What Does Dandelion Wine Taste Like? (Solved)

Generally, dandelion wine tastes warm and earthy. Sometimes compared to white wine.

  • So, what does dandelion wine taste like? It’s surprisingly sweet! According to the woman who made this wine, she categorizes it as a dessert wine verses a table wine. It’s sweeter than a riesling, but not as syrupy as some dessert wines. You get floral notes as well as citrusy notes.

Contents

What is the taste of dandelion wine?

So, what does dandelion wine taste like? It’s surprisingly sweet! According to the woman who made this wine, she categorizes it as a dessert wine verses a table wine. It’s sweeter than a riesling, but not as syrupy as some dessert wines.

What does dandelion wine smell like?

The Dandelion wine smells good, musty,(yeasty), “winey”,and the alcohol content is evident in the aroma. After you have done a few rounds of wildflower wines you will get to know what they should smell like at each stage and be able to tell by the smell whether all is well or not.

What are the benefits of dandelion wine?

Benefits of Dandelion Wine

  • It’s a good source of vitamins A, B, and C and potassium.
  • It contains antioxidants.
  • Dandelions are considered a digestive tonic, so you can use the wine as a digestif after meals.
  • Dandelions may also help reduce inflammation.

Can you buy dandelion wine?

Dandelion wine is only available either at our retail store in Amish Country or online! How many dandelion blossoms does it take to make 1000 gallons of wine? Just ask the Amish family who pick them for us on two sunny days in the spring.

What happens in dandelion wine?

Dandelion Wine is a meditation on mortality, memory, nostalgia, and childhood that starts on the first day of summer and ends on the last. It’s a reminder of just how much living you can pack into three months if you really try—and if you have the right shoes.

What is dandelion wine made from?

Dandelions are the bane of many a homeowner’s existence, but they can be transformed into the most delicious sunshine-filled liqueur (colloquially called wine) by making a dandelion tea and then letting it ferment with sugar and citrus.

Does dandelion wine have alcohol?

One question many people have is whether dandelion wine contains alcohol. As far as alcohol content goes, it really depends on how much sugar goes in and what kind of yeast you use. But generally, a good estimate for dandelion wine’s ABV ranges anywhere from 12% to 15%.

Does dandelion wine go bad?

“ It does improve with bottle time,” says Ken. “Ours are generally two to three years old, and I find the smell of a meadow of dandelions intensifies, and in that time any green notes go away.”

What genre is dandelion wine?

Dandelion greens can be eaten cooked or raw and are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K. They also contain vitamin E, folate, and small amounts of other B vitamins ( 1 ). What’s more, dandelion greens provide a substantial amount of several minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium, and potassium ( 1 ).

What is the most nutritious part of the dandelion?

The health benefits of fiber are also well known. The root of the dandelion is rich in fiber and may help to support the balance of bacteria in your digestive system. Dandelions are an easy-to-grow food source.

Can u eat dandelions flowers?

The dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is an abundant “weed” plant that also happens to be edible. Dandelion flowers are a great addition to pancakes or fritters. Just add one-half to three-quarter cup of plucked flowers to your regular pancake or fritter mix. Flowers can be plucked fresh, or dried and then plucked.

Can homemade wine be poisonous?

The short answer is no, wine cannot become poisonous. If a person has been sickened by wine, it would only be due to adulteration—something added to the wine, not intrinsically a part of it. On its own, wine can be unpleasant to drink, but it will never make you sick (as long as if you don’t drink too much).

Who dies in dandelion wine?

Chapter 31. The next day, Douglas, Tom, and Charlie discuss the events of the night before. Lavinia Nebbs stabbed and killed the Lonely One with a pair of sewing scissors. Douglas is shocked at how close he was to all of the death.

What does date wine taste like?

Dates wine/ Date wine is well-balanced with fresh fruity flavours and mild sweetness to give you refreshing as well as exotic feel.

What Does Dandelion Wine Taste Like?

Disclosure: As Amazon Associates, we receive a commission on qualifying orders made via our links. When you make a purchase after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may get a commission at no additional cost to you. Have you ever heard of the beverage known as dandelion wine? Dandelion wine is covered in detail in this page, including its flavor, queries regarding its alcohol content, cooking tips and tactics, and more. Let’s get this party started. Use the links provided below to navigate through this article.

What Does Dandelion Wine Taste Like?

Dandelion wine does not have a flavor that is similar to grape wine. Dandelion wine, which is typically sweetened with sugar, is sweet, flowery, and a touch bitter in a pleasant manner, similar to green tea. If you’re purchasing dandelion wine, it’s crucial to look at the label to see what sort of sweetness has been used. Sugar is the most commonly used sweetener, however honey, which is not vegan, is also frequently used.

Does Dandelion Wine Taste Good?

Not everyone like wine, regardless of whether it is made from dandelion, grape, or cherry juice. However, if you enjoy wine, you will find that dandelion wine is a delightful addition to your collection because the flavor is really nice. Dandelion wine has a refreshing and summery flavor, which is to be expected from a wine created from June blooms. Dandelion wine is a sweet wine that is likely to appeal to those who enjoy sweet wines. Arugula and Dandelion: Is There a Relationship Between the Two?

Does Dandelion Wine Have Alcohol?

Dandelion wine contains alcohol, just as any other type of wine. The amount of alcohol in dandelion wines varies from bottle to bottle, although the majority of dandelion wines are moderate in strength. Dandelion wine should be treated as any other wine or alcoholic beverage, especially if you don’t have access to the precise proof of the beverage. In a related article, find out what cucumber water tastes like.

Can You Freeze Dandelions for Wine?

Dandelions can absolutely be frozen and used to make wine. If you haven’t quite picked enough dandelions to use in a dish or if you have too many to use all at once, freezing them for later use is a good option. For best results, lay dandelions out individually on a baking sheet and freeze them for one hour in batches rather as one large hard, frozen lump. After that, you may combine them in a single container and store them in the freezer until you’re ready to use them. Also, check out this article on what Dill Weed tastes like.

Dandelion Wine Making Tips

Dandelions may absolutely be frozen and used to make wine! If you haven’t picked enough dandelions to use in a dish or if you have too many to use all at once, freezing them for later use is a good option. In order to avoid a large hard frozen lump later on, spread your dandelions out separately and freeze them for one hour at a time in batches. Then you may combine them in a single container and store them in the freezer until you’re ready to use them. What Does Dill Weed Taste Like? Also read this:

Wrap Up

Dandelion wine is a delightful type of wine that is very different from the grape wine that most of us are accustomed to drinking. It has a floral and sweet flavor with a lovely hint of bitterness.

You can brew your own dandelion wine at home in minutes, and you can customize it by adding any extra fruits and spices of your choice to create your own unique combination. What Does Duck Sauce Taste Like? Related Article: What Does Duck Sauce Taste Like?

How to Make Dandelion Wine (And How it Tastes)

courtesy of YouTube If there is one consistency in human history, it is that if we have the ability to manufacture alcohol, we will make alcohol. Even if there isn’t much to work with in terms of materials. Creating your own home-brewed beers and wines has seen a significant increase in popularity in recent years. Some interesting taste combinations and combinations of ingredients have emerged as a result of the DIY alcohol movement, as well as some problematic ones. Which of the following categories would dandelion wine fit into?

  1. courtesy of YouTube First and foremost, we must discuss the most vital ingredient: dandelions.
  2. Even though this appears to be a no-brainer, it is worth mentioning nonetheless.
  3. Like, far more than you anticipate.
  4. Following that, bring some sugar water to a boil until all of the sugar has been dissolved.
  5. Finally, dissolve a package of wine yeast in a little amount of warm water and let it to sit for a few minutes to allow it to become active.
  6. Start by putting the dandelions in a big container and adding the lemon zest, sugar water, and, to your surprise, only a few raisins on top.
  7. You should leave a few inches of room on top of the jar, and you shouldn’t tighten the lid completely.

Refrigerate or freeze the container for about 3 weeks before using.

Seal the bottles and allow them to sit for at least 6 weeks, but the longer you can allow them to sit the better.

The more time you give it, the sweeter it becomes and the punch is dialed back.

It’s surprisingly delicious!

However, it is not as syrupy as other dessert wines and is sweeter than a riesling.

It’s difficult to determine the precise alcohol percentage without special equipment, but this particular batch is claimed to have been very potent in terms of alcohol content.

Watch the whole process and get the recipe in the video below!

This post may include affiliate links, which will not affect your purchase price but will allow the author to earn a profit. Is it possible to make wine from dandelions? Yes, without a doubt! Making handmade dandelion wine is a long-standing family ritual that dates back generations. We don’t make it every year, but I like to have a few bottles on hand just in case someone comes around. A excellent brandy rather than a wine, this dandelion wine has a rich, golden flavor that is both warming and comforting.

Dandelions are plentiful in our garden, and when we get them, we get A LOT OF THEM!

(The images of the boys are from 2010.) They have grown a great deal since then, but I have retained these images for the joy they bring me.) Pesticides, herbicides, and other pollutants should not be present in your dandelion flower arrangements.

If you want to drink wine, don’t pluck dandelions or eat from a spot where dogs go to “go to the potty.” Moreover, as I stated to a reader in the comments section, I am very certain that goat pee cannot be removed.

Don’t Make this Dandelion Wine Mistake!

Only the yellow flower petals should be used to make dandelion wine. The wine produced by leaving the petals connected to the green root of the flower will be harsh and unpleasant. When my neighbor attempted to create dandelion wine, she made the same error, and she ended up tossing out the entire pot of wine. 3 quarts of loosely packed yellow dandelion petals are used in this recipe. Not three quarts of flower heads, but three quarts of petals exclusively. In the event that you don’t have enough dandelion petals from a single plucking, you can freeze the petals until you do have enough.

Never ferment in aluminum or iron, since these metals might react with the wine and cause it to spoil.

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You want to remove the petals as soon as possible after selecting the flowers since the flower heads will shut over time if you leave them on.

In the event that you are working alone, it may be helpful to select some of the flowers you will need, remove the petals, then select other flowers and continue the process.

Homemade Dandelion Wine Recipe

” Dandelion wine, which is said to be of Celtic origin, is recognized as one of Europe’s finest country wines and is produced in small quantities. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was considered impolite for females to consume alcoholic beverages. “Dandelion flower wine, on the other hand, was regarded to be so beneficial to the kidneys and digestive system that it was considered medicinal even for the ladies.” Dandelion Medicine was used in conjunction with my mother’s recipe to create this dish.

  • 1 gallon of water
  • 3 quarts of dandelion petals 1 lemon, with peel, ideally organic
  • 2 oranges, with peel, preferably organic
  • 1 lime, with peel, preferably organic
  • Three pounds of sugar 1-pound raisins, ideally organic (buy organic raisins)
  • 1 packet wine yeast or champagne yeast
  • 1 package sugar

How to make dandelion wine – Directions

When the flowers are fully open on a bright day, collect them as soon as possible. Remove any green pieces that may have remained. 2) Bring the water to a boil in a big saucepan or crockpot and pour it over the flowers to cover them. Allow for three days of steeping, covered with a towel to discourage dust from getting in. Every day, give it a good stir to keep the petals buried. They will develop a musty odor as a result of this. This is quite normal. 3. Prepare the oranges and lemon for serving.

  1. You want to keep the quantity of white pith added to the brew to a bare minimum.
  2. In a small saucepan, bring the flower-water combination to a boil, adding the lemon and orange zest as needed.
  3. In a small bowl, dissolve the sugar in the floral water.
  4. 5) Stir in the yeast, orange and lemon slices, and raisins to the liquid mixture until well combined.

To ferment, combine everything in a crock (or wide mouth carboy with an airlock) and set aside. To keep dust and pests out of my crock, I cover it with a clean cotton towel that is secured with a rubber band. Stir using a wooden spoon or a non-reactive stir stick on a regular basis.

Bottling the Wine

When it comes to bottling your own dandelion wine, you have two alternatives. You have the option of letting it complete in bottles or moving it to a carboy and then bottling. To end in bottles, we’ll say: It is approximately time for fermentation to be completed when the primary fermentation mixture stops bubbling (1 – 2 weeks). Using cheesecloth or a flour sack towel, strain the liquid through several layers of cheesecloth and into sterilized containers. Place a deflated balloon over the top of each bottle to keep track of whether or not there is any more fermentation.

  • Refrigerate for at least six months after corking the bottles and storing them in a cold, dark location before consuming.
  • Otherwise, you’ll wind up with bottles that explode, as my sister Mary did when she tried to store them in a corner of a closet.
  • If you want a clearer wine, rack the wine into an agallon carboy with an airlock before bottling it up at the end.
  • If you’d like to get a pdf copy of my dandelion wine labels, just click on the following link: dandelion wine labels.

Recommended materials for Making Dandelion Wine

  • Yeast for making wine
  • 2 Gallon Crock– 2 gallons provides you with enough area for fermentation to take place. Bottles of wine – It is OK to wash and reuse old wine bottles. Corks
  • Wine Bottle Corker– This double-lever type works like a charm and is really durable. A gallon carboy with an airlock is optional, although it will result in cleaner wine.

Print Friendly Recipe

From head to toe, this rich and hearty floral wine, with citrus undertones, will warm you from the inside out.

  • A smooth and hearty floral wine with citrus overtones that will warm you from head to toe and leave you feeling refreshed and renewed.
  1. On a sunny day, wait until the blooms are fully open before collecting them. Remove any green sections that are present
  2. Bring the water to a boil in a big saucepan or crock pot and pour it over the flowers to cook. Allow for three days of steeping, covered with a towel to discourage dust from getting in. Daily maintenance is required to keep the petals buried. Prepare the oranges and lemons according per package directions. Peel away approximately half of the rind using a fine-mesh grater, then peel away the remaining rind in extremely thin strips. You want to keep the quantity of white pith added to the brew to a bare minimum. Finalize the peeling of the citrus fruits and thinly slice them into rounds
  3. Then, bring the flower-water mixture back to a boil, adding the lemon and orange zest as needed. Remove from the heat, sift off the solids, and then whisk in the sugar until it is completely dissolved. Allow the liquid to cool to room temperature before adding the yeast, orange and lemon slices, and raisins to the mixture. To ferment, combine everything in a crock (or wide mouth carboy with an airlock) and set aside. Clean cotton towels secured with rubber bands are placed over the top of my crock pot. Stir using a wooden spoon or a non-reactive stir stick on a regular basis.

Bottling the Wine

When it comes to bottling your own dandelion wine, you have two alternatives. You have the option of letting it complete in bottles or moving it to a carboy and then bottling. To end in bottles, we’ll say: It is approximately time for fermentation to be completed when the primary fermentation mixture stops bubbling (1 – 2 weeks). Transfer the liquid to sterilized bottles after straining it through several layers of cheesecloth or a flour sack towel. Place a deflated balloon over the top of each bottle to keep track of whether or not there is any more fermentation.

Refrigerate for at least six months after corking the bottles and storing them in a cold, dark location before consuming.

Allow the fermentation to continue in the carboy for 2-3 months before racking into the bottles.

Notes

Bottles should not be sealed securely until they have finished fermenting, and they should not be stored anywhere heated.

Otherwise, you’ll wind up with bottles that explode, as my sister Mary did when she tried to store them in a corner of a closet. According to reports, it sounded like bombs were being detonated or that they were being fired at from behind.

Is Dandelion Wine Alcoholic?

Yes. If you follow the recipe’s instructions and utilize wine yeast, you should end up with a final alcohol content of roughly 12 to 13 percent. If you’re feeling very daring, you might be able to coax natural yeast from the raisins into fermenting with you. Wild yeast beers will have a lower alcohol content than conventional brews because wild yeast dies when the alcohol levels in the beer become too high. If you’re interested in learning more about employing wild yeasts, check out the book ” The Wildcrafting Brewer ” or take the Art of Herbal Fermentation online program offered by The Herbal Academy.

  • Dandelion Roots: How to Harvest and Use Them
  • Dandelion Jelly Recipe with Low Sugar Content
  • Dandelion Plus has a number of advantages. Tips for Using Greens, Seeds, Roots, and Flowers
  • Put an end to the Dandelion Madness

The original version of this article was published in 2010, and the most recent update was released in 2020.

Homemade Dandelion Wine Recipe

Danielle wine captures the essence of summer in a single sip. Dandelion wine is delicious enough to bring out the forager in anybody, thanks to its sweetness, floral aromas, and faint honey overtones. It takes a lot of dandelions to make wine, so it’s best to enlist the assistance of as many small children as possible to complete the process. The author of Backyard Medicine tells the story of how her very first job as a child was collecting dandelions for her neighbor’s dandelion wine, which she enjoyed immensely.

  1. We used a 4-year-old neighbor girl to assist us in making dandelion mead, which is a type of dandelion honey wine, the first time we made it.
  2. Dandelion bouquets were brought to me by my grandmother every time I saw her for the remainder of the summer after that.
  3. In order to make dandelion wine, the most difficult part is not collecting the dandelions.
  4. The green leaves contain a milky sap that will detract from the flavor of the dandelion wine, so only the petals should be used in a good batch.
  5. It’s nice job for a hot afternoon, plus I got to work with my favorite female.
  6. Because cleaning dandelion flowers for wine is time-consuming, plan on making only a small amount of the beverage at a time.
  7. Originally, I had intended to make a super-tiny1-quart batch in a quart mason jar as a test run.

In the end, we made more progress than I had anticipated and ended up with enough petals to make a full one-gallon batch of dandelion wine from start to finish.

Those of you who have struggled to clean out a narrow neck carboy after brewing with flower petals or any other small particulate will understand why the wide mouth is so beneficial.

The dandelion petals must be filtered out of the wine before it is racked into a new secondary fermentation vessel after the primary fermentation is complete.

Racking is a winemaking term that simply refers to the process of transferring wine from one clean container to another while leaving the sediment at the bottom of the container behind.

It’s best if you have two fermentation vessels so that there’s always a clean one ready, but if you don’t have two fermentation vessels, pouring the dandelion wine into a pair of half-gallon mason jars while you wash out the fermenter will suffice.

Dandelions are used to make this wine, which means that the sugar syrup is added cold, allowing for more of the floral flavor of the dandelions to be preserved in the final product.

Tea is still much cleaner than fermenting with flower petals in the fermenter, and there is no risk of the flower petals bubbling up and clogging the airlock if you make tea instead of fermenting with flower petals in the fermenter.

If you don’t have access to a siphon or other brewing equipment, you can simply brew this dandelion wine in a pair of half-gallon mason jars with inexpensive silicone water locks to save money on brewing supplies.

Reattach a water lock, and you’ll be good to go until bottling time comes around again.

If you want to make dandelion wine, you can also add 1 teaspoon of yeast nutrient to it, which will offer nutrients to the yeast without altering the flavor of the completed product. That is, without a doubt, the most effective way for producing the highest grade dandelion wine.

How Does Dandelion Wine Taste?

Dandelions are used to make a sweet, mellow wine that is flowery in flavor if it is made properly. You can practically feel the warmth of the sun brushing across your lips, and it goes down smoothly with no traces of bitterness at all. We tasted this batch in January, after it had been in the bottle for around 6 months, and it was perfect. More significantly, it was just what I needed on a chilly Vermont evening, with more snow in the forecast and many feet of snow already on the ground. It was perfect.

A sweet flowery wine that captures the spirit of summer in a bottle, this one is a must-try.

Ingredients

  • 3 quarts water (approximate, more to fill)
  • 3 pounds sugar (about 5 to 6 cups)
  • 1 quart dandelion petals (packed from approximately 3-4 quarts blossoms)
  • The following ingredients: 3 oranges juice and zest
  • 1 lemon juice and zest
  • 1 teaspoon yeast nutrition
  • 1 packet wine yeast

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan, bring the water and sugar to a rolling boil. Stir until the sugar is completely dissolved, then set aside to cool to lukewarm. Fill a one-gallon fermentation jar halfway with dandelion flowers and top with citrus juice and zest. Pour the lukewarm sugar water over the top of the yeast nutrition and mix thoroughly. In a little amount of lukewarm water, dissolve a package of champagne yeast or other wine yeast. Allow it to sit for 5 minutes to rehydrate before pouring it into the wine glass. Allow at least an inch of headspace in the carboy before topping it out with a little amount of extra water to bring it up to filling capacity. Cap the container with an airlock and allow it to ferment for approximately 3 weeks, or until fermentation has halted. The process will take a little longer if you don’t use raisins since they provide additional micronutrients that help the yeast to function more quickly. Fill a clean container halfway with the wine and strain off all of the yeast sediment. Allow the wine to ferment in secondary for at least 6 to 8 weeks, checking the water lock on a regular basis to verify that the water hasn’t evaporated during the process. Dandelion wine should be transferred to a clean container, leaving the sediment behind once more, in order to prepare for bottling. Corked wine bottles are best for long-term preservation, while flip top Grolsch bottles are OK for small amounts that will not be kept for long. Allow the wine to mature in the bottle for at least 2 months before drinking it
  2. Preferably, 6 months or more is preferable to 2 months. Note: During the age process, the wine should be stored in a cool environment, such as a cellar or closet on the north side of the house.
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If you want to produce dandelion wine without spending a lot of time on it, cut the recipe in half to make a 1-quart batch that will last you a long time. It’s a fantastic alternative for people who want to give it a try but don’t want to spend all day picking petals apart. All you need is a quart mason jar and a fermentation kit for mason jars to get started. In a quart quantity of champagne, a complete package of champagne yeast will be excessive, so only use around 1/4 of a packet of champagne yeast.

More Dandelion Recipes

  • To produce dandelion wine without devoting a lot of time to it, cut the recipe in half to yield a 1-quart batch that can be consumed in one sitting. If you’re interested in trying it out but don’t want to spend all day picking petals apart, this is a fantastic option for you. All you need is a quart mason jar and a fermentation kit for mason jars to make this recipe. In a quart quantity of champagne, a whole packet of champagne yeast will be overkill, so only use around 1/4 of a packet. The remainder should be saved for future small batch brew, or it might be used to make small batch mead.

Interesting tidbits. Dandelion Wine is included in a Ray Bradbury novel of the same name, in which the drink is used as a metaphor for condensing all of the pleasures of summer into a single bottle. How about this for a dose of nostalgia. “For a growing youngster, the summer of ’28 was a very memorable season. Summertime means green apple trees, freshly mowed lawns, and brand new sneakers. Half-burned firecrackers, picking dandelions, and Grandma’s belly-busting meal are all things that come to mind.

Summer in the life of a twelve-year-old boy is a magnificent and eternal experience.”

Easy Dandelion Wine Recipes and Tips

Making dandelion wine is a fantastic way to make use of the weeds that appear in your yard on a regular basis. Danielle wine is a fragrant, gently flowery off-dry to sweet wine with notes of sunlight and summers in its bouquet and flavor. It’s also an excellent first-time winemaking endeavor. In order to brew a one-gallon quantity of wine, you’ll need standard winemaking supplies.

Ingredients

  • 4 quarts dandelion flowers, petals alone, green portions removed
  • 1 gallon plus 14 cup water, divided
  • 6 cups sugar
  • 1 package wine yeast (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon yeast nutrition
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 lemon with its juice and zest
  • 2 oranges with their juice and zest
  • Chop up 2 cups golden raisins (optional).

Instructions

  1. Bring one gallon of water and the sugar to a boil in a big saucepan, stirring constantly, until the sugar is completely dissolved. Allow to cool to room temperature (do not chill) after removing from the heat. Using a small measuring cup, combine the yeast with 14 cup warm water (105°F to 110°F) and let the mixture to boil. Allow it to rest for five minutes
  2. Put everything in a one-gallon carboy, including the dandelion flowers, yeast nutrient, lemon juice and zest, orange juice and zest, and raisins, and pour the cooled sugar water over the top
  3. Let it sit overnight. Pour the yeast mixture into the bowl. Gently combine
  4. Fill the carboy to the brim with water and secure it with an airlock. Allow for fermentation to take place in a warm location (about 70°F) for two to three weeks, or until fermentation has come to an end (you’ll notice that the bubbles in the airlock have stopped and the wine is clarified because sediment has settled to the bottom of the carboy)
  5. Fill a clean container halfway with water and siphon through a filter, eliminating any solids such as raisins, orange and lemon peels, and dandelion flowers. An airlock should be used to secure the container. fermentation for another two to three weeks, or until the bubbles have subsided. To remove any remaining sediment, pass the solution through a third time through the filter into a clean container. Bottle into sterilized corked or sealed bottles that have been cleaned. Allow for aging for 2 to 6 months in a cool, dry environment

Sweet Dandelion Wine Recipe

The wine produced by the following recipe is gently sweet and fragrant. Simply increase the amount of sugar used in the basic recipe (up to 8 cups) if you like a sweeter dandelion wine home brew flavor. You may also back sweeten wine by adding a sugar solution including potassium sorbate and Campden tablets, which will stabilize the wine and prevent it from fermenting further. This should only be done when the fermenting process is complete.

Ingredients

  • The recipe for dandelion wine is provided above. 1 to 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 to 3 cups of water
  • 1 to 3 campden tablets (in the quantity specified for 1 gallon of liquid in the packaging instructions)
  • 1 to 3 cups of potassium sorbate (in the amount specified for 1 gallon of liquid in the package instructions)

Instructions

  1. Complete the recipe according to the instructions above until step 8
  2. In a 14-cup measuring cup of boiling water, dissolve the potassium sorbate and Campden tablets. Cool
  3. Gently stir in the cooled liquid until the wine is well-mixed. Allow for 12 hours of resting time at room temperature. Sugar syrup is made by combining equal parts sugar and water in a saucepan and boiling it until the sugar dissolves. Sugar syrup should be added in little amounts at a time (about 1 tablespoon at a time), stirring constantly and tasting as you go, until the appropriate sweetness is reached. Fill the bottle with water and seal it. Two to six months in a cool, dry environment is recommended for aging the bottle.

Dry Dandelion Wine Variation

You may also produce a dry dandelion wine from the above recipe by lowering the amount of sugar you use in the beginning and removing the golden raisins.

To produce a dry wine, use just two cups of sugar and delete the raisins from the recipe, which is otherwise the same as before. Do not add sugar solution to the wine after it has been poured.

Tips for Making and Serving Dandelion Wine

When preparing dandelion wine, keep the following suggestions in mind:

  • Make sure to start with sanitized equipment
  • Only use the petals of flowers for the wine. Any green components should be avoided as they will impart astringent tastes. To add astringency to your wine, you can leave a few green bits in it, but not many (less than a teaspoon worth of green pieces)
  • When siphoning your wine from one container to another (a process known as racking), filter the liquid through a very fine filter to eliminate any microparticles from the wine before bottling. As a filter, you can use many layers of cheesecloth
  • However, this is not recommended. Chill the wine and serve it cold, just like you would any other white or dessert wine
  • Keep the wine for up to two years in a cool, dark place, just like any other bottle of wine.

Is Dandelion Wine Alcoholic?

Many people wonder if dandelion wine contains any alcohol, and this is a valid issue. Dandelion wine, like other yeast-sugar fermented drinks, does include a small amount of alcoholic content. However, the amount of alcohol varies depending on how much sugar was fermented; in average, it’s between 12 and 15 percent alcohol by volume (ABV).

Benefits of Dandelion Wine

Traditionally, dandelions were used to make wine, which was thought to be a health tonic. Making wine is an excellent method of preserving some of the dandelion’s nutritional value. The following are some of the health advantages associated to dandelions, which will also be present in the wine in some form.

  • Traditionally, dandelions were used to make wine, which was thought to be good for your health. Some of the nutrients found in dandelion can be preserved by fermenting it into wine. Dandelion flowers are said to have several health advantages, which will be reflected in the wine.

Drink Your Dandelions

A excellent method to preserve the flavors of spring and summer in a bottle is to make Dandelion Wine. Possibly your new favorite wine will be this fragrant, flowery concoction! LoveToKnow Media was founded in the year 2022. All intellectual property rights are retained.

Enjoy Spring Year-Round by Making Traditional Dandelion Wine

Nutrition Facts(per serving)
180 Calories
0g Fat
47g Carbs
1g Protein

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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 22
Amount per serving
Calories 180
% Daily Value*
Total Fat0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol0mg 0%
Sodium10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate47g 17%
Dietary Fiber 1g 5%
Total Sugars 42g
Protein1g
Vitamin C 18mg 89%
Calcium 25mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 166mg 4%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Nutrition information is generated using an ingredient database and should be regarded as an educated guess at this time. A lot of people have heard about dandelion wine, but they may not have had the opportunity to try it or even make it for themselves. Using this technique, you may bottle up the bright yellow hue of dandelion blooms in the springtime. Despite the use of sugar in the recipe, the final product is a wonderfully dry wine when it has been fully fermented. Dandelion wine has been compared to mead since it has a little honey flavor to it.

Dandelions take around two years to ferment, so if you have never produced wine before, be prepared to be patient with the process.

  • Dandelions, 1 gallon filtered water, the zest and juice of 3 medium lemons, the zest and juice of 3 medium oranges, 2 quarts dandelion blossoms sugar (granulated): 1 1/2 pounds 3/4 pound of golden raisins, finely chopped 1-tablespoon yeast nutrition (optional) 2 tablespoons cornmeal
  • 1 (5-gram) package wine yeast or a combination of the two a half teaspoon of baking yeast Optional: 1 cup simple syrup (optional)
  1. Dandelions, 1 gallon filtered water, the zest and juice of 3 medium lemons, the zest and juice of 3 medium oranges, 2 quarts dandelions, 1 gallon filtered water sugar (granulated): 1 1/2 pound gold raisins, 3/4 pound (chopped) 1 tbsp. yeast nutritionist Cornmeal (about 2 tablespoons)
  2. 1 (5-gram) package wine yeast (about 1 tablespoon) baking yeast (half a teaspoon) Optional: sugar and water
  3. 1 cup simple syrup

Tips

  • Ensure that the dandelion blossoms you use for this wine are free of pesticides and other pollutants when you are gathering them. Before you use them, make sure you completely rinse them. Use a non-reactive container, such as glass, food-safe plastic, or ceramic, to prevent the food from becoming reactive. Anything made of metal should not be used unless it has been coated with enamel and is free of chipping. When considering whether or not winemaking could be a good new pastime to pursue, you might want to consider purchasing a hand corker from a winemaking supplies store. They are inexpensive and perform significantly better than corkscrews in terms of bottle security.

Does Dandelion Wine Have Alcohol?

Dandelion wine does contain alcohol once it has gone through the fermenting process. The alcohol content is normally comparable to that of white wine, however the exact amount will vary due to the fact that it is prepared from scratch.

What Part of the Dandelion Is Poisonous?

There is no dangerous portion of the dandelion, and the entire bloom and leaves are considered edible. Because they do not give much taste, the stems and leaves are not commonly employed in culinary preparations. Use only dandelions that have not been exposed to pesticides while planting your garden. This recipe has received a rating. This does not sit well with me. It’s hardly the worst case scenario. Yes, this will suffice. I’m a fan, and I’d suggest it. Amazing! It’s fantastic! Thank you for your feedback!

What is Dandelion Wine?

Despite the fact that dandelions are known as the brightly colored but extremely irritating weeds that crop up on your yard during the summer months, their petals may really be utilized to produce a fruit wine. Dandelion wine is commonly created by blending the petals of dandelion flowers with sugar, an acid such as lemon juice, and other winemaking agents to create a wine with a moderate alcohol concentration. Because there are only a few commercial wineries that manufacture this wine, it is generally created from scratch using a family recipe.

  1. The custom was carried on by pioneers in the Great Plains of North America, where dandelions may be found growing even in the most desolate and arid conditions.
  2. Dandelions are used to make wine, but the result is more like brandy than wine.
  3. If you use only the yellow petals, the drink will be fairly sweet; however, if you use the entire flower, the drink will be a bit more tangy.
  4. Dandelion wine is a therapeutic beverage that may be consumed in addition to assisting with intoxication.
  5. Dandelions are also a good source of iron.
  6. Check out this simple recipe for Dandelion Wine, and keep it in the fridge till your lawn is back to green.
  7. Dandelion blooms should be added last and allowed to stand for 5 minutes.

Pour the mixture into a plastic fermentor after stirring in the other ingredients. ALLOW THE WINE to mature for 3-4 days, or until the bubbles have stopped appearing. STRAIN into a glass container and allow the wine to mature for a week before serving. Enjoy!

InstructionsADD dandelion blossoms and let stand for 5 minutes.REMOVE the blossoms, and let the water cool to just above room temperature.STIR in the remaining ingredients and pour into a plastic fermentor.ALLOW the wine to ferment 3-4 days until the bubbles stop.STRAIN into a glass container and let the wine age for a week, then enjoy!

Can I drink old dandelion wine? Like, REALLY old …

Greetings, Dr. Vinny. We created dandelion wine 30 years ago and just recently discovered a bottle that had not been opened. Is it still in good condition? —Deneen from Newfield, New York Greetings, Deneen. This is the first time I’ve tried dandelion wine in a very long time. I recall it being lush and quite sweet, similar to a moderate Sauternes, although the bottle I had had not been matured for several years. I was perplexed by your question, so I embarked on a search for a commercial dandelion wine authority.

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In addition to making a sweet version of dandelion wine, Ken also creates a dry version that he describes as having delicate flavors, being green, and being evocative of a Sauvignon Blanc, which makes sense to me.

“The majority of ours are between two and three years old, and I’ve noticed that the scent of a meadow of dandelions strengthens throughout that period, and any green overtones go away.” However, 30 years is a long time to mature any type of wine, and Ken and I both questioned aloud about how the cork was holding up and whether the seal had stayed intact to prevent the wine from becoming oxidized over the aging process.

I’m guessing the fruit flavors have gone by now, and whatever is left within has a nutty undertone to it.

We’d be interested in hearing how it held up.

dandelion wine

This year, I decided to experiment with dandelion wine for the first time. It was the first of May, and there were a plethora of colorful dandelion blossoms blooming in the fields near my house. I picked them up between midday and 2:00pm, then raced them back home to hack off the green base and get rid of as much green material as I could before the sun set. Next, I frozen the petals for a whole night in order to get an early start on rupturing the cell walls and extracting the most amount of flavor as possible.

  1. As an example, here’s the information I have on this batch from my database (please excuse the mixed units; I’m Canadian): May Day is the name of the batch.
  2. The batch size is 1 gal/3.8 L in a jug (5 bottles) The project began on May 2, 2013, at 4:43 p.m.
  3. I came home immediately and chopped away the large green portion at the base of the plant as well as the green layer surrounding the blooms, which had began to shut up.
  4. While heating the water to a boil in a big saucepan, I placed the petals in a straining bag and tied it securely with kitchen string.
  5. I cooked it for 20 minutes on low heat before turning off the heat.
  6. Then I added the nutrition, the acid mixture, the sugar, and the peels of the lemons and oranges and mixed everything up thoroughly (peeling very thinly to avoid any of the white pith).
  7. Once this was done, I transferred it to a one-gallon jug and added the white grape concentrate.

Pay no attention to the fact that it seems to be swamp water.

My SG was exactly where I wanted it to be the following day (which was high, about 1.100), so I topped it off with water, retested it (which was still excellent), added the yeast and a little more yeast nutrition, and then sealed it with an airlock to keep the yeast from escaping.

When we got there, it looked like something out of an old science fiction film, what with the swamp water swirling and crashing all over the place.

After a few days, you may rack into a stabilization jug and add some clarifiers to taste.

ABV is currently at 14.8 percent of its maximum.

on May 2, 2013 Start 2:00 p.m.

It smelled spicy and lemony right away, despite the fact that it appeared like swamp water at first glance.

Note Extremely busy at the airlock – the air is really flowing!

9:00 a.m.

Like a good glass of wine!

on May 9, 2013 Racked Transferred to a new 1 gallon jug 9:00 p.m.

It flung 1cm of fresh sediment in 3 hours, yet it is still completely opaque to the light.

3.05 p.m.

It took a day for things to calm down, and the sky was still a bit overcast.

Battonage It was completely clean, so I went ahead and conducted a second battonage – I’ll do this again when it’s completely clear again.

on June 27, 2013 Battonage Finished with the battonage and will rack it to age for a few of weeks before filtering and bottling it.

Racked With a moderate proportion of fine lees, this wine is crystal transparent. 12th of July, 2013, 1:30 p.m. Bottled Tastes bright and fresh – better than expected, with ginger undertones as well as pleasant floral aromas. I also created a label, which reads as follows:

My First Dandelion Wine – A Gardener’s Table

The last day of March began bright and clear, with a gentle breeze blowing across the grass, which was flecked with gold. The weather conditions were ideal for collecting dandelions. Since I was twelve years old, when I first read Ray Bradbury’sDandelion Wine, I’ve been intrigued by the idea of producing the enigmatic concoction. To my nose, dandelions have almost no scent, and what little scent they do have is more grassy than fragrant. However, despite the fact that flower petals do not have the bitterness of the remainder of the plant, they also do not have much flavor at all.

  1. In Bradbury’s words, “the words were summer on the tongue” when he first heard of dandelion wine.
  2. One writer describes the wine as resembling sherry, while another describes it as resembling whisky, particularly if the green portions of the flower are included and the wine is aged properly.
  3. I needed to produce my own dandelion wine from scratch using a traditional recipe in order to understand what it should taste like.
  4. Those flowers were picked by my husband and me one year, and we only stopped when our young daughter pointed out the leaves.
  5. And the leaves aren’t the least bit thorny or fuzzy; instead, they’re smooth and thin, and they seem delicious enough to eat–which they are, if you like bitter greens–as they are.
  6. I picked the blooms in accordance with the instructions in various antique books: Snap a head off with one hand, and you’re done.
  7. Empty the remainder into a bucket.

Before I could select the blossom, I’d frequently have to pick off an insect from the ground.

The beetles, gluttons for bitterness, were savoring dandelions as a first dish while they awaited the arrival of my cucumbers, melons, squash, and beans, which they would devour come summer.

However, even with the additional time spent on pest management, I was able to pick a whole gallon of dandelion blooms in an hour and a half.

After that, I placed the pot on the kitchen counter for three days, stirring the mixture once a day throughout that time.

At this stage, old recipes differ slightly from one another.

Honey, Demerara sugar, malt sugar, raisins, or a mix of these ingredients are frequently called for in recipes.

In order to “enhance the flavor,” according to Rodale’s Encyclopedia of Herbs, you should then add citrus, generally ginger, and maybe another spice or two.

I mixed the ingredients together before bringing them to a boil and letting them simmer slowly for 20 minutes.

According to the ancient literature, you should place a slice of rye bread on top and put yeast of an undetermined variety on top of that.

I placed a loose-fitting lid on top of the bucket and placed it in a warm closet.

A coarsely woven nylon jelly bag was used to filter the boiling liquid before it was transferred to a gallon glass jug with a waterlock.

My jug was almost completely empty after I finished filling it, so I put the remainder into the refrigerator for later use, but not before tasting a little of it.

The wine in the jug will be bottled as soon as the fermentation process is complete.

And after that, I’ll tell you what I think of dandelion wine.

Will it help to strengthen my blood, as dandelions are claimed to do as well? Perhaps just one taste will cause me to shout, like the young child in Bradbury’s tale, “I’m a fire-eater!” Whoosh!” I’ll keep you informed as events unfold.

Dandelion Wine

Here are a few examples of what is wrong with this recipe: 1) Increase the number of dandelion blossoms by twofold. The optimal time to harvest the flowers is between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Take off all of the green parts, especially the green stem, which is quite bitter, before cooking them. The majority of the green sepals should be removed as well, but if a few make it through, that’s alright; they’ll help to give the flower some structure. Secondly, instead of 4 minutes, let the flowers to soak for 2 days instead.

3) After 2 days, sift the flowers out of the mixture and add the remaining ingredients (excluding the yeast), but just half the sugar, as has been suggested by others.

After 10 minutes of boiling, strain the liquid into your sanitized main fermenter and set aside.

Removing the liquid from the lees and racking it for 2 months before bottling is recommended once the bubbling has mainly stopped (10-14 days) (unless you like exploding bottles).

More information can be found at a total of 17 ratings

  • Here are a few points to consider about what is wrong with this dish: 1) Increase the number of dandelion blossoms by a factor of 2. In the mornings and afternoons, the flowers are at their peak. Take off all of the green parts, especially the green stem, which is quite bitter, before cooking the potatoes. It’s also best to remove the majority of the green sepals
  • But, if a few make it through, that’s alright
  • They’ll help to give the flower some shape and substance. Secondly, instead of 4 minutes, let the flowers to soak for 2 full days. During this time, keep the pot covered. 3) After 2 days, sift the flowers out of the mixture and add the remaining ingredients (excluding the yeast), but only half the sugar, as previously stated. 1 to 2 pounds (2-4 cups) of sugar would enough, depending on how dry or sweet you like your wine to be served. After 10 minutes, bring the liquid back to a boil and pour it into your sanitized main fermenter. Pour in the wine yeast and the fermentation lock once the mixture has cooled to around 30 degrees Celsius or 90 degrees Fahrenheit. (Note: baker’s yeast will work in a pinch.) Removing the liquid from the lees and racking it for 2 months before bottling is recommended once the bubbling has calmed (usually 10-14 days) (unless you like exploding bottles). If possible, let the wine mature in the bottle for at least a year before serving, however you’ll notice a noticeable improvement after only 6 months of storage. More information can be found at 18 People Have Voted

Here are a few examples of what is wrong with this recipe: 1) Increase the number of dandelion blossoms by twofold. The optimal time to harvest the flowers is between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Take off all of the green parts, especially the green stem, which is quite bitter, before cooking them. The majority of the green sepals should be removed as well, but if a few make it through, that’s alright; they’ll help to give the flower some structure. Secondly, instead of 4 minutes, let the flowers to soak for 2 days instead.

3) After 2 days, sift the flowers out of the mixture and add the remaining ingredients (excluding the yeast), but just half the sugar, as has been suggested by others.

After 10 minutes of boiling, strain the liquid into your sanitized main fermenter and set aside.

Removing the liquid from the lees and racking it for 2 months before bottling is recommended once the bubbling has mainly stopped (10-14 days) (unless you like exploding bottles).

More information can be found at This was a little too sweet for my taste, but I think I can tone it down next time – and it’s quite simple to prepare!

I’m planning to explore with this more in the future since I really enjoy it.

More information can be found at Advertisement This wine was created by myself throughout the summer.

It was very excellent!

It is necessary to regularly discharge the air from the balloons in order to prevent them from exploding.

I used coffee filters to filter out the sediment and then kept it in sterilized mason jars for later use.

More information can be found at We had a field in front of our old farm house with flowers that were 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

  • The dandelion greens were quite delicious.
  • People merely assumed they were weeds, and we would assist them in getting rid of them.
  • He would combine the ingredients in one of the old crocks and store them in the cellar.
  • As a result, the antique ceramic crocks perform well as formenting vessels.
  • Once upon a time, I brewed/brewed beer.
  • Are you brewing something?
  • After supper one night, something dropped to the floor beneath the table, causing a loud pop-pop-pop-pop.

As they were popping, they were aiming for the ceiling of the root cellar, which also happened to be the floor of the kitchen.

Make use of the crocks and let them sit in the forment till the bubbles subside.

So I’d try 6 or 7 cups of sugar next time, but other than that, the flavor and fizz were excellent!

Continue readingAdvertisement However, there is an empty lot across the street with plenty of dandelions, which I have not yet harvested.

It was a brilliant yellow and delicious treat.

More information can be found at I was astonished at how simple and quick it was to make this wine.

I used 7 cups of sugar, 2 oranges, and 2 lemons to make this dessert.

The ones that have a lemon and an orange slice on top are my favorites.

The sourness of the cranberry juice balances out the sweetness of the wine in a really pleasant way.

Read MoreExcellent results!

DO NOT attempt to substitute honey for sugar as it will not work well and will have an excessive amount of alcohol content as well as a lack of taste.

It is best to store in a cool, dark, and dry environment.

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