How To Drink Dessert Wine? (Correct answer)

These tongue-pleasing sippers are ideally enjoyed with dessert or as dessert itself. It’s also worth noting that dessert wines are meant to be served in small wine glasses, much as you would when sipping on a snifter of whiskey or bourbon.

What is dessert wine?

  • More specifically, dessert wine is usually sweet with pronounced flavor and higher alcohol content. For example, Port, Madeira, Sherry, and late-harvest wines are traditional dessert wines with more than 15% alcohol by volume (ABV).

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Can you drink dessert wine alone?

So don’t restrict yourself to aperitif or dessert for these intense, golden wines. Baly avoids small dessert wine glasses and goes for white wine glasses instead. She recommends serving at 9°C-10°C, but suggests, ‘a cooler temperature when wines are served with a spicy dish or a sweet dessert.

What do you use dessert wine for?

Dessert wines offer nuances and delicate flavours and eating a sweet, decadent dessert could mask them. Simple dessert pairings do best, such as Port with warm chocolate torte, or Ice Wine with homemade vanilla ice cream.

Does dessert wine need to breathe?

It’s unusual to decant a dessert wine, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea. A good sweet wine—like the d’Yquem—will certainly open up and become more expressive with air, so it’s a good call by the sommelier to serve it that way.

Do you put ice in dessert wine?

Adding ice will certainly dilute the flavor, but hey, it’s your wine. If you think it’s more refreshing with a couple of cubes, then go for it! The bottom line is that wine is meant to be enjoyed.

What goes best with dessert wine?

Perfect for sipping on a spring day or late summer evening, this dessert wine is extremely versatile. Try serving with poached pears, grilled peaches, fruit pies, nutty desserts like biscotti, or anything you like.

Are dessert wines bad for you?

Sweet wines are for everyone, not just for the ladies. However sweet wines contain high levels of sugar, either because it’s been added, or because the natural sugars haven’t all been turned into alcohol. Consequently they contain more calories, and less of the health benefits of their drier counterparts.

What can I do with leftover dessert wine?

After the Party: 6 Ways to Use Leftover Wine

  1. 1 Freeze it. Pour leftover wine into ice cube trays or muffin tins and freeze it to use in future recipes.
  2. 2 Make wine syrup.
  3. 3 Make wine jelly.
  4. 4 Turn it into vinegar.
  5. 5 Use it to flavor salt.
  6. 6 Cook dinner with it.

What is the use of decanter?

Super simple: a wine decanter is a vessel (usually made of glass) used to serve wine. The process of decanting wine, then, is the act of pouring the wine from a bottle into the decanter. In the home setting, you’ll use the decanter to serve the wine into individual glasses.

How long can you leave wine in a decanter?

If stored in the decanter, you’ll want to be sure to enjoy it within 2 to 3 days. Storing wine any longer than that once it has been opened is not recommended.

How long should wine breathe in bottle?

How to let a wine breathe depends on the age of the wine and how long it has been in the bottle. A younger wine, say less than 3 years old does not need much if any time. A wine 10 or more years old will benefit from an hour of air time.

Do you drink wine cold or warm?

Red wines taste best served between 60 and 65 degrees, with light-bodied wines like Pinot Noir at cooler temperatures and full-bodied red wine at the warmer end of the range. White Wines: White wines, along with tinted rosés, are served lightly chilled, typically between 50 and 60 degrees.

How do you properly drink wine?

To drink the wine, take a small sip and swirl the wine in your mouth, so you can fully absorb the flavor with your taste buds. You can hold the wine for about five seconds, then swallow, and savor the aftertaste. Fine wines linger on the palate for longer. This is especially true when drinking red wine.

Should you put wine in the fridge?

Does wine need to be refrigerated after opening? Yes! Just as you store open white wine in the refrigerator, you should refrigerate red wine after opening. Beware that more subtle red wines, like Pinot Noir, can start turning “flat” or taste less fruit-driven after a few days in the refrigerator.

A Beginner’s Guide To Dessert Wine

Non-fortification procedures include the addition of sugar to the wine or the naturally occurring concentration of sugars in the grapes before they are picked, among other possibilities. Unfortified wines are available in a variety of varieties, the most prevalent and widely consumed of which being ice wines and botrytis cinerea wine. Ice Wine is a type of wine that is served chilled. History of Ice Wine – Ice wine (or Eiswein, as it is known in Germany and Austria) is typically produced in wine-producing regions that are subjected to predictable cold periods.

When a cold spell hits, the grapes begin to shrivel and freeze.

Ice wine is particularly popular in Canada and Germany, however it is also produced in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and New Zealand, among other places.

Ice wine is a very sweet, extremely fruity, but also rather acidic wine that is perfect for pairing.

Ice wine is also one of the few wines that may be served with a chocolate dessert, which is rare in the wine world.

Botrytis cinerea wine (also known as “Noble Rot” wine) was named after a fungus that kills grapes under particular climatic circumstances, which may surprise some people.

How Sweet It Is: A Guide to Dessert Wine

An absolutely beautiful way to conclude a dinner. Because dessert wines are such a broad category, it is likely that you haven’t yet discovered the kind that suits your tastes and preferences. Sipping a dessert wine while enjoying a creamy flan, a slice of dark chocolate cake, or a cheese board is a fantastic way to end a dinner in the evening. Alternatively, skip dessert altogether and close the dinner on a sweet note with glasses of sauternes, ice wine, or port instead.

Dessert Wine Basics

It should come as no surprise that all dessert wines begin with grapes that have a high concentration of natural sugar. When that natural sugar is transformed into alcohol during the fermentation process, the wine is referred to be “dry.” Wines that have had all of the natural sugar fermented out of them are referred to as “sweet.” In the case of dessert wines, winemakers halt the fermentation process early in order to preserve the natural sweetness. Depending on the grape variety, dessert wines can range from a little hint of sweetness to a full-on sugar-bomb in terms of sweetness.

Acidity is essential in creating a superb dessert wine because it stops all of that sweetness from becoming too cloying and adds depth, vibrancy, and a sense of “lift” to the experience of drinking it!.

Sparkling Dessert Wine

If you’re looking for something light, sweet, and delicate, sparkling dessert wines are the way to go. The bubbles in these wines, which are light, effervescent, and often low in alcohol, make them joyful and enjoyable to drink at any time of day. Look for sweet sparkling wines derived from grapes such as muscat, brachetto, riesling, or torrontes. When served with fresh fruit desserts such as an Orange and Yogurt Tart or a simple Fruit Platter with Whipped Ricotta, these wines are perfect for brunch.

Concentrated, Rich Dessert Wine

There are a few of different techniques for creating these exceptionally rich wines. Prior to crushing the grapes, procedures are performed to concentrate the sugar content of the grapes using any of the several ways. One method is to create a late-harvest wine, which involves keeping the grapes on the vine for as long as possible into the growing season in order to get maximum sugar levels, sometimes even until the first frost has arrived (known as ice wine). It is also possible to make wine using the passito process, in which grapes are dried on straw mats, resulting in delicious raisins that are then fermented into wine.

Toutes of these exquisite dessert wines have an opulent, thick texture with complex aromas of honey, marmalade, and spices to complement them.

Dried Dates and Blue Cheese or Blue Cheese Gougeres with Caramel and Salt are two traditional pairings that you should try out.

Fortified wines are typically between 18 and 20 percent alcohol by volume, making them ideal for keeping warm throughout the harsh winter months.

Port

Ruby port, which has more dark, rich fruit to it and is a popular combination with chocolate truffles, whereas tawny port, which has more butterscotch, caramel, and nutty overtones, is a more recent addition to the family of port varieties. Try pairing a tawny port with a cheese plate for an after-dinner feast that will be remembered!

Sherry

Sherry is a fortified wine produced in the Spanish region of Andaluca, on the country’s southern coast. The first crucial thing to know about sherry is that it ranges from bone-dry and delicate to crazily rich and syrupy, depending on the variety. For dessert, search for sherries in the following three types: cream, moscatel, and Pedro Ximenez. While dry varieties like as fino and Amontillado are popular as aperitifs and are making a reappearance on bar menus as the foundation for cocktails, dessert sherries should be sweet (PX).

Dessert sherries are bursting with rich tastes such as chocolate, toffee, almonds, and figs, among others. PX sherry may be served over ice cream, and cream style sherries pair well with custard-based sweets such as flan or crème caramel, which are both popular in Spain.

Madeira

Madeira is a fortified wine that was called for the island where it was produced, which is approximately four hundred kilometers off the coast of North Africa. From the fifteenth through the seventeenth century, the island of Madeira served as a port of call for ships sailing to the New World and the East Indian Ocean. The early Madeiras were produced as a wine that could withstand travel: brandy was frequently added to the barrels to keep the wine from deteriorating during the journey. The tremendous heat from travelling around the equator, along with the continual movement of the ships, resulted in the wine becoming organically concentrated and oxidized.

The fact that Madeira has previously been effectively “cooked” means that it is famed for never spoiling: there is Madeira from the late 18th century that is still wonderfully palatable today.

How To Drink Sweet Wines Like A Pro

“The wine of kings, and the kings of wines,” as Louis XIV referred to Tokaj’s delicate, sweet asz wines, which are known for their elegance and sweetness. Sweet wines from throughout the world, ranging from off-dryRiesling to effervescentMoscato to full-on dessert wines like asz or its French counterpartSauternes, may be a very excellent complement for a variety of cuisines and events. Many of us have had a bad experience with a flabby, painfully sweet Moscato or an excessively sugared Riesling, and as a result, we have vowed to never drink sweet wines again.

  • What is the point of drinking sweet wines?
  • It is true that sweet wine contains residual sugar, because the yeasts did not eat all of the sugar during the fermentation process.
  • In addition, they have the capacity to complement the tastes of food in a way that is not always possible with dry wines.
  • Don’t let a drop pass you by!
  • Here are a few examples of truly excellent sweet wines, as well as some recommendations for what to serve them together.
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Moscato

Forget about that Nicki Minaj Fusion Moscato you were drinking earlier. True aperitivo is produced in a traditional manner, tastes excellent, and is adaptable – it may be served as an appetizer or as a dessert. In most cases, the grape used to make this frizzante (lightly bubbly) wine is Moscato Bianco. When properly prepared, good Moscato has a rich perfume of wildflowers, peaches, and lemon curd that comes naturally from the grape. It is expected that the highest-quality Moscato will come from the DOCG region of Asti in Piemonte – and that it will be called “Moscato d’Asti” as a result.

Pairing Suggestions: Do as the Italians do and have an aperitivo consisting of Moscato, charcuterie, olives, and miniature sandwiches. Alternatively, Moscato and cake might be served as a dessert.

Riesling

It was common throughout the 1980s and 1990s to see “Riesling” branded on bulk-produced white wine, even though it was more likely to be a combination of inexpensive white grapes with a large amount of sugar added to it. Due to this, Riesling has earned an unjustly terrible reputation, but thankfully, winemakers in Germany (the grape’s original country) and other countries have worked hard to restore the grape’s reputation via meticulous vineyard and winery management. Stunning off-dry and sweet Riesling may be produced because Riesling has naturally strong acidity and minerality, which allows the wines to develop a great level of complexity.

Complement with: It goes without saying that an off-dry (Kabinett) Riesling is an excellent match for incredibly spicy Asian food, whether it’s from Thailand, India, or Szechuan.

In addition to pairing perfectly with a fruit pie if you can get your hands on a bottle of fully-sweet Riesling (Auslese, Spatlese, or Beerentrockenlese), it’s also fantastic with fatty pig slices in a main course since the sweetness pairs beautifully with the fat.

Sauternes

It is created from botrytized Semillon grapes from Bordeaux and is a high-priced, excellent, sweet, limited-production wine with a long shelf life. A favorable rot known as botrytis develops when grapes are left on the vines late in the harvest season, increasing their ripeness and sweetness factor while simultaneously decreasing their alcohol content. Botrytis is a critical component in the production of dessert wines because it increases the amount of sugar in the wine and reduces the amount of alcohol in the wine.

Pour Sauternes with the stinkiest cheese you can find and a slice of pie to accompany it.

Aszú

Long believed to be one of the world’s best sweet wines, Hungarian aszu is now being recognized as such. So, how come you haven’t heard of it before? In any case, 45 years of Communism (and, as a result, State control of agricultural land and production) had a toll on the Hungarian wine sector, which has taken a long time to recover. However, sweet aszo wines are now available on the market, and they’re quite delightful. As with the Sauternes from France, asz are prepared from white grapes (usually Furmint) that have been allowed to develop noble rot before being fermented.

Incredibly delicious, a well-made asz is not only rich of fruit and floral notes, but it is also laced with an almost ethereal acidity that contrasts the sweetness of the wine.

With what to serve: Hungary is a country that produces foie gras and pork, and the Hungarians prefer drinking asz with these rich and fatty dishes in general. You should definitely give it a go.

Ice Wine

The process of making ice wine is incredible: in the middle of winter, courageous winemakers venture out into the vineyards and collect grapes that have frozen on the vine, before fermenting them in a cold cellar. It’s a time-consuming process that many wineries would rather avoid; as a result, some of them manufacture ice wine by simply freezing the grapes after harvesting them and then adding sugar to the mixture. To put it another way, authentic ice wine is a rare pleasure. It is often sourced from Canada, the Finger Lakes, or Germany, and is prepared from Riesling or a cold-hardy hybrid varietal, such as Vidal Blanc, to provide a crisp, refreshing taste.

If you get your hands on a bottle, you’ll be overjoyed!

Port

Port is a fortified wine produced in Portugal’s Douro Valley that has just the right amount of sweetness to go perfectly with your Thanksgiving pies and desserts. Ruby Port, which is the least costly and youngest of the Port varieties, and Tawny Port, which is kept in barrels for a longer period of time to develop a darker hue. Old Tawny Port is aged in oak barrels for at least six years, during which time it acquires a delicate, silky texture that is a superb complement to a memorable dinner.

With: At the end of your dinner, serve Port with a piece of room-temperature blue cheese, and you will be in heaven.

Originally published on December 10, 2015.

How to serve fortified and sweet wines

Although we are all familiar with the many types of white, red, rosé, and sparkling wines, we are less familiar with sweet and fortified wines. It’s easy to ignore these unparalleled, flavor-packed classics – because that’s exactly what they are – simply because we’re not sure how, when, or with what to serve them. As a result, we turned to the professionals for practical advice as well as some intriguing culinary combinations. The discovery of other worlds beyond the exquisite but cliched Port-Stilton and Sauternes-foie gras pairings of old .

Nobly sweet wines

Winemaker Heidi Schröck from Rust in Austria’s Burgenland area prefers to serve her wines between 12°C and 14°C. She makes a nobly sweet Ruster Ausbruch as well as auslese, beerenauslese (BA), and trockenbeerenauslese (TBA) wines. She like ‘unexpected and innovative flavor combinations,’ and she makes this evident on her packaging and labelling. she says, but she also offers pairing prosciutto with spätlese or aged Gouda with BA, chili-cheese sausages with Ausbruch, or a lamb tagine with Ausbruch if you’re looking for something different.

  1. Chef Aline Baly of Château Coutet in the Bordeaux region has mastered the art of presenting sweet wines with each meal at her establishment.
  2. So don’t limit yourself to an aperitif or a dessert wine when it comes to these powerful, golden wines.
  3. “A colder temperature when wines are served with a hot entrée or a sweet dessert,” she says, referring to the recommended serving temperature of 9°C to 10°C.
  4. It is possible to serve middle-aged wines a couple of degrees warmer in order to enable the warm baking spices to manifest themselves.

‘These wines have a lot of character,’ Baly explains. “The idea that you can keep a bottle open for more than a week is something that many people are unaware of.” ‘ Schröck concurs, saying that Auslesen can endure for up to ten days and intense Ausbruch can last for up to three weeks. .

Matching Sauternes and Barsac with food

Only vintage Ports, according to Anthony Symington, brand manager for Symington Family Estates (which produces the Port labels Graham’s, Warre’s, Dow’s, and Cockburn’s), should be decanted before serving. Ruby and reserve Ports have “strong, youthful aromas of red fruits,” according to the author, while barrel-aged tawny Ports have “greater complexity, nuts, and raisins,” according to the author. Ruby and reserve Ports “should be served at room temperature” and are “delicious with cheese or dark chocolate,” according to the author.

However, he suggests serving tawny port with creamy desserts such as ice cream, crème brûlée, or a sneaky square of chocolate.

In the event that you have access to mature vintage Port, Symington recommends serving creamy cheeses rather than Stilton, which can dominate these magnificent old wines.

Creamsweet Sherry

Tim Holt, the area director for Bodegas Barbadillo in the United Kingdom, lifts the lid on sweet Sherry types such as sweet oloroso and tooth-breakingly sweet Pedro Ximénez, or PX, and even brings back the much-maligned cream Sherry from the dead in this article. He recommends serving cream and oloroso cold in a tulip-shaped wine glass, although any wine glass would do for the occasion. When it comes to PX, he recommends the following: ‘Pour it over vanilla ice cream or try it in a tumbler glass over crushed ice.’ It works really well in this manner.’ PX is very wonderful when served with Bourbon Vanilla Ice Cream.

Hot Mexican habanero and Sichuan foods are also recommended: ‘Because of the high sugar content, it has a balsamic effect, which makes it ideal for these highly hot recipes.’ You’ll know what to do with all of that leftover turkey from Thanksgiving.

While sweet oloroso may be stored in the refrigerator for up to three months, PX does not require refrigeration and is so sweet that it can be stored for “up to a year at a time.”

Sherry and chocolate pairing ideas

Tim Holt, the area director for Bodegas Barbadillo in the United Kingdom, lifts the lid on sweet Sherry types such as sweet oloroso and tooth-breakingly sweet Pedro Ximénez, or PX, and even brings back the much-maligned cream Sherry from the dead, according to Tim Holt. He recommends serving cream and oloroso cooled in a tulip-shaped wine glass, although any wine glass would suffice in this case. ‘Pour it over ice cream or try it in a tumbler glass over crushed ice,’ he recommends for PX. ‘ When done this manner, it works exceptionally well.’ PX is particularly wonderful when served with Bourbon Vanilla Ice Cream.

Hot Mexican habanero and Sichuan foods are also recommended: ‘Because of the high sugar content, it has a balsamic effect, which makes it ideal for these really spicy recipes.’ What to do with leftover turkey is now clear to you.

The sweetness of PX makes it last for up to three months in the refrigerator, but sweet oloroso requires refrigeration and is so sweet that it may last from one year to the next.

Leftover lusciousness: use every drop

The chef at Quinta do Noval in the Douro Valley transforms leftover late bottled vintage or vintage Port into a delicious, sweet sauce for pancakes, which he serves with fresh fruit. ‘A hefty pat of butter, two teaspoons of brown sugar, and a full glass of Port are required for four persons.’ In a saucepan, melt the butter with the sugar until it is boiling, then stir in the Port and serve. Never stop stirring with a wooden spoon, no matter how tired you are. Allow the alcohol to evaporate for approximately four minutes, or until the sauce thickens.

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This is filled with a digestive biscuit crumbled on top of some sultanas, 30ml of Sherry, and a layer of fresh custard on top of that.

Once the double cream has set, apply another layer on top.

What can I do with leftover wine? Ask Decanter

Using leftover late-bottled vintage or vintage Port from Quinta do Noval in the Douro Valley, chef Maria Joo creates a fruity, sweet sauce for pancakes. “A hefty pat of butter, two teaspoons of brown sugar, and a full glass of Port” is what you’ll need to feed four people. The butter and sugar are melted in a skillet, and when the mixture begins to bubble, you add the Port wine. Continue to stir constantly with a wooden spoon. Continue cooking until the alcohol has completely evaporated (approximately four minutes), then add the flour and cook until thoroughly combined.

” Davy’s London tavern The BootFlogger in Southwark is famous for its Bramdean pudding, which uses amontillado as a crucial component.

Small ramekin dishes are required for each pudding.

Once the double cream has been applied, it may be removed.

Serve True Dessert Wines with Dessert

When it comes to matching wine with dessert, one of the most common mistakes wine enthusiasts make is concentrating too much on the flavor of the wine itself rather than thinking how the wine will interact with the food. Even if a bottle of 2005 Château Pontet-Canetis is uncommon and of high quality, if you serve this wine together with a sweet dessert, the wine may appear overly acidic and tannic in contrast. The combination does this great wine absolutely no honor at all, in my opinion. When your taste receptors are exposed to high-sugar meals such as pie or cheesecake, they get momentarily acclimated to the high quantities of sugar.

  • This is true whether you’re pouring a $20 bottle of table wine or a $5,000 bottle of Pétrus, among other things.
  • For one thing, it allows you to commemorate a particular event by sharing your wine with friends and family, or simply enjoy the wine that you have carefully selected.
  • A proper dessert wine is either extremely sweet or fortified with distilled spirits, such as brandy, to make it more robust.
  • Tokaji, Viognier, and some varieties ofRiesling are among of the other popular and valued sweet wines produced.

When purchasing a high-quality dessert wine collection, there are a few aspects that you should keep in mind.

Getting Creative with Dessert Wine Pairings

It’s not necessary to restrict yourself to vintageTaylor Fladgate orChâteau d’Yquem when looking for the perfect dessert wine to complement your meal (although these are foolproof selections). There is no restriction on the type of wine you may serve with your dessert, as long as the wine is on the sweeter side of the spectrum and fits the flavor of your dessert. For example, fruit-based sweets that are lower in sugar content can be combined with wines that are lower in sugar content. Desserts that are more indulgent and rich (such as chocolate pots de crème) will combine better with wines that are sweeter in flavor.

  1. In order to select the best wine for any dessert, one of the simplest strategies is to reject any wines that are much lighter or darker in color than the dessert that will be served.
  2. Although this guideline is not always applicable, it will assist you in narrowing down your selection of probable pairings to only the most dependable ones.
  3. Are there any characteristics in the wine’s tasting notes that are similar to the ones in your dessert?
  4. Additionally, Sauternes is known for its tropical fruit notes, which would pair nicely with any foods that have a lot of citrus or pineapple.
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The Best Dessert Wine Pairings for Holiday Classics

It should be simple to create your own dessert wine combination if you follow the fundamental rules outlined above. Alternatively, if you’re looking for some inspiration, we’ve compiled a list of tasty (and valued) wines to pair with traditional holiday treats.

Crème brûléeand custards

Any custard-based dessert should be paired with a sweet white wine. Wines with a tropical or citrus fruit taste complement this dish particularly well since the custard’s richness makes them a good match for the wine. Custard and wines with caramel flavors go along like peanut butter and jelly.

  • Among the wines available are Château D’Yquem (2014), Domaine Charbay Charbay (1997), Château Pajzos Tokaji Esszencia (1993), and Château Pajzos Tokaji Esszencia (2014).

Fresh fruit or fruit pies

Match the fruit notes in your wine with the fruit notes in your pastries. Wines that match well with stone fruits (such as peaches) are white wines, whereas red wines that pair well with dark fruits (such as cherry, plum, or blackberry) are red wines.

  • Château D’Yquem, 2001 vintage
  • Taylor Fladgate Porto Vintage (2016 vintage)
  • 2013 Royal Tokaji Aszo 5 Puttonyos Red Border
  • 2013 Royal Tokaji Aszo 5 Puttonyos Red Border

Pecan pie and other extremely sweet desserts

Pecan pie’s extremely sweet and robust tastes will overshadow practically any wine, with the exception of a high-quality port.

  • 2017 Fonseca Vintage Port
  • 2017 Taylor Fladgate Porto Vintage

Chocolate cake and other dark chocolate treats

Pair chocolate cake with a hearty red wine, such as port, to complete the meal.

  • Dow’s Vintage Port (2017 vintage)
  • Quinta Do Noval Nacional Vintage Port (2016 vintage)
  • 2009 Taylor Fladgate Vintage Port (2009 vintage). Quinta De Vargellas Vinha Velha Vintage Port
  • Quinta De Vargellas Vinha Velha Vintage Port
  • Quinta De Vargellas

The wines you purchase not only provide a fantastic dessert wine complement for any holiday gathering, but they also serve as a long-term financial asset should you decide to store the wine and resell it in the future as well.

Collecting Dessert Wines

When it comes to financial investments, a wine collection is unusual because you have the option of either drinking your bottles right away or storing them and reselling them for a profit once their value has increased. Neither sweet dessert wines nor superb tannic wines like Nebbiolo or Sangiovese are exempt from this rule. When investing in white wines, Sauternes, particularly Château d’Yquem, might be an excellent choice, especially if purchased young or en primeur. Therefore, it’s necessary to have at least a few dessert wines in your collection, even if you’re not sure if you’ll drink them during the current holiday season or not.

Dessert wines, in a way, have some of the greatest versatility of any type of wine available on the market.

By having a number of dessert wines ready and waiting in your house or in a professional storage facility, you can add a touch of luxury to the holidays while also adding considerable value to your investment portfolio and increasing the value of your investment portfolio.

Contact us today to have access to some of the world’s most exquisite wines.

Author:Vinfolio Staff

At Vinfolio, we assist our clients with the purchase, sale, storage, and management of their most prized bottles of wine. While working, we’re just a group of passionate and slightly crazy oenophiles who like nothing more than a good glass of vintage Champagne, followed by a Burgundy, and then a Bordeaux to get the party started. We’re continually obsessing about the latest (and oldest) vintages, and we want to share our expertise and enthusiasm for wine with our readers through this website.

How to Pair Wine with Chocolate (and Other Desserts)

Discover more about our review method here. Our editors independently investigate, test, and suggest the finest goods. We may gain a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links. What’s the difference between wine and chocolate? There is no longer any reason to do so, thanks to the abundance of delectable dessert wines available. Contrary to common perception, your favorite bottle of red wine is definitely not the best pairing for your favorite sweet treat. However, with so many different alternatives available, you’re sure to discover the ideal bottle to complement your dessert.

What Is the Most Important Rule for Pairing Wine with Chocolate?

Wine and chocolate go together like peanut butter and jelly, and the golden rule for combining them is that the wine should always be sweeter than the dessert.

Reduced sweetness in the wine often results in a less-than-delightful flavor that is sour or bitter to the extreme. You’ll be on your way to a delectable match in no time if you remember just one rule: keep it simple.

Can I Pair Dry Wines with Chocolate?

Dry wines, on the whole, don’t pair well with chocolate, for the most part. If you want to match wine with chocolate (or other sweet delights), always remember that the former should be sweeter than the latter, according to the golden rule mentioned above. Exceptions can be made in rare cases (for example, Beaujolais or Zinfandel), but we recommend erring on the side of caution and opting for a bottle of sweet wine rather than a sweet wine.

Do Certain Wines Go Better with Milk Chocolate Versus Dark Chocolate?

In a way, yes! Certain wines will pair well with different types of chocolate (see our quick reference guide below), while milk and dark chocolate pairings are more interchangeable than white chocolate pairings (see our quick reference guide below). The sweetness of the chocolate is responsible for this.

Are Fortified Wines Good with Chocolate?

Absolutely! Fortified wines are some of the greatest matches with chocolate that can be found. While many white-grape-based fortified wines (think lighter sherry varieties) pair well with both white and darker chocolates, we recommend conserving red fortified wines (such as port) for drinking with milk or dark chocolate instead of the other way around.

Which Wines Pair Best with Chocolates That Contain Nuts or Other Fillings?

It is dependent on the type of chocolate. Before thinking about the fillings, we recommend starting with the basic chocolate (white, milk, or dark). Remember that coming up with your own unique and imaginative wine and chocolate combinations can be a lot of fun as well. Do you happen to have a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup handy? Try mixing it with a sweet sparkling red wine for a taste that is reminiscent of peanut butter and jelly. Do you like chocolates with caramel filling? Consider mixing it with wines (tawny port, for example) that have similar caramel flavors for an out-of-this-world experience.

A Quick Guide

Wines that pair with white chocolate include the following: Late-harvest Moscato d’Asti (Moscato d’Asti Late-Harvestriesling) Sauternes gewurztraminer, for example. Ice wine is a type of wine that is frozen (eiswein) Wines that go well with milk chocolate include: Portuguese: (ruby or tawny) Madeira is a small island off the coast of Portugal (malmsey) Brachetto d’acquiRutherglenmuscato d’acqui d’acqui Sherry (amontillado or oloroso) is a kind of sherry. Wines that pair with dark chocolate include the following: Natural wine (banyuls/maury) with a sweet taste Sherry from Pedro Ximenez Recioto della Valpolicella (Valpolicella Recioto) Vin santo (holy wine) (Italy) Here are six different bottles to try.

Dessert wine – Wikipedia

The term “sweet wine” links to this page. Sweet Wine (musical composition by Mark Williams) is a song written by Mark Williams (song). Fresh Cream is a song by the band Cream. For other uses, see Fresh Cream. The dessert wine, also known as pudding wine in the United Kingdom, is a sweet wine that is generally served with a sweet dessert. A dessert wine cannot be defined in a straightforward manner. When it comes to dessert wines in the United Kingdom, any sweet wine consumed with a meal is regarded a dessert wine, as opposed to the white fortified wines (fino and amontilladosherry) used before the meal and the red fortified wines (port and Madeira) consumed after the meal.

In contrast, in the United States, a dessert wine is classified as any wine that contains more than 14 percent alcohol by volume, which includes all fortified wines—and as a result, it is taxed at a higher rate as a result.

Methods of production

Château d’Yquem 1999, a noble rot wine from the Loire Valley Dessert wine producers are interested in producing a wine that contains high quantities of both sugar and alcohol. Because all winemaking results in the production of alcohol through the fermentation of carbohydrates, they are often traded off. However, there are a variety of methods for increasing the relative sugar levels in the finished wine:

  • Grow grapes such that they naturally contain enough sugar for both sweetness and alcohol
  • Add sugar in one of the following ways:
  • Sugar or honey (Chaptalization) is added before fermentation
  • Unfermented must (Süssreserve) is added after fermentation.
  • Prior to the completion of the sugar fermentation process (fortification or’mutage ‘), remove water from the sugar solution to concentrate the sugar solution:
  • In warm areas, raisin wine may be produced by drying the grapes in the open air. In colder locations, you may produce ice wine by freezing off a portion of the water. When growing grapes in moist temperate areas, a fungal infection called Botrytis cinerea is used to desiccate the grapes, which causes noble rot.

Natural sweetness

A late harvest Semillon from the state of Washington. In the lack of alternative methods, producers of dessert wines are forced to create their own sugar in the vineyard. Some grape varietals, such as Muscat, Ortega, and Huxelrebe, yield significantly more sugar than others due to their genetic makeup. Final sugar levels are greatly influenced by environmental factors; thevigneroncan assist by leaving the grapes on the vine until they are fully ripe, as well as by green picking and trimming to expose the young grapes to the light.

While the vigneron has little control over the sun, a sunny year helps to keep sugar levels under control.

However, most of the Muscats from antiquity, including the famousConstantiaof South Africa, were very certainly created in this manner.

Chaptalization

Honey was used to sweeten wine in ancient Rome, and it was also used to boost the ultimate strength of the finished product. Today, sugar is typically added to wines that are flabby and immature in order to increase the alcohol content rather than for sweetness, although a certain amount of chaptalization is authorized in the wines of certain nations. German wines must state whether they are ‘natural’ or not; chaptalization is prohibited from the highest levels of German wines in any event.

Süssreserve

Since the time of the Romans, honey has been used to sweeten wine and to boost the overall strength of the finished product. These days, sugar is most often used in immature, flabby wines rather than for sweetness; although, a certain amount of chaptalization is authorized in the wines of many nations, including the United States. German wines must state whether they are ‘natural’ or not; in any event, chaptalization is prohibited in the upper tiers of German wine production.

Fortification

Honey was used to sweeten wine in ancient Rome, and it was also used to boost the ultimate strength of the wine. Today, sugar is typically added to immature, flabby wines in order to increase the alcohol content rather than for sweetness, although a certain amount of chaptalization is authorized in the wines of several nations.

Chaptalization is prohibited from the top levels of German wines, regardless of whether they are labeled as “natural.”

Raisin wine

A glass of Piedmontese raisin wine, Calusopassito, was enjoyed. Sweet wine known as passum was produced at ancient Carthage from air-dried grapes, and comparable wines, known as Moscato Passito di Pantelleria and produced across the Malta Channel from the site of Carthage, are being produced today. The Romans were the first to describe such wines. ‘Passito’ wines are produced in Northern Italy, where the grapes are dried on straw, racks, or rafters before being pressed and fermented in barrels.

In the Jura, Rhone, and Alsace, the French make’straw wine’ (vin de paille); the Spaniards start with a raisin wine and Pedro Ximénez before fortifying it; the Cypriots have their ancientCommandaria; and there have been recent trials with the style in South Africa and the United States.

Ice wine

Most wine rules demand that the grapes for ice wine be gathered when the temperature is less than 7 degrees Celsius (19 degrees Fahrenheit). During such temperatures, some water in the grapes freezes, but the sugars and other solids in the grape juice remain dissolved in the remainder of the liquid. If the grapes are pressed while still frozen, a very concentrated must can be produced, which requires a particular yeast strain and an extended fermentation period. The resultant wines are quite sweet, yet their acidity helps to keep them balanced.

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The most well-known ice wines are German Eiswein and Canadian Icewine, although ice wines are also produced in smaller numbers in the United States, Austria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary, Italy, Australia, France, and New Zealand.

Noble rot wine

Wines such as TokajiAsz of Tokaj-Hegyaljain Hungary, Château d’Yquemof Sauternes, and Seewinkelof Austria are prepared from grapes that have been mouldy with Botrytis cinerea, which sucks the water out of the fruit while giving flavors of honey and apricot to the future wine. Noble rot is caused by a fungus that requires precise environmental conditions to thrive; if the environment is excessively moist, the same fungus may create destructivegrey rot. Vignerons make every effort to increase the quantity of noble rot produced while avoiding the loss of the entire crop to grey rot.

Because of the time it takes for noble rot to develop, these wines are typically picked late.

The fact that noble rot was a factor in Hungarian vineyard demarcation some 50 years before a messenger was allegedly mugged on his way to Schloss Johannisberg in Germany and that asz inventory predates it by approximately 200 years indicates that Hungary’s Tokaj was the first region to produce the wine.

Noble rot is also responsible for a variety of other dessert wines, including the German beerenauslese and trockenbeerenauslese (TBA) classifications, the French Monbazillac, the Austrian Beerenauslese, the Austrian Ausbruch, and other TBA-type wines from throughout the globe.

Serving

Vin Santo with almond cookies are a delicious combination. Generally speaking, the wine should be sweeter than the food it is served with; a perfectly ripe peach has been regarded as the ideal companion for many dessert wines, yet it makes sense not to drink wine at all with many chocolate- and toffee-based meals, for example, Vin doux naturel Muscats and red dessert wines such as Recioto della Valpolicella and fortified wines such as the vin doux naturel Muscat are the ideal complements for these difficult-to-pair treats.

Alternatively, the wine alone can serve as a dessert, although bakery sweets can also be a suitable complement, particularly when they include a hint of bitterness, such as biscuits dipped in Vin Santo (Santo wine).

White dessert wines are often served slightly chilled, however they can be served excessively cold if they are served too quickly.

References

  1. “The seven most important sorts of white wines.” Süssreserve was retrieved on April 27, 2019. Archived 2007-03-10 at the Wayback Machineon the Wine Dictionary website
  2. Amerine and Maynard’s “Wine.” Encyclopedia Britannica is a reputable reference work. Encyclopedia Britannica is a reputable reference work. Shoemaker, Ted (27 April 2019)
  3. Shoemaker, Ted (6 December 2013). “German Ice Wine Regulations Have Been Tightened.” This is according to Wine Spectator. retrieved on March 20, 2021
  4. CooksInfo is a website dedicated to providing information about cooking (4 October 2020). “Ice Wine,” as the name suggests. Cook’s Information, retrieved on March 20, 2021
  5. “The Beautiful Bounty of Botrytized Wines,” retrieved on March 20, 2021. Wine Enthusiast Magazine is a publication dedicated to wine enthusiasts. Steve Kolpan, Michael A. Weiss, and Brian H. Smith have published a paper in Science (2014). Winewise: Your Complete Guide to Understanding, Selecting, and Enjoying Wine is a comprehensive guide to understanding, selecting, and enjoying wine (2nd ed.). Jancis Robinson, MW, “Tokaji,” in Jancis Robinson, MW (ed. ), Jancis Robinson’s Concise Wine Companion (Oxford:Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 469–471, ISBN0-19-866274-2
  6. Gorman-McAdams, Mary. “Delicious Dessert Wines for Dessert Week.” Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN978-0-54433462-5 The Kitchn, retrieved on April 27, 2019
  7. “Three of the Best Italian Dessert Wines,” retrieved on April 27, 2019. Italy, November 12th, 2014
  8. Jeanne O’Brien Coffey is the author (20 November 2017). Sauternes is the perfect holiday wine for everything from appetizers to desserts, as revealed by Wine Spectator. Forbes

External links

  • Dessert wine is defined in the Wiktionary dictionary as follows:

Dessert Wines 101

RJS Craft Winemaking | November 23, 2017 | RJS Craft Winemaking As you prepare for all of the sweet treats, after dinner desserts, and celebrations that will be taking place this holiday season, we wanted to provide you with a crash course in dessert wines 101 to not only help you understand wines better – but also to provide you with some tips for serving and enjoying these rich, decadent beverages. What are Dessert Wines and How Do They Work? In the context of wine genres, a dessert wine is characterized as being sweet and lush, with flavors that are intense and concentrated.

  1. Dessert wines, such as Port and Vins Doux Naturels, can also be fortified wines, as can be found in some dessert wines.
  2. For your convenience, we’ve included some more information on them: Vidal, Riesling, and Cabernet Franc are examples of ice wines.
  3. Sugars and other dissolved substances do not freeze, but water does, allowing a more concentrated grape must to be pressed from the frozen grapes, resulting in a lesser volume of more concentrated, extremely sweet, viscous wine than would otherwise be produced from the grapes.
  4. Having experienced three consecutive days of temperatures below -10 degrees, the grapes are ready for harvest.
  5. Germany and Canada are the two countries that manufacture the most Ice Wines.
  6. The Nobel Prize for Rot: ‘Nobel rot,’ also known as Botrytis, is a form of fungus that shrivels and decays wine grapes that can arise in the course of ice winemaking on extremely rare instances.
  7. It has two effects on wine: it increases the sweetness level while also increasing the flavor richness.

Temperature for service: 6 to 9 degrees The following foods go well together: blue cheese with dried apricots, crème brûlée, and apple strudel.

Cru is a specialty.

Sherry, Port, and Madeira are examples of fortified wines.

In spite of the high brix, this results in an alcohol level of around 18 percent.

There are three different styles: Ruby, Vintage, and Tawny.

Red berries, raisins, chocolate, and spices make up the majority of the flavor profile.

Special Crafting Tip: You may also add Brandy to your handmade dessert wine before bottling to further customize it!

Serving Dessert Wines According to the Rules of Thumb Is it better to have it chilled or room temperature?

Red wines should be served at room temperature or slightly chilled.

Simple dessert combinations, such as Port with warm chocolate torte or Ice Wine with handmade vanilla ice cream, are the most successful, according to the experts.

Aside from that, these wines pair well with saltier dishes (think blue cheese!).

One common misperception regarding dessert wines is that they must be paired with a sweet dish.

While there are some incredible dessert combinations to go with these wines, the wine itself is also a fantastic treat on its own. Consider serving a handcrafted, luscious dessert wine as part of your holiday meal dessert this year to mix things up a bit.

Understanding Sweet Wines: How to Become a Dessert Wine Aficionado

Wining and dining is synonymous with affluent prosperity. Because of its strong link to religion, mythology, and tales, it has risen to the top of the list of the most popular alcoholic beverages of all time. Although it represents whole areas and territories, it is also closely connected to each and every individual on the planet, participating in the triumphs and misfortunes of every human being. We adore wine; we talk about it, we drink it, and we toast with it, and as a result, we value every glass of wine that we consume in celebration of life that we consume.

Sweet wines are a sort of wine that allows us to delve into the realm of sweetness and wine delicacies to a greater extent than any other.

All about Sweet Wines

A section dedicated to dessert wines exists despite the fact that there are many different classifications. Dessert wines are those that have a high sugar content and are commonly eaten after a meal. In addition, they are famous for the fact that they often contain a high concentration of alcohol. There are also alternative options available that do not include a significant percentage of ethanol. The sugar content of wine can range from 50 grams per liter of liquid to more than 400 grams per liter of liquid, depending on the variety.

Dessert wines can be produced with the use of alcoholic fortification, in which case they are classified as fortified wines, and as a result, not everyone is able to distinguish between the two types of wine.

Passito

It is known as Passito, a wine created from dehydrated grapes that has a high alcohol concentration and has captured the hearts of thousands of palates throughout history, and it is today considered to be one of the most highly sought-after wines in the world. When the first Greek immigrants arrived in Sicily, they brought the vines and winemaking skills that are used to produce Passito with them. Passito wine is a naturally sweet wine that, as a result of the fermentation process, develops particular qualities that distinguish it from other wines of the same style.

  • A number of factors contribute to its sluggish fermentation process, including a high concentration of residual sugars
  • The amount of time it spends maturing in barrels (between 3 and 4 years in barrels)
  • And its high residual sugar content. This product has a high quantity of ethanol.

This technique produces a passito wine with an alcohol concentration ranging from 14 percent to 18 percent, resulting in a full-bodied beverage that contains a significant amount of alcohol.

Botrytized Wines

Botrytis-infected grapes are used to make sweet wines, which are referred to as noble rot sweet wines or botrytis sweet wines, depending on how severe the botrytis infection was. No one knows where or when these wines first appeared or how long they have been produced using this approach, which makes it difficult to determine their origins or longevity. These wines have been there since the mid-16th century in Hungary’s Tokaji area, according to historical sources. These three places have historically produced some of the world’s greatest sweet botrytis wines, and they continue to do so today.

This notion has been carried over to the New World, where we may find instances of these wines in nations such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States, to name a few examples.

Late-Harvest Grapes

Because they are powerfully flavored and aromatic wines, they should be served extremely cold, between 6 and 8 degrees Celsius. For whatever reason, white grapes are used to manufacture the vast majority of these wines, however red grapes can be used in certain instances. Although the fragrances differ according on the grape variety utilized, they are often flowery and fruity in nature. They are thicker than other white wines and have a particular taste character that distinguishes them. Knowing that due of the high sugar content in late-harvest wines, they may be stored for an extended amount of time is important before purchasing them.

Ice Wine

Incredibly refreshing and defying all traditional criteria and procedures, ice wine is a wine that should not be missed. Despite its low price, it is not a wine to be taken lightly. When it comes to wine, the vineyard is where the magic happens, and this is even more true in the case of ice wine, which is produced in small batches. When grapes are picked under certain climatic circumstances that do not occur every year, they are transformed into ice wine, which is then manufactured under tight quality control standards to preserve its freshness.

This product has piqued the curiosity of a large number of consumers.

Fortified Sweet Wine

In the first place, these wines are fantastic selections when it comes to combining with chocolate. In contrast, cigar fans believe that their combination is a powerful elixir that can be enjoyed by everybody. The reality is that they are both powerful and contain a high proportion of alcohol, regardless of whether they are dry or sweet. If we were to try to define fortified wines, we might say that they are those that have had wine alcohol added to them. By using this method, you may effectively halt fermentation.

Wine will be created that will be either more or less sweet depending on when the winemaker decides to proceed with the procedure and when the grapes are harvested.

If the wine is created near the conclusion of the fermentation process, on the other hand, it will be drier in taste. The white and red variations of these sorts of wines are also readily accessible.

How to Pair Sweet Wine and When to Drink It?

It is essential to develop a harmonic balance in which both the wine and the meal complement and stand out independently of one another without canceling out the other in order to properly match a sweet wine with a sweet dish. As an aperitif, we propose pairing sweet wines with cheeses, foie gras, or almonds. Sweets are another popular use for sweet wines, and they are often offered alongside chocolate desserts, cakes, and ice creams. They may also be presented to lighten up after-dinner repasts.

Do you have a sudden hankering to get started right away?

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