How Much Wine Can You Drink While Breastfeeding? (Best solution)

Generally, moderate alcohol consumption by a breastfeeding mother (up to 1 standard drink per day) is not known to be harmful to the infant, especially if the mother waits at least 2 hours after a single drink before nursing.

  • The AAP says that while alcohol intake should be limited, an occasional drink is acceptable. Specifically, the AAP says nursing moms should have no more than 0.5 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight—which for a 60-kilogram mother (about 130 pounds), is about 2 ounces of liquor, an eight-ounce glass of wine, or two

Contents

Can I have a glass of wine after breastfeeding?

Many new moms want to know if they can safely enjoy a glass of wine while still breastfeeding responsibly. The simple answer is yes; a moderate limited amount of alcohol will not harm your baby in any way.

How much wine actually gets into breast milk?

When a lactating woman consumes alcohol, some of that alcohol is transferred into the milk. In general, less than 2 percent of the alcohol dose consumed by the mother reaches her milk and blood. Alcohol is not stored in breast milk, however, but its level parallels that found in the maternal blood.

Can I breastfeed after 2 wines?

Most health care professionals agree that drinking small amounts of alcohol while breastfeeding won’t hurt your baby.

Can baby get drunk from alcohol in breastmilk?

Can my baby get drunk from breast milk? If you nurse your baby too soon after drinking, your baby will consume alcohol, too. And babies cannot metabolize alcohol as quickly as adults, so they have longer exposure to it. “ Your baby probably won’t become drunk from breast milk,” says Dr.

Does wine increase breast milk?

Alcohol does NOT increase milk production, and has been shown to inhibit let-down and decrease milk production (see below). Never share a bed or other sleeping surface with your baby if you have been drinking.

What happens if baby drinks breast milk with alcohol one time?

Answer From Elizabeth LaFleur, R.N. Breast-feeding and alcohol don’t mix well. There’s no level of alcohol in breast milk that’s considered safe for a baby to drink. When you drink alcohol, it passes into your breast milk at concentrations similar to those found in your bloodstream.

When should I pump and dump?

After recreational drug use. If you use recreational drugs in a one-off manner, it’s essential to pump and dump for 24 hours. It’s also necessary to find someone else able to care for and bottle feed your baby while you’re under the influence of drugs.

Do I need to pump and dump after one glass of wine?

No. If you have one alcoholic drink and wait four hours to feed your baby, you won’t need to pump and dump. And if engorgement and milk supply are not an issue, you can just wait for the liquor to metabolize naturally. Alcohol doesn’t stay in breast milk, and pumping and dumping doesn’t eliminate it from your system.

Can wine make babies fussy?

But not to worry. They are minor and unlikely to have any long-term impact on your baby. The only way they would potentially cause problems is if you were to drink heavily throughout the day. The amount of alcohol that passes into breast milk is miniscule, less than a tenth of a percent of what you drink.

Does wine decrease milk supply?

Even though nursing right after a couple of drinks can temporarily decrease the baby’s milk intake, a beer or a glass of wine a couple of times a week is unlikely to matter, and the effects decrease as your baby gets older.

How much is 5 fluid ounces wine?

When serving wine, the standard amount you typically pour in a glass is 5 ounces or roughly 147 ml. So, a single bottle will contain 5 glasses of wine. However, this number will vary depending on the type of wine and its alcohol level (alcohol by volume or ABV).

How many units is a bottle of wine?

A 750ml bottle of red, white or rosé wine (ABV 13.5%) contains 10 units. See the guide below to find out how many units are in your favourite tipple.

How do you breastfeed and drink alcohol?

Limit your alcohol intake to 1 to 2 drinks per day or less when nursing. Drink alcohol with food and water to help lower blood alcohol levels (and human milk alcohol levels). After drinking, wait for 2 hours (per drink) to nurse your baby. Make sure to never co-sleep with your baby if you have consumed any alcohol.

Alcohol and Breastfeeding

The most safest choice for nursing women is to abstain from alcoholic beverages. On the other hand, modest alcohol usage (up to one drink per day) is not known to be hazardous to the developing newborn.

What is “moderate consumption”?

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, moderate intake for women of legal drinking age is defined as up to one standard drink per day for women of legal drinking age.

What is a “drink”?

To be considered a normal “drink,” according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans external emblem, 12 ounces of 5 percent beer, 8 ounces of 7 percent malt liquor, 5 ounces of 12 percent wine, or 1.5 ounces of 40 percent (80 proof) liquor are sufficient. All of these beverages contain the same quantity of pure alcohol (i.e., 14 grams, or 0.6 ounces) as each other. However, many popular beverages contain far more alcohol than this. To give an example, 12 ounces of 9 percent beer has almost the same quantity of alcohol as two normal drinks (1.8 ounces each).

Is it safe for mothers to breastfeed their infant if they have consumed alcohol?

The most safest choice for nursing women is to abstain from alcoholic beverages. It is generally accepted that modest alcohol use by a breastfeeding mother (up to 1 standard drink per day) is not detrimental to the newborn, particularly if the mother waits at least 2 hours after a single drink before nursing. In contrast, prolonged exposure to alcohol at levels greater than moderate levels through breast milk may be detrimental to an infant’s development, growth, and sleep habits. A mother’s judgment and ability to provide safe care for her kid may be impaired if she consumes alcohol in excess of modest amounts.

Can alcohol be found in breast milk?

Yes. Alcohol concentrations in breast milk are typically greatest 30-60 minutes after an alcoholic beverage is taken, and may normally be identified in breast milk for around 2-3 hours per drink after the beverage has been consumed. The length of time that alcohol may be identified in breast milk, on the other hand, increases in direct proportion to the amount of alcohol consumed by the mother. If a woman consumes one drink, alcohol can be found in her breast milk for approximately 2-3 hours, if she consumes two drinks, alcohol can be detected for approximately 4-5 hours, and if she consumes three drinks, alcohol can be detected for approximately 6-8 hours, and so on.

What effect does alcohol have on a breastfeeding infant?

Yes. Alcohol levels in breast milk are typically greatest 30-60 minutes after consumption of an alcoholic beverage, and may be found in breast milk for around 2-3 hours per drink taken after consumption. When a mother consumes a lot of alcohol, the length of time that alcohol can be detected in her breast milk will lengthen. If a woman consumes one drink, alcohol can be found in her breast milk for approximately 2-3 hours, if she consumes two drinks, alcohol can be detected for approximately 4-5 hours, and if she consumes three drinks, alcohol can be detected for approximately 6-8 hours, and so on.

Alcohol and Caregivers

It is not safe to care for a newborn while under the influence of alcohol. Drinking alcohol may affect a caregiver’s decision-making abilities as well as his or her capacity to provide safe care for a baby. If a caregiver consumes excessive amounts of alcoholic beverages, he or she should make arrangements for a sober adult to care for the newborn during this period.

Can expressing/pumping breast milk after consuming alcohol reduce the alcohol in the mother’s milk?

While inebriated, it is not safe to care for a young child. A caregiver’s ability to make decisions and provide safe care for a newborn may be impaired if he or she consumes alcohol. If a caregiver consumes excessive amounts of alcohol, he or she should make arrangements for an adult who is not intoxicated to care for the newborn during this time period.

Breastfeeding and alcohol: Is it OK to drink?

Elizabeth LaFleur, R.N., Provides an Answer Breastfeeding and alcohol don’t go together like peanut butter and jelly. In terms of alcohol content, there is no acceptable level of alcohol in breast milk for a newborn to consume. The alcohol you consume goes into your breast milk at quantities that are comparable to those present in your bloodstream. Despite the fact that a breastfed infant is exposed to only a fraction of the amount of alcohol consumed by his or her mother, a newborn removes alcohol from his or her body at a rate that is half that of an adult.

  1. In addition, contrary to popular belief, drinking alcohol does not increase milk production.
  2. If you choose to consume alcoholic beverages, refrain from nursing until the alcohol has entirely cleared your breast milk.
  3. In the event that you choose to consume alcohol, consider taking a drink immediately after nursing so that the alcohol can begin to clear your breast milk during the natural period between breastfeeding sessions.
  4. Pumping and dumping, on the other hand, will help you preserve your milk supply and minimize engorgement if you are unable to breastfeed due to a scheduling conflict.
  5. If you decide to drink, make sure to prepare ahead of time to prevent exposing your child to alcohol.

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  1. Breastfeeding and mother alcohol use: Prevalence and consequences on child outcomes and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, May PA, et al. (2016). Reproductive Toxicology, Volume 63, Number 13. Breastfeeding and alcoholic beverages are prohibited. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is an acronym that stands for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. accessed on the 20th of June, 2019
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  3. Koren G. is a writer and editor based in New York City. Is it safe to drink alcohol while breastfeeding? Will it harm my child? Canadian Family Physician, vol. 48, no. 39, 2002. Mennella, J., et al., The effects of alcohol on lactation. Research on Alcoholic Beverages and Health, 2001
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  14. 3rd edition of Bantam Books’ New Mother’s Guide to Breastfeeding (New York, NY: Bantam Books).
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Can I Drink Wine While Breastfeeding?

Photo illustration by Ellen Linder / Unsplash courtesy of Verywell It is possible that you are looking forward to the day when you will be able to enjoy a glass of red wine with your dinner after abstaining from alcohol for nine months of pregnancy. However, if you are breast-feeding, you may be asking whether it is safe to consume alcohol. It is often OK to consume a little amount of wine while nursing despite the fact that refraining from alcohol is always the safest course of action. Because alcohol does pass into breastmilk, it is important to monitor your intake as well as your drinking habits while pregnant.

“Just like many other substances,” she adds.

Drinking Wine While Breastfeeding

While nursing, you can have up to one glass of wine every day without risking your health. There are no known dangers to a breastfeeding child linked with this quantity of alcohol use, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests waiting at least two hours before breastfeeding your infant after consuming wine. This permits your body to begin the process of metabolizing the alcohol. As Ellison points out, “you can opt to drink shortly after nursing or pumping so that by the time your baby is ready to eat again, the alcohol will be mainly gone from your system and breastmilk,” which will reduce the exposure of your kid to alcohol.

If you have any questions regarding consuming wine while nursing, you should speak with your healthcare professional about your specific situation.

Is It Safe for Baby?

Due to the fact that alcohol can pass through breastmilk, it is recommended that you limit your alcohol consumption to one glass per day. Large amounts of alcohol can have an adverse effect on your baby’s sleep and development. Drinking large amounts of alcohol can also have an adverse effect on your ability to breastfeed your child. Consuming more than one drink per day, due to the effect it has on the letdown reflex, can have an adverse effect on milk production and may result in unintended early weaning.

Why You Should Limit Wine While Breastfeeding

Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol while breastfeeding can be detrimental to your baby’s health as well as your breastfeeding experience. When you drink, it is critical that you limit yourself to one drink per day. It is also beneficial to try to leave at least two hours between when you drink and when you have your next nursing session. As previously stated, consuming more than one alcoholic beverage per day may have an adverse effect on your baby’s sleep and development.

It can also cause milk production to be disrupted, which can result in unintentional early weaning. Finally, being under the influence of alcohol might impair your capacity to properly care for a newborn.

Does the “Pump and Dump” Method Actually Work?

Even if you consume more than one drink, you may have heard that the “pump and dump” method, which involves pumping your breastmilk immediately after drinking and then throwing it away, is effective at removing the alcohol from your breastmilk. This isn’t correct at all. “Pumping and dumping have no effect on the elimination of alcohol from the body,” states Kim Langdon, MD, an obstetrician and gynecologist with more than 19 years of clinical expertise. As an alternative, it is recommended that you wait two hours after each drink before feeding your infant.

Safety Precautions

While nursing, there are no benefits to consuming alcoholic beverages; therefore, refraining is always the safest course of action. If you do decide to drink wine while breastfeeding, there are a few crucial safety considerations you should be aware of before you start.

Baby Sleep

Drinking too much wine might have a negative influence on the sleep of your breastfeeding child. Babies who were breastfed by their moms who had consumed alcohol before the feeding were found to sleep less and wake up more frequently according to one research. “When compared to an adult, a baby’s alcohol metabolism and elimination are 50 percent slower,” Dr. Langdon explains. “Changes in sleep patterns are observed in infants who consume more than one drink each day.”

Developmental Issues

There is some evidence that newborns’ gross motor development is negatively affected by frequent exposure to alcohol through breastfeeding. If a nursing parent consumes excessive amounts of alcohol before breastfeeding their children, this may have an influence on their reasoning abilities later childhood.

Inebriation

When you have consumed excessive amounts of alcohol, it might be dangerous to hold and care for your newborn. Pay attention to your body when it comes to determining the precise amount of alcohol you can consume. It is possible that even one glass of wine will make you feel a bit wobbly if you have been abstaining from alcohol for nine months or more during your pregnancy. In the event that you find yourself a touch tipsy, ask whether your partner or another uninhibited adult can lend a hand, advises Ellison.

Reduced Milk Supply

Consumption of excessive amounts of alcoholic beverages might have a negative impact on your milk production. Even though you may have heard that brewer’s yeast in beer might enhance milk production, excessive alcohol consumption can actually reduce milk production. In the words of Ellison, “there are alternative, more efficient strategies to enhance your supply, including as nursing or pumping more frequently, as well as proper milk removal.” It has been demonstrated in studies that breastfed newborns take less milk each nursing session when their breastfeeding parent has consumed alcoholic beverages.

In addition, Dr. Landon points out that when there is alcohol in the milk, babies consume 20 percent less of it.

A Word From Verywell

Even though abstaining from alcoholic beverages is the safest option when breastfeeding, one glass of wine per day has not been demonstrated to have any detrimental effects on a nursing child. While breastfeeding, limit yourself to one glass of wine per day, and allow at least two hours between your last drink and your next nursing session if you want to do so. Drinking excessive amounts of wine may cause you to get drunk, which may impair your ability to provide safe care for your newborn. Despite the fact that one glass of wine is acceptable when nursing, pay close attention to how your body reacts to the alcohol.

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Alcohol and breastfeeding: What are the risks?

Providing accurate information to lactating mothers about the effects of alcohol consumption is critical, despite the fact that the available data in this area is limited. The dangers of alcohol use during pregnancy have long been documented in the scientific literature. 1 Much less is known, however, concerning the long-term effects of alcohol use on nursing mothers and their newborn children. When we evaluate a patient’s medical history in the clinic, we routinely inquire about a woman’s use of cigarettes, alcohol, and other drugs, and we educate women about the potentially harmful effects of these substances when used during pregnancy.

  1. Several health care specialists recommend that nursing women abstain from alcohol use, while others believe that breastfeeding women are not at danger from alcohol intake.
  2. 3 Despite the fact that nursing women were less likely to report binge drinking, epidemiological studies have revealed that patterns of drinking at 1 and 3 months after giving birth did not differ substantially between women who decided to breastfeed and those who did not.
  3. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of alcohol in the mother and newborn A nursing infant’s intake of alcohol through breast milk is estimated to be between 5 and 6 percent of the weight-adjusted maternal dosage.
  4. The presence of alcohol in breast milk is commonly found for around 2 to 3 hours after a single drink has been ingested.
  5. After one drink, alcohol may be identified in breast milk for around 2 to 3 hours; however, if a woman has two drinks, the duration increases to approximately 4 to 5 hours; if she consumes three drinks, the period increases to approximately 6 to 8 hours; and so on.
  6. 4,5The amount of alcohol present in breast milk and the ability of the nursing infant to metabolize alcohol are both factors that influence the amount of alcohol present in a nursing infant’s blood.
  7. 3,6Alcohol and the production of milk When it comes to breastfeeding, some women are advised to consume alcohol in order to increase breast milk production, while others are taught that the minerals included in dark stout beers such as Guinness are beneficial to the baby’s nutrition.

There is a grain of truth to these advice, just as there is to many other old wives’ stories.

7 Alcohol, on the other hand, has been shown to actually reduce milk production.

Because of this effect, it was first used in clinical practice in the 1970s to control contractions and avoid premature delivery in pregnant women.

However, one research found that ingesting as little as 0.3 g of alcohol per kg of body weight (which is less than the level recommended appropriate by the American Academy of Pediatrics) had a negative effect on milk supply, resulting in a 10% reduction in milk output.

7However, according to a second study, if women did not drink any more alcohol, their babies nursed more frequently and absorbed bigger volumes of milk in the 8 to 12 hours after maternal alcohol intake.

In fact, when infants were given alcohol-enriched milk in a bottle instead of plain breast milk, Mennella discovered that they consumed significantly more of the alcohol-enriched milk.

7,13,14 While two studies found that the total amount of sleep remained unchanged after consuming alcohol-containing milk, these studies also found that the sleep was more fragmented as a result of the consumption.

14 Effects of alcohol on a breastfeeding infant over the long term The long-term effects of alcohol supplied through mother’s milk on newborns have been explored less thoroughly, with only a small number of research looking at neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants who had been exposed to alcohol.

  1. Apart from the direct effects of alcohol exposure through breast milk, it is also conceivable that alcohol taken by the mother may have an impact on a growing kid through affecting the mother’s behavior or her ability to raise the child.
  2. 15 The Bayley Mental Development Index (MDI), which measures cognitive development, found that mother alcohol use had no effect on the child’s cognitive development.
  3. A negative dose-response association was found between the frequency of mother alcohol intake and the scores on the PDI, according to the findings of the study.
  4. This link remained even after researchers took into account more than 100 possible confounding variables, such as smoking and the use of other substances.
  5. There was no correlation between scores on the Griffiths Developmental Scales and alcohol exposure in a comparable research conducted by the same group in a sample of 18-month-old children, according to the findings of that study.
  6. Consequently, they believe that research of older children may be more useful in determining the consequences of drinking while breastfeeding.
  7. Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children is a longitudinal study of Australian children that began in 2004 and continues to this day.

Increased mother alcohol intake at the time of the initial evaluation was related with dose-dependent impairments in abstract reasoning in children who had been nursed by the time they were 6 to 7 years old.

This finding was independent of prenatal alcohol use, the gender of the child, the mother’s age, her income, the weight of the child at birth, and the length of time the child was breastfed.

Implications for clinical practice There are many various patterns of alcohol use, and it would be incorrect to assume that taking an occasional drink poses the same danger as chronic, heavy, or binge drinking.

All pregnant and postpartum women should be asked about their alcohol consumption, both in the past and in the present.

Despite the fact that many women with alcohol use disorders are able to refrain from drinking during pregnancy, the likelihood of recurrence after birth is quite high.

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All women should be provided with information about the use of alcohol while breastfeeding when they are close to giving birth.

Aside from that, the most recent research have indicated that alcohol carried through breast milk may have detrimental neurodevelopmental consequences on children.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ most recent breastfeeding recommendations, 2″the consumption of alcoholic beverages should be minimized and limited to an occasional intake of no more than 0.5 g alcohol per kg body weight, which for a 60 kg mother is approximately 2 oz liquor, 8 oz wine, or 2 beers.” It is also recommended by the researchers that mothers refrain from nursing their infants for 2 hours after their last drink in order to allow the alcohol to be cleared from the breast milk.

A more conservative approach has been taken by the Motherisk program in Toronto (Canada), which has released the following statement: “At this time, there are no recognized advantages of introducing nursing infants to alcohol.” Although there has been no evidence of overt harm to babies as a result of occasional drinking while breastfeeding, the chance of detrimental consequences cannot be ruled out completely.

The occasional drink, on the other hand, does not necessitate the cessation of nursing, because the benefits of breastfeeding are many and widely acknowledged.

For this reason, it is recommended that women delay nursing their children until all traces of alcohol have been eliminated from their breast milk.” A nomogram designed to help mothers who choose to drink alcohol while breastfeeding estimate the amount of time it will take for alcohol to be cleared from breast milk, taking into account their body weight and the number of drinks they consume, has been developed by Motherisk to help minimize exposure (Table 1).

There is still a scarcity of information on the long-term effects of exposure to alcohol when nursing a child.

As a result, in order to reduce the risk of adverse events in nursing children, it is advisable to advise mothers on the importance of following the advice of healthcare authorities against alcohol use in nursing women.

Disclosures:

There are no possible conflicts of interest reported by the author in relation to this paper.

References:

  • With reference to this paper, the author declares that he has no possible conflicts of interest.
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  • Should breast-feeding women drink Guinness? Bryce E. Should breast-feeding women drink Guinness? LiveScience. It was accessed on the 8th of September, 2018.
  • Acute alcohol intake affects the hormonal milieu of nursing mothers, according to Mennella JA, Pepino MY, and Teff KL. In 2005, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM) published a paper titled
  • The short-term effects of mother alcohol intake on lactational performance have been studied by Mennella et al. Alcohol Clin Exp Res, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1389-1392, 1998.
  • Lactational performance and short-term consequences of mother alcohol consumption: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 1489–1392 in Alcohol Clin Exp Res, vol. 22 no. 7 (1998).
  • Suckling reactions of infants to the taste of alcoholic beverages in their mothers’ breast milk, Mennella, JA. Alcohol Clin Exp Res, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 581-585, 1997.
  • Suckling reactions of infants to the taste of alcoholic beverages in their mothers’ breast milk, Mennella, JA (in press). 581-585 in Alcohol Clin Exp Res (1997), a peer-reviewed journal.
  • Women’s Health Journal (Jan. 2007). Mennella JA, Gerrish CJ. The effects of exposure to alcohol in mother’s milk on newborn sleep. Pediatrics, vol. 101, no. 5, p. E2 (1998).
  • A review of the literature by Little, Anderson, Ervin, Worthington-Roberts, and Clarren SK. The relationship between maternal alcohol use while breast-feeding and newborn mental and motor development at one year. N The New England Journal of Medicine 321(7):425-430 in 1989.
  • Little, R.E., Northstone, K., Golding, J., and the ALSPAC Research Team. At 18 months, the effects of alcohol, nursing, and development are examined. Pediatrics, vol. 109, no. 5, pp. E72-72, 2002.
  • The effects of drinking or smoking while nursing on a child’s later cognition have been studied by Gibson and Porter (2018) in Pediatrics (142(2)).
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Wine and Breastfeeding: What You Need to Know

You’ve been abstaining from alcoholic beverages for nine months, and you’re now wondering if it’s okay to unwind with a glass of wine at the end of a long day. You, on the other hand, are nursing. You’ll go to great lengths to ensure the safety and health of your newest family member, and you don’t want to take any chances. If you keep a few things in mind, drinking wine after your baby has made their triumphant entrance into the world — even while breastfeeding — is perfectly acceptable. Here’s all you need to know about the situation.

  • Salud!
  • Enjoy your wine, knowing that it is perfectly acceptable to consume in moderation while nursing.
  • The quick answer is that one drink per day is OK.
  • Considering that it takes your body between one and three hours to metabolize (read: use up) the alcohol in your blood, it is recommended that you nurse your infant before drinking and then wait at least two hours before snuggling up and breastfeeding again.
  • Keep in mind that the more you drink, the longer the amount of alcohol will remain in your blood and breast milk after you stop drinking.
  • Alcohol from a single drink remains in your breast milk for around 2 to 3 hours; alcohol from 2 drinks remains in your breast milk for approximately 4 to 5 hours; and alcohol from 3 drinks remains in your breast milk for approximately 6 to 8 hours.
  • Stick to one drink no more than 2 hours before nursing, and both you and your child will be OK, I promise.

In the case of wine, a drink is around 5 fluid ounces.

When it comes to alcohol like vodka, you’re only allowed 1.5 fluid ounces.

Nonetheless, double-check your drink before you consume it: A 12-ounce glass of 9 percent beer has nearly double the quantity of pure alcohol found in a conventional 5-ounce glass of 5 percent beer.

Depending on your baby’s age, the amount of alcohol present in your breast milk will be metabolized more quickly by him or her.

Alcohol intake by nursing infants through breast milk is estimated to be 5 to 6 percent of the weight-adjusted mother dosage, depending on the source of the breast milk.

You may want to be cautious about increasing your alcohol consumption while you have permission to do so on an infrequent basis. Here’s what the study says regarding increasing your alcohol consumption and having alcohol transfer into your breast milk:

  • Following a nine-month abstinence from alcohol, you’re thinking if it’s okay to unwind with a glass of wine at the end of a long workday. You, on the other hand, are nursing your baby. You’ll go to great lengths to ensure the safety and health of your newest family member, and you don’t want to take any chances with their wellbeing. The good news is that, as long as you keep a few things in mind, drinking wine after your kid has made its triumphant entry into the world — even if you’re nursing — is entirely OK. You should be aware of the following information: Cheers! Salud! Cin cin, my friends! It is safe to consume wine in moderation when nursing, therefore take advantage of this opportunity! “Moderation,” however, is not defined clearly. Briefly said, one drink each day is OK. Before you raise your glass, though, there are a few more things you should know. When you drink alcohol, it flows into your breast milk in a similar manner to how it passes into your circulation, and what’s in your blood is in your milk. Considering that it takes your body between one and three hours to digest (read: use up) the alcohol in your blood, it is best practice to breastfeed your infant before drinking and then wait at least two hours before snuggling up and breastfeeding again. For example, if you’ve whet your hunger and want to have another drink or two, you might do so. Please keep in mind that the more alcoholic beverages you consume, the longer the presence of alcohol will be in your blood and milk. Calculate the outcome first. Drinking alcohol for a single drink will remain in your breast milk for around 2 to 3 hours
  • Drinking alcohol for two drinks will remain in your breast milk for approximately 4 to 5 hours
  • And drinking alcohol for three drinks will remain in your breast milk for approximately 6 to 8 hours. This might result in you not being able to count accurately after that point. Stick to one drink no more than 2 hours before nursing, and both you and your child will be fine, I promise you! How much you drink will depend on what you’re ingesting. A sip of wine is approximately 5 fluid ounces in volume. The recommended serving size for beer is 12 fluid ounces if you choose a regular, everyday beer (with around 5 percent alcohol by volume). It just takes 1.5 fluid ounces of vodka or other distilled alcohol to make a cocktail. There are 0.6 ounces of pure alcohol in each of these beverages. Still, before you gulp your drink, double-check that it contains: When compared to a regular 5 percent beer, 12 fluid ounces of 9 percent beer contains nearly double the quantity of pure ethanol. Isn’t that right? It is likely that the older your baby is, the more quickly he or she will metabolize any alcohol that may be in your breast milk. You should be mindful of the fact that babies digest alcohol at a pace roughly equal to that of an adult. Alcohol intake by nursing infants through breast milk is estimated to be 5 to 6 percent of the weight-adjusted mother dosage, depending on the source of the alcohol intake. You may wish to refrain from drinking excessively while you have permission to indulge in an occasional drink. In terms of drinking more and having alcohol flow into your milk, here’s what the study has discovered:

Nope! The quantity of alcohol present in your milk corresponds to the amount of alcohol present in your blood. Pumping and dumping will not help you in this situation. Your incredible body works in unison to do the following: Alcohol levels in your blood fall as a result of this, and the levels of alcohol in your milk fall as well.

A matter of size

Keep in mind that you should limit your alcohol consumption in accordance with your body weight. People who are underweight will require more time to metabolize alcohol than those who are overweight.

The truth about beer

Is it true that alcohol increases your milk supply? It is dependent on the situation. When it comes to beer, while barley contains a polysaccharide that increases prolactin (and thus milk production), alcohol has the opposite effect, decreasing milk production. Therefore, if you want to indulge in more than one beer, drink responsibly and choose nonalcoholic beer. If your infant is refusing to breastfeed after having a glass of beer, this is because beer has a taste that may be detected in your milk.

Slower reaction time

Alcohol will slow your reaction time and may impair your ability to provide proper care for your child while under the influence of alcohol. The risk of having an occasional drink is not the same as the risk of heavy drinking. To conclude, cheers and relax with a glass of wine every now and then. You’re doing an outstanding job.

Alcohol and breastfeeding

Breastfeeding women may hear inconsistent information regarding whether or not consuming alcohol might have a detrimental impact on their child when they are breastfeeding. Because of this, people may feel as though they have more questions than they do answers. As a result of the evidence that drinking alcohol during pregnancy can cause harm to an unborn child, women are frequently advised not to drink while nursing. However, the dangers of drinking alcohol during breastfeeding are not as clearly defined.

  • The quantity of alcohol consumed by the mother has a direct impact on the amount of milk produced by the infant.
  • A large number of moms, on the other hand, find themselves in circumstances where they desire to drink but are concerned about the implications it could have on their child.
  • Is it possible for alcohol to have an impact on milk production?
  • Alcohol abuse has an impact on the baby.
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Things to consider

What is the age of your child?

  • Age of your child

Your body mass index (BMI)

  • The size of a person has an effect on how rapidly they metabolize alcohol. Compared to a lighter individual, a bigger person has a faster rate of alcohol metabolism.

The amount of alcohol consumed

  • There is a direct relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the effect that it has on the baby. The greater the amount of alcohol drank, the longer it takes for the mother’s body to be cleared

Will you be having something to eat?

  • When an alcoholic beverage is ingested with food, the rate of absorption into the bloodstream is slowed.

How much alcohol passes into breastmilk?

Alcohol is present in a woman’s milk at the same concentration as it is in her blood: it increases and falls with the milk’s temperature. If you know what your blood alcohol level is, you can figure out what your milk alcohol level is as well. Drinking alcohol with meals has been shown to increase the amount of alcohol in breastmilk, with a peak occurring 30 to 60 minutes after intake and a peak lasting 60 to 90 minutes. Breastmilk also has a high concentration of alcohol, which means that it is seldom necessary to express milk and discard it.

When a 140-pound (10-stone, or 63.5kg) woman consumes one serving of beer or wine, it takes her around two to three hours to clear the alcohol from her system; the more alcohol she consumes, the longer it takes for it to be eliminated.

One must wait until the mother’s blood alcohol level reaches 300 mg/100ml before any serious negative effects in the newborn are recorded. (An 80mg/100ml concentration fails the police breath test.)

Can alcohol affect milk supply?

Babies nurse more frequently when their mothers have consumed alcoholic beverages, according to some research. Adults’ alcohol metabolism is significantly slower than that of children’s, and when there is alcohol in the milk, children appear to consume less milk than they would otherwise in the 3-4 hours following the consumption of an alcoholic beverage (Figure 1). When mothers refrain from drinking during the first 8-16 hours after exposure, it has been observed that their milk intake increases as a result of this.

Nursing your infant immediately after a couple of drinks may cause a temporary drop in milk intake, but a beer or a glass of wine once or twice a week is unlikely to have an impact, and the effects diminish as your baby grows older.

Do I have to pump and dump after drinking alcohol?

Babies breastfeed more often when their mothers have eaten alcoholic beverages, according to certain research findings. Adults’ alcohol metabolism is far slower than that of children’s, and when there is alcohol in the milk, children appear to eat less milk than they would normally in the 3-4 hours after the consumption of an alcoholic beverage. When women abstain from drinking for 8-16 hours following exposure, it has been discovered that their milk consumption rises as a result of this. (2,3,4,5) A woman’s milk supply and baby’s growth can be jeopardized if she consumes large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis, especially when combined with the slowed milk release caused by alcohol, which is an oxytocin inhibitor.

Alcohol abuse affects the baby

If you consume large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis, this could be harmful to your child. If you have any concerns regarding the compatibility of your drinking habits with nursing, it might be a good idea for you to contact with a medical practitioner. Drinking to drunkenness or binge drinking while nursing may cause nursing moms to become less conscious of their baby’s demands, and they should avoid breastfeeding until they are entirely sober, at which point the majority of alcohol will have been eliminated from their system.

(6) Mothers who have consumed alcoholic beverages should avoid sharing a bed with their children since their natural reflexes will be impaired.

Alcohol addiction can have a negative impact on milk letdown, which can lead to insufficient breastfeeding.

The infant may sleep more and miss breastfeeds, or he or she may not be able to suck efficiently, resulting in lower milk intake, among other things. It is possible that the newborn will experience delayed motor development.

Medical opinion

Breastfeeding experts Dr. Jack Newman MD FRCPC and Thomas W. Hale PhD feel that a mother can consume a little amount of alcohol while continuing to breastfeed as she would normally do. More Breastfeeding Myths, according to Dr. Jack Newman’s handout, states that “reasonable alcohol use should not be discouraged at any time. As is the case with most medicines, just a little amount of alcohol is excreted in the milk. The woman can have a little amount of alcoholic beverages while continuing to nurse as she normally would.

  1. Hale, R.Ph., Ph.D., in his bookMedications and Mothers’ Milk(18th ed.
  2. This does not necessarily imply that the amount of alcohol in milk is large; rather, it indicates that the levels of alcohol in plasma are consistent with those seen in milk.
  3. Older research, some of which were conducted on animals, showed that beer (or, more likely, barley) may have the ability to increase prolactin levels.
  4. As a result, beer should not be regarded as a galactagogue.
  5. Before any serious negative effects in the newborn are observed, the mother’s blood alcohol levels must reach 300 mg/dl or higher.
  6. (7) Other research has shown that babies of moderate drinkers (2+ drinks daily) may experience psychomotor delay.
  7. Heavy drinkers should be prepared to wait longer.
  8. A decent rule of thumb is to wait 2 hours after each drink drank.

Summary

There is no evidence that the quantity of alcohol consumed by a nursing mother is detrimental when she drinks only infrequently and restricts her consumption to one drink. Generally speaking, the absolute quantity of alcohol transported into breast milk is modest, and while we are always reviewing data, existing studies show that occasional moderate drinking is not considered detrimental to nursing mothers and their children. In the event that you want to drink but are concerned about the impact on your baby, you could store expressed breastmilk to use when the occasion arises.

  1. It is possible to hand express or pump your breast milk during the waiting period, discarding the milk that has been expressed.
  2. If consuming alcohol while breastfeeding is something that you are concerned about, you may prefer to indulge in non-alcoholic beverages instead of alcohol.
  3. Women who believe their options will be limited, particularly if they believe they would be breaking the law if they take an occasional drink while breastfeeding, may be less likely to breastfeed, depriving themselves and their babies of the numerous benefits that breastfeeding may provide.
  4. Continuing Your Education Sleeping better at night and having a breastfed baby are two benefits of breastfeeding.
  5. Various other resources Medicine and Mother’s Milk, by Dr.
  6. Dr.
  7. More Myths About Breastfeeding Breastfeeding with alcoholic beverages are not recommended by the National Health Service.

B., Pottegrd, A., and Damkier, P.

Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol, vol.

168–173 (in English).

Koren, G.

Motherisk Update, Canadian Family Physician, vol.

3, pp.

Mennella, J.A., and Beauchamp, G.K.

A study on the transmission of alcohol to human milk and its effects on the flavor and behavior of the newborn The New England Journal of Medicine published a 325-page article on 981-985 in 1991.

Beer, breast-feeding, and folklore are all topics covered.

26, no.

459-466, 1993.

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol.

5, pp.

JA Mennella, The transfer of alcohol to human milk: Sensory implications and effects on mother-infant interaction, Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, 2005, vol.

), The Encyclopedia of the Humanities.

New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1999.

New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1999.

Transfer of drugs and other chemicals into human milk is referred to as drug transfer.

Pediatrics, Volume 108, Issue 3. The effect of different ethanol doses on the milk-ejecting reflex in lactating women was studied by Cobo et al. 1973; 115(6):817-821 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. LLLGB 2020 retains ownership of the copyright.

Alcohol and breastfeeding

If you don’t take precautions, it could happen. The same quantity of alcohol that makes its way into your circulation also makes its way into your milk supply. While the quantity of alcohol that is transported when you drink a glass of wine is minimal, your baby is small and has an undeveloped liver, so the amount that is transferred is significant. That suggests she isn’t able to digest alcohol as efficiently as you are. Infants younger than 3 months of age metabolize alcohol at a rate that is approximately half that of adults.

  1. Babies who nurse ingest around 20% less milk during the four hours following the consumption of an alcoholic beverage by a lactating mother, such as 4 ounces of wine, one mixed drink, or one can of beer in one sitting.
  2. Alcohol in breast milk may also have a negative impact on a baby’s development.
  3. The findings of this study, on the other hand, have not been replicated.
  4. Some doctors advise nursing mothers to refrain from consuming alcoholic beverages until their child is three months old.

How can I safely have an occasional drink if I’m breastfeeding?

In the absence of protection, it may happen. Breast milk has the same quantity of alcohol as that which is absorbed into the circulation. While the amount of alcohol that is transferred when you drink a glass of wine is small, your baby is small and has an immature liver, so the amount that is transferred is considerable. That a result, she isn’t able to digest alcohol at the same rate as you are. Infants fewer than three months of age metabolize alcohol at a rate that is approximately half that of adults older than three months.

  • Babies that nurse ingest around 20% less milk during the four hours following the consumption of an alcoholic beverage by a nursing mother, such as 4 ounces of wine, one mixed drink, or one can of beer.
  • Baby development may be hampered by the presence of alcohol in breast milk.
  • This was a ground-breaking finding.
  • While no one knows for certain what impact alcohol has on breastfed children, it’s probably best to avoid it altogether – at least in the first stages of the relationship.

Nursing mothers should avoid consuming alcoholic beverages until their child is three months old, according to some specialists. You should consult with your doctor if you believe you are drinking excessively.

Can I have more than one drink if I’m breastfeeding?

When you’re a breastfeeding mother, it’s more difficult to consume more than one drink without becoming ill. The more alcoholic beverages you consume, the longer it will take for the alcohol to leave your system. It will take seven and a half hours for a 120-pound woman of average height and weight to have three drinks in one hour, according to experts who have documented the elimination of alcohol from breast milk. It would take around six hours for a 175-pound lady of average height and weight.

  1. It would take around eight hours for a lady weighing 175 pounds.
  2. If you’re 130 pounds, it implies you can’t drink more than 2 ounces of whiskey, 8 ounces of wine, or two beers in a 24-hour period.
  3. If you have to pump, discard the milk that has been expressed.
  4. However, for a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with breastfeeding, this may not be a wise decision:
  • If you are inebriated, you cannot provide safe care for your child. If you’re under the influence of alcohol or other drugs, you shouldn’t try to co-sleep with your kid. These intoxicants may cause you to lose consciousness of your baby’s existence as well as the sounds of your baby’s screams. To avoid this, avoid sleeping with your kid if you do drink.

Will drinking beer increase my breast milk supply?

No. Despite widespread belief, there is no scientific evidence to support the notion that consuming beer — or any other sort of alcohol – increases your milk production. Because alcohol dehydrates your body and causes you to lose bodily fluid, it can have a detrimental influence on how much milk you produce, for starters. Additionally, consuming alcohol has been shown to affect the hormones that are involved in milk production. The effect of alcohol on lactation is being studied by Julie Mennella, a researcher at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia who explains that while prolactin (a hormone that aids in milk production) increases with alcohol consumption, oxytocin (a hormone that is responsible for milk letdown) decreases.

You should visit with a lactation consultant as well as your baby’s healthcare provider if you are concerned about a poor milk supply.

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