the nose, there’s a blend of strawberry tart and deeper red berries, and on the palate, there’s a combination of strawberry tart and darker red berries.

Cadelvento Venturini Baldini Venturini Baldini Venturini Baldini– Cadelvento (Lambrusco Spumante DOP)–Tasting Notes Smells–”Light strawberry and raspberry aromas.” Venturini Baldini– Cadelvento (Lambrusco Spumante DOP)–Tasting Notes “Red berries with a hint of minerals / pink grapefruit,” according to the flavors.

Venturini Baldini is a family of Italian architects.

Venturini Baldini– Rubino del Cerro (Lambrusco Spumante DOP)– Venturini Baldini– Rubino del Cerro (Lambrusco Spumante DOP) Notes on the Tasting Scents are described as “soft blackcurrant aromas.” Flavors – “Sharp red berries and blackcurrant flavors,” according to the manufacturer.

During the World’s Finest Glass of Bubbly Awards 2019, thisLambrusco was awarded aSilver Medal in theSummer DaysCategory.

Lambrusco Wine: Discover A Surprisingly Versatile Red Wine

Lambrusco wine is one of the most widely accessible varieties of a single type of wine, and it is produced in vast quantities. With Lambrusco, there is something for everyone; it is only a matter of selecting the ideal version for you. Join us as we explore the world of Lambrusco wine and learn everything there is to know. You’ll soon gain confidence in your ability to select the most appropriate variety for you.

What Is Lambrusco Wine?

Specifically, lambrusco wine is a sort of wine created from the grape variety known as Lambbrusco. It might be difficult to choose from the Lambrusco variety because there are over 60 different varieties of grapes in the variety. In contrast to other wines that adhere to a single overarching style, such as a Merlot, which will almost always be a dry wine, Lambrusco adopts a more eclectic approach. Lambrusco is available in three different flavors: dry, semi-sweet, and sweet. It is also available in both sparkling and non-sparkling types.

Where Is Lambrusco Wine From?

Lambrusco grapes are indigenous to the Emilia Romagna region of Italy, and it is one of the few grape kinds that has just recently begun to spread beyond the borders of the country’s borders. Lambrusco grapes are now planted in a number of vineyards throughout Italy, with the majority of them being in the Emilia Romagna and Lombardy regions. There are a few smaller vineyards in Australia and Argentina, but due to the lack of size, it is doubtful that you will be able to purchase an Australian or Argentinian bottle of Lambrusco at your local wine retailer.

How Is Lambrusco Wine Made?

Lambrusco is frequently sold as a sparkling wine, and as such, it is produced in a manner that is similar to that of traditional sparkling wine manufacturing. The grapes are crushed and allowed to go through the initial stage of fermentation while remaining in touch with the pulp and skins, which gives the wine its distinctive crimson color. After the fermentation process is complete, the wine is pressed to extract all of the juices from the leftover solids and pulp and discard the remainder.

To prevent the wine from entering immediately into the ageing process, it is subjected to a second fermentation.

Given how well the vessel is shut, the pressure will not allow the CO2 to escape, resulting in a sparkling wine that is effervescent and light.

It has been around for centuries.

What Does Lambrusco Wine Taste Like?

Wine made from lambrusco grapes is a blend of grapes grown in a variety of different regions, and as a result, the flavors of the wines can be drastically different.

Generally speaking, though, you may anticipate to notice a predominant fruity flavor, with hints of blackcurrant, strawberry, and cherry flavors as well as floral notes and even fruit flavors in the background.

Is Lambrusco A Sweet Wine?

Lambrusco wine can be the greatest sweet red wine, but not all of it is sweet, which makes it difficult to compare. Lambrusco is one of the few types of wine that may be made sweet, semi-sweet, or dry depending on the varietal. It’s important to choose your favorite Lambrusco while you’re shopping because the variety of wines in the Lambrusco category is extensive. It is important to note that the best of the Lambrusco wine selection is often dry to semi-sweet in flavor, although there are excellent sweet variants of this wine available as well as dry.

What Is The Alcohol Content Of Lambrusco?

It is widely agreed that lambrusco red wine has a low to medium alcohol concentration, averaging between 10 and 12 percentage points by volume (by volume). This is not always the case, since some Lambrusco red wine has an alcohol concentration of up to 13 percent, making it an exception. Lambrusco with a higher alcohol concentration, on the other hand, is not frequent, and it is generally recommended to keep the alcohol percentage between 10 and 12 percent.

How To Drink Lambrusco Wine

Generally speaking, the alcohol content of lambrusco red wine is on the low to medium side, averaging between 10 percent and 12 percent. This is not always the case, since some Lambrusco red wine has an alcohol concentration of up to 13 percent, which is considered excessive. Lambrusco with a higher alcohol concentration, on the other hand, is uncommon, and it is generally recommended to keep the alcohol percentage between 10 and 12 percent.

What Food Does Lambrusco Wine Pair With?

Lambrusco is known for favoring rich, unctuous, and even greasy items in its cuisine. This is the wine to pair with a special occasion dinner. Lambrusco, both dry and semi-sweet, will mix nicely with any type of meat, but they are at their finest when served alongside cured meats and creamy cheeses. With Lambrusco, a charcuterie board with Italian meats such as prosciutto and salami, as well as some excellent soft cheeses, will be the perfect pairing! Desserts that are rich and fruit-forward, such as apple or cherry pie, will be an excellent complement to the sweet variation.

Is Lambrusco Wine Healthy?

When it comes to the healthfulness of Lambrusco red wine, it will primarily rely on the kind you choose to consume. However, while all red wine includes a high concentration of antioxidants, the amount of sugar in your Lambrusco will vary depending on the style you choose. A sweet Lambrusco wine will always have more sugar than a dry Lambrusco wine, regardless of the kind of wine.

What Wine Is Similar To Lambrusco?

The healthfulness of Lambrusco red wine will be determined in great part by the kind you choose to consume. All red wines have high quantities of antioxidants; nevertheless, the amount of sugar in your chosen Lambrusco will vary depending on its style. When comparing sweet and dry Lambrusco wines, a sweet wine will always have more sugar than a dry one.

  • A fantastic dry to semi-sweet wine, Blanc de Noirs is a great alternative to some of the top Lambrusco wines. Blanc de noirs is a dry sparkling red wine made from the grapes Pinot Noir or Pinot Meunier, and it is among the most costly wines on the market. Semi-sweet– The blanc de noirs grape variety is also excellent for producing semi-sweet wines, with some very outstanding examples being produced. Sweet– Brachetto d’Acqui is a sweet wine that is comparable to the Lambrusco sweets that are available. Brachetto d’acqui, a wonderful sparkling sweet red wine created only from the Brachetto grape type, is a very light, sweet, and fruit-forward sparkling wine
  • It is produced in small quantities.

Pick up a bottle of Lambrusco the next time you’re in the market for something a little unusual.

Lambrusco di Modena DOC

Cookies are used on our website to provide you with the best relevant experience possible by storing your choices and recognizing you when you return. By selecting “Accept All,” you agree to the usage of ALL cookies on this website. You may, however, select “Reject All” to prevent cookies from being accepted. When was the last time you ate supper in an Italian restaurant in Canada and felt as if you were dining in a European country? The goal of “Ospitalità Italiana Certified” restaurants is to provide a welcoming atmosphere for guests who dine in their fine dining facilities.

Canada is home to some of the world’s most renowned Italian chefs.

In addition, Montréal is home to a fantastic cooking school, ITHQ, where young aspiring chefs learn from the masters about Italian technique and traditional recipes from the country’s cuisine.

So the next time you book a reservation for an Italian meal at a Montreal restaurant, inquire as to whether or not the establishment has been awarded the Ospitalità Italiana label. You will appreciate the authentic Italian flavor.

Lambrusco Wine Ratings & Reviews

Reviews that are related1-20 of 207

Paltrinieri 2020 Leclisse(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2020 Leclisse(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region This delightful, softly sparkling wine has subtle aromas of berries and is radiant and bone-dry. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 95Points $25

Paltrinieri 2020 Radice(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2020 Radice(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Aromas of woodland berries, violets, and botanical herbs are prominent in this blend on the nose. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 95Points $20

Paltrinieri 2019 La Riserva Extra Brut(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2019 La Riserva Extra Brut(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region The smells of blue flower, wild strawberry, and botanical herbs are prominent in this blend. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 94Points$30

Cleto Chiarli 2020 Lambrusco del Fondatore(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Cleto Chiarli 2020 Lambrusco del Fondatore(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region The fragrances of Morello cherry and violet take center stage in this savory sparkler. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 93Points $20

Paltrinieri 2018 Grosso Metodo Classico(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2018 Grosso Metodo Classico(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s heartland

Cantina della Volta 2016 Metodo Classico Brut Rosé(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s Central Region

Cantina della Volta 2016 Metodo Classico Brut Rosé(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region The nose is tempting, with notes of red cherry, violet, and a hint of brioche. See the Complete Review 92Points$38

Medici Ermete 2020 Phermento Vino Frizante Secco Rifermentato in Bottiglia(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Medici Ermete 2020 Phermento Vino Frizante Secco Rifermentato in Bottiglia(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region The fragrance of red berry and wild plant wafts out of the enclosure. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 92Points$27

Lusvardi 2018 Dosaggio Zero Rosato Lambrusco Salamino (Vino Spumante)

Italy and other countries

Lusvardi 2018 Dosaggio Zero Rosato Lambrusco Salamino (Vino Spumante)

Italy and other countries This bone-dry, savory sparkler, made from organically cultivated grapes, opens with an appealing, fruity aroma. See the Complete Review 92Points$35

Fiorini 2020 Corte degli Attimi(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Fiorini 2020 Corte degli Attimi(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region This light-hued, polished sparkler, made from organically cultivated grapes, opens with a tinge of sweetness. Buy with confidence from Best Buy. See the Complete Review 91Points $15

Medici Ermete 2018 Metodo Classico Brut Granconcerto Lambrusco Salamino (Vino Spumante)

Italy’s heartland This light-hued, polished sparkler, made from organically cultivated grapes, opens with a tinge of citrus. Buy with confidence. See the Entire Evaluation 91Points $15

Medici Ermete 2018 Metodo Classico Brut Granconcerto Lambrusco Salamino (Vino Spumante)

The scents of blackberry, blueberry, and wild cherry abound in this deep-colored wine from Italy. The. See the Complete Review89Points$30

Medici Ermete NV Carezza Metodo Classico(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Medici Ermete NV Carezza Metodo Classico(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Aromas of violet, wild grass, moist soil, and forest berries dominate the bouquet. See the Complete Review 89Points$28

Fiorini 2019 Vignadelpadre(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Fiorini 2019 Vignadelpadre(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Aromas of crushed black olive, sun-baked soil, and wild strawberry linger on the palate after the first sip. See the Complete Review 88Points$20

Cantina di Soliera NVLambrusco di Sorbara

Italy’s central region

Cantina di Soliera NVLambrusco di Sorbara

Italy’s central region The fragrances of red berries and blue flowers permeate this basic sparkler. The fact that it’s dry. See the Complete Review 88PointsN/A

Settecani NVLambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro

Italy’s central region

Settecani NVLambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro

Italy’s central region Aromas of ripe blackberry and violet, as well as a faint scent of charred wood. See the Complete Review 87PointsN/A

Villa di Corlo NV Metodo Classico Elettra Brut Rosé(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Villa di Corlo NV Metodo Classico Elettra Brut Rosé(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Aromas of freshly squeezed grape juice, white rose petals, and orange peel fill the nostrils. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 92Points$22

Villa di Corlo 2019 Corleto(Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro)

Italy’s central region

Villa di Corlo 2019 Corleto(Lambrusco Grasparossa di Castelvetro)

Italy’s central region This beer is deep in color, dry, and softly effervescent, with notes of blue flower in the background. See the Complete Review 89Points$20

Cantina Settecani di Castelvetro NV Vini del Re(Lambrusco di Modena)

Italy’s central region

Cantina Settecani di Castelvetro NV Vini del Re(Lambrusco di Modena)

Italy’s central region Aromas of freshly squeezed grapes, with a hint of violet develop in the background. See the Complete Review 86Points$14

Paltrinieri 2019 Radice(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2019 Radice(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Produced by completing the second fermentation in the bottle, this brilliant wine is made. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review95Points $20

Paltrinieri 2019 Leclisse(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region

Paltrinieri 2019 Leclisse(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region This exquisite, aromatic wine, which is really wonderful, with tempting notes of violet and red fruit. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 95Points$25

Medici Ermete 2018 Metodo Classico Carezza(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s heartland Elegant and aromatic, this wine has tempting aromas of violet and red fruit that are really excellent. Picked by the editor See the Entire Evaluation 95Points$25

Medici Ermete 2018 Metodo Classico Carezza(Lambrusco di Sorbara)

Italy’s central region Strawberries, rose petals, and a scent of brioche are the first to greet you as you enter. Picked by the editors See the Complete Review 92Points$28

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