Why Did Jesus Turn Water Into Wine? (Question)

“Mary’s role in the conception of Jesus was specifically to bring him into a mortal or earthly state,” Huntsman wrote. “As Eve was the agent whereby mankind was brought into mortality, Mary was the means by which the premortal, spiritual and divine Word became the earthly Jesus.” The water turned into wine/blood.

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  • By the time legalistic Judaism added even more washings, Judaism was a laborious religion. Jesus took this ceremonial cleansing water and made it into wine. Jesus took that which was a pain and made it into a pleasure. Jesus took that which Jews would have found unfit to drink, and He made of it the best wine that has ever passed the lips of man.

Contents

What does the water and wine represent?

The practice of adding water to the wine used for the sacrifice goes back almost to the beginning, and there has always been a strong symbolic meaning given it. The water represents all of humanity, human nature itself, while the wine represents Christ.

Why did God give us wine?

The Bible says very clearly, that God gave wine to “gladden the heart of man (Psalm 104:15).” I love this verse. Although I am more of a craft brew guy myself, I do enjoy a good glass of wine. This verse adds even more flavor to our drink of choice. He gave us this gift because he loves us.

Why does the priest put water into wine?

The practice of mixing water and wine was common in the ancient world. Wines were usually heavier than most modern vintages and to dilute them a bit made them more palatable and less inebriating. Thus the wine used at Mass was mixed with water before the consecration in the usual manner of all wine.

Do they put holy water in wine?

In preparing the sacrament, the priest blesses the water to represent the grace of God bestowed during baptism with water. The holy water is then mixed with red wine, which symbolises the blood of Christ, so as to represent the uniting of man-seeking-God (Baptism) and God-reaching-out-to-man (the Passion).

Is drinking a sin in the Bible?

The Bible does not forbid drinking alcohol, but it does warn against dangers of drinking too much, engaging in immoral behavior, and other consequences of alcohol use. While the Bible recognizes that drinking in moderation can be enjoyable and even safe, it contains passages that advise against heavy drinking.

Why was wine so important in the Bible?

Wine was used in ancient times for various medicinal ends, and the Bible refers to some of these practices. It was likely used as an anesthetic to dull pain, and many interpreters suggest that it was in this capacity that wines were offered to Jesus at his crucifixion.

What does the wine symbolize?

Wine in literature often connotes happiness and friendship. It is also a symbol of transformation, as grapes undergo transformation when they are fermented. Because of its importance in the Near East, wine may also symbolize sustinance and life. White wine can connote purity.

Do Catholics put holy water in wine?

Holy Mass in Catholic Church is a reenactment of the last supper and commemoration of the crucifixion and death of Jesus. Wine is the symbol of life and blood. When water is added to wine priest say a prayer that remind us of piercing Jesus with a spear and came out blood and water from his heart.

Why does the priest cover the chalice?

The pall (palla) is a stiffened square card covered with white linen, usually embroidered with a cross, or some other appropriate symbol. The purpose of the pall is to keep dust and insects from falling into the Eucharistic elements. Embroidery in the centre was not used, lest the chalice become unstable.

Why is a piece of the host in the wine?

The priest breaks the Bread and puts a piece of the host into the chalice to signify the unity of the Body and Blood of the Lord in the work of salvation, namely, of the living and glorious Body of Jesus Christ.

Why do priest wash their hands during Mass?

In the third century there are traces of a custom of washing the hands as a preparation for prayer on the part of all Christians; and from the fourth century onwards it appears to have been usual for the ministers at the Communion Service [liturgy of the Eucharist] ceremonially to wash their hands before the more

What type of wine is sacramental wine?

Composition. The majority of liturgical churches, such as the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church, require that sacramental wine should be pure grape wine.

What do priests say before Communion?

At the start of the Communion rite, the priest calls on the people to pray the most universal of Christian prayers— the Lord’s Prayer (the “Our Father,” or Pater Noster) —whose author, according to the Gospels, was Christ himself. The prayer is said or sung, often while members of the congregation join hands.

Why Did Jesus Turn Water into Wine?

There is just one place where you may find the tale of Jesus changing water into wine at a wedding reception in Cana: the Gospel of John. Why? This could be due to the fact that Matthew, Mark, and Luke were not present at the time of the miracle, but John was. Despite the fact that he does not explicitly identify himself as one of Jesus’ disciples or as having been there at the wedding at Cana in John’s account, we might safely deduce that he was. In a same vein, John’s account of the narrative does not state precisely why Jesus transformed water into wine.

I believe there is a single cause for this, although there are other other factors that might be considered.

Jesus Changes Water into Wine

On the third day, a wedding ceremony was held at Cana, Galilee, according to the Bible. The wedding was attended by Jesus’ mother, as well as Jesus and his followers, who had been invited as well. As soon as the wine was finished, Jesus’ mother informed him, “They don’t have any more wine.” “Woman, what is the point of including me?” Jesus responded in the affirmative. “I have not yet reached my zenith.” His mother instructed the servants to “do whatever he orders you to do.” Six stone water jars, the sort used by the Jews for ritual washing, were arranged nearby, each carrying between twenty and thirty liters of water.

When they finished, he instructed them to “pull some out and deliver it to the banquet’s master.” They did so, and the master of the meal took a sip of the water that had been transformed into wine and declared it to be excellent.

Later, the groom was summoned to a private room where he said, “Everyone puts out the best wine first, followed by a lesser wine after the guests have had too much to drink; but you have kept the best for last.” What Jesus accomplished here at Cana of Galilee was the first of the signs that he used to display his glory, and his followers were convinced of his authority as a result (John 2:1-11).

What John Saw

According to John, it was via this “sign” that Jesus displayed his glory for the first time to the people of the world. Jesus shone with brightness in the eyes of John. Glory is a large word that conjures up images of respect, majesty, and magnificence. These lines allude to the deity of Jesus, who is the subject of this passage. It’s remarkable to note how quietly this miracle occurred while also noting how many divine traits of Jesus may be detected in the process.

We See Honor

According to John, it was via this “sign” that Jesus displayed his glory for the first time to the people of Jerusalem. Jesus shone with radiance in the eyes of the prophet John.

Glory is a large word that conjures up images of respect, majesty, and magnificence in the mind. All of these terms allude to Jesus’ divinity. When you consider how softly this miracle occurred, yet how many divine traits of Jesus can be observed, it’s rather remarkable.

We See Authority

When Jesus transformed water into wine, he revealed his dominion over all things, even down to the molecular level of existence. Some claim that he did not transform water into wine, but rather grape juice. This is completely ludicrous, but merely to make light of such criticism, it requires a miracle for any transition to take place. Water does not change its molecular makeup unless the Creator gives it permission to do so. Dr. Cliff Lewis provides the following explanation: On a molecular level, the water, which is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, was transformed into wine, which comprises sugars, yeast, and water, all of which contain carbon and nitrogen in addition to oxygen and hydrogen, and which is primarily hydrogen and oxygen.

In order to carry out this atomic deconstruction and repair, an enormous amount of energy would be required.

However, because Jesus was the one who caused the wine atoms to recombine, he would have to inject an immense amount of energy into the atoms in order for them to recombine.

And he was able to do that without putting in any effort.

We See Power

The transformation of water into wine necessitates the demonstration of power across time and place. Winemaking entails a number of procedures that take place over an extended period of time. The development of the plant. The process by which a grape reaches maturity. The grapes are being harvested. Using a grape press, press the grapes into juice. The amount of time necessary for fermentation to take place. It takes a long time for great wine to ferment. Only God has the ability to skip the whole timeline in a matter of minutes, as Jesus did.

We See Counterculture

As part of the ritual bathing, Jesus instructed his slaves to replenish the ceremonial washing jars, which had previously been used to wash the body’s outside according to the law, with something from the inside of the body. His counterculture teaching begins with this demonstration, which is only the beginning of his career. Over and over again, he would come to question the practices of religious leaders as well as the beliefs of the general public.

We See Even More Now

The transformation of water into wine heralded the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry. When we look at what Jesus taught following this, we can see that there are many other things we may learn from this incident. Things they weren’t aware of at the time. By delving further into these, we may learn much more:

  • The transformation of water into wine signaled the beginning of Jesus’ public life. Taking a look at what Jesus taught following this, we can see that there are many more lessons we may learn from this incident. Somethings that they were not aware of at the time Deeper examination of the following reveals more:

The Bible says in Hebrews 8:6, “However, the ministry Jesus has received is as superior to theirs as the covenant of which he serves as mediator is superior to the old covenant, because the new covenant is built on better promises than the old.” Perhaps you will notice even more items that need to be investigated.

One Reason Why

The reason Jesus transformed water into wine, as I mentioned at the outset of this post, can be boiled down to one thing. I’m not sure how I know this because Jesus didn’t say anything. This is due to the fact that Jesus said it later in John 5:19, “Very truly I tell you, the Son can do nothing by himself; all that he can accomplish is what he sees his Father doing, since whatever the Father does, the Son likewise does.” I believe that Jesus transformed the water into wine as a result of a directive from his heavenly Father.

He did this because he genuinely cares about us.

She has published several books, includingEmerging With Wings, A Bird Named Payn, Love’s Manifesto, and Because You Matter, and she is the host of theVictorious Souls Podcast.

She lives with her husband in Michigan, close to her adult children and grandkids.

Why Did Jesus Turn Water into Wine?

The first miracle performed by Jesus, the changing of water into wine at the wedding of Cana, is replete with symbolic allusions to the main themes of Scripture. What gives us reason to believe otherwise? Jesus is not the sort to do things on the spur of the moment. As a bonus, according to John the Apostle, this miracle is just one of numerous signs (John 2:11), all of which “are recorded so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that, by believing, you may have life in his name” (20:31).

As evidence of Jesus’ life and activities, we should consider them to be indicators of His divinity and divine plans for the world, rather than as proofs of his divinity and divine intentions for the world.

So they signpost us to the day when sin and disease and sorrow and death will be no more, since Jesus will have made all things new (Rev.

Most of Jesus’ miracles, such as the feeding of the hungry, the healing of the lame, the exorcism of demons, and the resurrection of Lazarus and Jairus’ daughter, are easy to discern from this perspective. But what, exactly, does Christ have to do with Cabernet? In every manner, this is significant.

The Wine That’s Gone Too Soon

Wine is used as a metaphor of God’s grace and the joy that results as a consequence (cf. Deut. 7:1–13; Jer. 31:5–12; Isa. 25:6–9; Joel 3:18) throughout the Scriptures. Wine, on the other hand, is not required for survival. Its excess is a symbol of God’s overabundant grace, which is reflected in it. That is to say, our Lord is the sort of God who delights in bestowing pleasant things on those who do not deserve them, such as “wine to gladden the heart of man,” which is completely unnecessary (Ps.

  • Nonetheless, the most serious difficulty that comes with life under the sun is the ephemeral pleasure that we derive from our idolatrous attempts to enjoy God’s blessings “separate from him” (Eccl.
  • This attitude to life is a fruitless endeavor that will ultimately result in discontent.
  • 1:21–25), which is impossible.
  • It is a gathering that has run out of things to laugh about (John 2:3).
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The New Wine of the New Covenant

Let us welcome Jesus, the Lord of the Feast, the Master of Ceremonies, as well as both the Vine and the Vintner. Notice how He does not follow the ways of this world, diluting God’s blessings as if they were in short supply, as if grace were in short supply. No, our Lord is the one who creates the greatest wine (John 2:10). Take a look at the fortified wine of grace, which is offered to anybody who thirsts, regardless of their financial situation (Isa. 55:1–2). Marvel at Jesus’ supply, as evidenced by the conversion of six full containers containing “twenty to thirty gallons apiece” into a single tank of water (John 2:6).

God has truly prepared a table for us, and the cup that has been placed on it overflowing with blessings (cf.

23:5).

According to most scholars, John’s mentioning of this particular detail is intended to emphasize the redemptive-historical transition from the recurring ceremonial requirements of the old covenant (Exodus 30:17–21) to the once-for-all washing of baptism in the new covenant (Romans 6:3–5; Titus 3:5–6).

Mark 2:22).

As a result, Jesus’ miracle included the miraculous production of wine from rock, demonstrating Christ to be the genuine and superior Moses, whereas Moses just produced water from rock during his miracle (Ex.

17:6; Num. 20:8). Isn’t this pattern consistent with what we’ve previously heard from John about the situation? But although the water of the law was delivered through Moses, the wine of grace was provided through the person of Jesus Christ (John 1:17).

The Joy That Never Ends

Notice when Jesus performs His first miraculous sign: “On the third day, there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee” (On the third day, there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee) (John 2:1). That the miracle occurs during a wedding, one of God’s favorite metaphors for the bond He has established with His people, is no coincidence. Nonetheless, are we justified in interpreting John’s remark of the third day as having any significance? A thorough reading of the entire Bible reveals that neither metaphor nor numerology are required to understand the importance of this particular element.

On the third day, Abraham sees the spot where the Lord supplies (Gen.

19), the third day, the Lord restores His fallen people (Hos.

12:40).

According to these considerations, John’s deliberate mention of the time and place of Jesus’ first miracle may indicate that Christ’s first miracle served as a prelude to the third day of the resurrection (Luke 24:46), and thus as a guarantee of that day when the ultimate wedding of Christ to His bride is consummated with His return (Revelation 21:1–5).

(Revelation 19:9).

26:29).

16:11).

Why did Jesus Turn water into wine?

“Jesus Is the Life of the Party,” was the first and only chapel message I ever heard, and it will remain etched in my memory forever. I used to work as a Bible teacher at a Christian institution when a chapel speaker came to demonstrate how “cool” Jesus was to the students. An image of a stuffy, stern, and boring elderly instructor was used to introduce the chapel sermon. And the speaker’s concern was that “many of you believe Jesus is like this guy,” according to him. The speaker had good intentions.

  • He wanted them to understand that Jesus had a greater vision than just removing one’s hat during prayer time and memorizing the King James Version of the Bible.
  • In this case, the obvious response was no.
  • Not exactly the actions of a killjoy, is it?
  • Unfortunately, his message appeared to indicate that Jesus enjoys getting people a bit tipsy and having a good time—at least, that is what all of my high school students took away from his statement.
  • That was hardly the message a group of underage children needed to hear.
  • How else could you comprehend the personality of a man who appeared out of nowhere and mysteriously created vats of booze for a party?
  • And then I spent the rest of the day undoing all that the chapel speaker had done to me.

Allow me to explain.

He had a very particular point to make, and it wasn’t an invitation to get drunk with Jesus, as some have suggested.

Given that we don’t know why John opted to include Jesus’ miracle of turning water into wine, the miracle of turning water into wine is perplexing, puzzling, and maybe deceptive.

According to John, out of all of Jesus’ wonderful deeds, which he claims might have filled books upon books (see John 21:25), he picked this particular account to have a special impression on the audience of his Gospel.

Based on the data provided by church historians and John’s Gospel, we may conclude that John’s audience was predominantly comprised of Hellenistic Jews and Gentile God-fearers who resided in Asia Minor at the time of his writing (modern-day Western Turkey).

One thing that’s vital for you to realize is that these group of people in Asia Minor grew up strolling past Greek temples and attending festivals dedicated to Greek gods.

In addition, one of the most well-attended celebrations at the start of the year had a direct connection to Jesus’ miraculous wine-making abilities.

Jesus’ Glory was shown via the process of wine-making.

The significance of these words is communicated to us through the tale.

We need to explain that phrase because it is a bit of a catch-all phrase in our culture today.

It represents the God of all things, who sent Jesus to earth, over and over and over again throughout the Bible.

And the transformation of water into wine confirmed it.

At first glance, it may appear that Jesus is reenacting an old miracle that God did for the people of Israel.

That is not how Israel’s God is depicted in any ancient lyric or prophesy as exhibiting his almighty majesty.

In the Greco-Roman culture, people used to tell stories about the process of making wine.

The deity Dionysus is credited with inventing the drink.

Then Dionysus came along and taught humans how to make wine out of those grapes.

People used to drink the same water as their oxen back in the day.

However, instead of finding water in the cup, Icarius discovered the god’s own wine there instead.

A celebration was formed to celebrate the god’s gift to humans, according to tradition, and the production of wine spread from there.

As time went on, the emergence of grapevines and wine became synonymous with the appearance of Dionysus, the god of wine and winemaking.

It is a beautiful piece of poetry.

The presence of the vine meant that the seafarers might rest in the knowing that Dionysus was close by.

It grew famous in other regions of the Greco-Roman world, where the miracle of “one-day vines” was purportedly performed at a number of ancient places associated with Dionysus worship.

By noon, the grapes had already begun to develop, and by nightfall, the dark and heavy fruit could be harvested and used to make a wine or other beverage.

Dionysus’s Miraculous Wine-MakingMiracles indicating the presence of Dionysus became a feature during yearly celebrations as a way of demonstrating the presence of Dionysus The festival of Dionysus was observed at its traditional time at the beginning of every year, according to one Greek writer, Pausanius, It was a wild and rowdy celebration, just the type of thing you’d expect to be associated with a deity who produces copious amounts of wine and signifies the rebirth of the earth’s fertility.

  • Pausanias describes a strange incident that occurred during a New Year’s party in the city of Ellis, which proved that the god’s presence had returned to the earth.
  • Those who wish to close the doors of the building include the priests themselves as well as anyone else who wishes to do so.
  • Although I did not personally appear at the event at the scheduled time, the most respected Elean people, as well as a number of strangers, swore on my behalf that everything I have said is correct.
  • Didorus Siculus and Pliny the Elder, two additional ancient historians, spoke about wine fountains that flowed spontaneously from the earth, as well as spring water from Dionysus’ temple, which had the flavor of wine on festival days, according to their accounts.
  • In his tribe lived the one who brought fertility to the earth, who caused thick clusters of grapes to grow in abundant abundance on vines, and who taught humanity the art of making wine.
  • That is precisely what the people in John’s audience understood when they heard the narrative of Jesus’ miraculous wine-making performance.
  • Once you understand who John’s audience was, the solution is straightforward and obvious.

Although Jesus’ first Jewish audience in Israel would connect the new wine to Old Testament prophecies of God’s saving presence returning to his people (Isaiah 25:6-9; Hosea 14:7; Joel 2:18-27; Amos 9:11-15), John wanted his audience to understand another profound truth: Jesus, not Dionysus, is the true God of the universe.

  • As a matter of fact, Jesus is the source of all good things that arise from the earth.
  • God is here, he said, sending a message to everyone who will pay attention to what he accomplished.
  • Jesus is the true God, and he is the one who has produced all of the benefits that come forth from the earth.
  • Water is a gift from God.
  • John was not attempting to make Jesus’ image more accessible to those who partake in social drinking.
  • The question is, how can we bring the miracle of water to wine back to life in our modern context?
  • The decisions and words he made must be respected, but we must also be innovative in how we recreate his mission in our own time and place.
  • Providing a local supply of clean water in rural places of Africa can have the same impact on the local community as Jesus’ miracle did on the people in John’s audience.
  • In the case of disease-infested water, the creation of a cup of pure water from it might represent Jesus’ loving presence.

You may join the mission of ministries all around the globe that seek to provide wonderful things from the land that God intended for mankind to enjoy in order to get started exhibiting God’s loving presence to those who are in desperate need of it. ​

Bible Background Explainer Video: Water-to-wine Miracle

“Jesus Is the Life of the Party,” was the first and only chapel message I ever heard, and it will stay with me forever. The year was 2000 and I was working as a Bible teacher in an evangelical Christian academy when a chapel speaker came to demonstrate how “cool” Jesus was. An image of a stuffy, stern, and boring elderly instructor opened the chapel message. “Many of you believe Jesus is like this person,” the speaker expressed worry. In his or her heart, the speaker was right. To challenge young people who believed that Jesus wanted them to sit down, shut up, and wipe the smile off their faces, he created the “Jesus Challenge.” Children needed to understand that Jesus had a greater vision than simply removing one’s hat during prayer time and memorizing the King James Bible, as he wanted them to do.

  1. In this case, the obvious response was no.
  2. Killjoys don’t behave in this manner.
  3. Unfortunately, his point appeared to imply that Jesus enjoys getting people drunk and having a good time—at least, that is how all of my high school students interpreted it.
  4. The last thing a group of underage kids needed was to be told that.
  5. Another way to describe the personality of a man who appeared out of nowhere and miraculously produced vats of alcohol for a party?
  6. Afterward, I spent the rest of the day undoing everything that had been said by the chapel speaker.
  7. Tell you what I’m thinking: Creating deep red wines with subtle oak and cherry finishes was not a strategy for Jesus to increase his influencer status.

Was it a group of people who first heard John’s music?

The question is, however, why is John the only Gospel writer to include this story in his writings?

So, what was it about John’s audience that made this miracle so relevant to their particular situation, you might wonder.

That implies that they were either Jews who grew up in a Greco-Roman world with all of its religious beliefs or Gentiles who had developed a deep appreciation for elements of the Jewish faith during their childhood.

Their participation in religious ceremonies and secret rituals to secure divine favor became increasingly bizarre, but they had nowhere else to turn for truth, protection, and eternal life.

John decided to share this unusual story with his specialized audience because they were so intrigued by the subject matter.

“This was the beginning of the signs Jesus performed in Cana of Galilee, and it manifested his glory,” John writes at the conclusion of the water-to-wine episode (John 2:11).

Jesus’ “glory” had been revealed as a result of the miraculous event.

According to John’s Gospel, the divine Father is characterized by “glory.” It describes the God of all things, who sent Jesus to earth, over and over and over again in the book.

For what reason did Jesus’ unique reflection of the Father’s glory manifest itself in the act of making wine?

But this isn’t necessarily the case.

The God of Israel does not demonstrate his divine greatness in such a manner in any ancient poem or prophecy.

Legends about wine’s origins were passed down from generation to generation in the Greco-Roman world.

God Dionysus is credited with inventing the practice.

From the ground where Dionysus’ blood was spilled, legend has it, vines bearing dense clusters of red grapes grew up to bear fruit.

During the time when humanity had no good refreshments, Achilles Tatius tells the story of Icarius, a kind farmer and herdsman who prepared a meal for Dionysus in his book The Adventures of Leucippe and Clitophon.

To show his appreciation for the meal, Dionysus provided a cup of water for the herdsman.

In his ecstasy, he begged Dionysus to tell him how such a fine drink was created, and Dionysus happily obliged.

Dionysus has long been associated with vines, grapes, and wine, as evidenced by these legends.

The Homeric Hymn7 tells the story of how a vine sprang out of nowhere to show the god’s presence.

The presence of the vine signaled to the sailors that Dionysus was nearby, allowing them to rest comfortably.

“One-day vines” grew common in various regions of the Greco-Roman world, and it is said to have occurred at a number of sacred Dionysus shrines throughout history.

It wasn’t long until the grapes began to develop, and by nightfall, the dark and heavy fruit could be harvested and used to make a wine-like beverage.

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Dionysus’s Miraculous Wine-MakingMiracles indicating the presence of Dionysus became a feature during yearly festivals as a way of demonstrating the presence of the god Dionysus.

Pausanias describes a strange incident that occurred during a New Year’s feast in the city of Ellis, which proved that the god’s presence had returned to earth.

Those who wish to close the doors of the building include the priests themselves as well as anybody else who feels compelled.

Despite the fact that I did not personally arrive at the festival’s scheduled start time, the most respected people of Elean, as well as several outsiders, swore on my behalf that everything I have stated is correct.

Didorus Siculus and Pliny the Elder, two additional ancient historians, spoke about wine fountains that flowed spontaneously from the earth, as well as spring water from Dionysus’ temple, which had the flavor of wine on festival days, according to them.

A member of his tribe was responsible for bringing fertility to the earth, growing dense bunches of grape clusters on vines, and instructing humans on how to produce wine.

That is precisely what the people in John’s audience understood when they heard the narrative of Jesus’ incredible wine-making miracle.

Once you understand who John’s audience was, the answer is straightforward and unambiguous: In the Greco-Roman era, miracle wine-making was connected with the beneficent presence of the deity Dionysus, and they lived in a world that believed in this.

As a result of Jesus’ miracle, the belief that new vineyard growth and the production of new wine demonstrate Dionysus’ beneficent presence has been thrown into disrepute.

It was Jesus’ celestial majesty on show when he accomplished what Dionysus’ worshippers claimed their god did.

For the first time in years, everyone who had been misinformed about the approach of God’s presence would be awakened by that symbolic declaration of God’s entrance.

It is his gift to humanity that the grapes and every other form of vegetation that may be transformed into delicious beverages and delectable dishes exist.

The fact that Jesus’ miracle of turning water into wine did not encourage intoxication becomes clear when we consider the historical and theological background.

The question is, how can we bring the miracle of water to wine back to life in our modern setting.

However, we must be true to the point of his choices and words, but we must also be innovative in how we recreate his goal in our own time and location.

Delivering clean water to people living in rural places of Africa can have the same impact on them as Jesus’ miracle had on the people who gathered to witness it in John’s gospel.

In the case of disease-infested water, the creation of a cup of clean water from it might illustrate Jesus’ compassionate presence.

You may join the mission of ministries all around the globe that seek to provide wonderful things from the land that God intended for mankind to enjoy in order to get started exhibiting God’s loving presence to those who are in desperate need. ​

The Water Into Wine & What It Means Today

It is possible that we will receive compensation from the items or companies referenced in this post. Because I am an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make eligible purchases. For further information, please see our Terms and Conditions and Disclosures. What is the significance of Jesus’ transformation of water into wine? Not only was it His first miracle, but it was also one of the most momentous in history. Most likely, you’ve heard a variety of viewpoints on how Jesus began His ministry by changing water into wine, how this justifies consuming wine today, and so on.

  • What if I told you that even today, that one miracle has great importance.
  • Let’s get this party started.
  • Jesus and his followers were also invited to the wedding, as were the other guests.
  • There were now six stone water jars for the Jewish ceremonies of purification, each carrying twenty or thirty litres of water, which were placed on the altar.
  • And they stuffed them to the brim with goodies.

When the master of the feast tasted the water that had now turned into wine and realized he had no idea where it had come from (despite the knowledge of the servants who had drawn the water), he summoned the bridegroom and told him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine.” However, you have managed to save the wonderful wine till today.” This was the first of Jesus’ signs, which he performed in Cana in Galilee, and it displayed his majesty.

And he had the confidence of his followers.

Why Turn Water Into Wine?

They were at a wedding, and the wine ran out before they could toast. This was a bad situation. His mother, bless her heart, informed Him that it needed to be fixed. It was evident that He was not ready to perform a miracle at that moment, so she simply turned to the surrounding servants and instructed them to “do whatever He tells you.” Is it just me, or does Mary here come off as the Italian mother from the Bronx, carrying a wooden spoon? No? It had to be just me, then. Anyway, let’s get back to the Bible.

  1. As a matter of fact, there are several predictions in the Bible that speak of flowing wine, fresh wine, and the fruit of the vine.
  2. First and foremost, Jesus was fulfilling predictions that wine would flow when the Messiah arrived.
  3. And third, He was in the process of instilling faith (Jn 2:11 reads, “and his disciples believed in Him”).
  4. Wine was significant both culturally and religiously.

And then they ran out of money. The entire situation might have been explained away as a simple social faux pas, and everyone would have been back to normal in a day or two. But Mary wished for Jesus (the true Bridegroom) to intervene and put a stop to it.

Why Ceremonial Washing Jars?

At a wedding, the wine ran out and they had to leave. We were in for a bad situation here. Her son was told to mend it by his mother, bless her heart. It was evident that He was not ready to perform a miracle at that moment, so she simply turned to the surrounding slaves and instructed them to “do whatever He instructs you to do. Do any of you have a mental image of Mary here with a wooden spoon, like the Italian mom in the Bronx? No? After all, it’s just me here. To return to the Bible, however, it is necessary.

  1. In fact, there are several predictions in the Bible that speak of wine flowing, fresh wine, and the fruit of the vine being harvested.
  2. On the one hand, Jesus was bringing about the fulfillment of predictions that wine would flow when the Messiah arrived.
  3. He was also fostering belief (Jn 2:11 states that “and his disciples believed in Him”).
  4. Wine was significant in terms of culture and religion.
  5. In the end, they ran out of options.
  6. The true Bridegroom, on the other hand, was Mary’s desire for Jesus to intervene.

Why So Much Water Into Wine?

That suggests that Jesus transformed water into between 120 and 180 gallons of wine, depending on the number of ceremonial washing jars used (each carrying 20-30 gallons). A little after midnight, when everyone had virtually finished partying and was too drunk to enjoy it. According to the most recent available data (source), this amounts to between 750 and 1,000 bottles of wine today. Furthermore, it would have required a large quantity of grapes to produce! (No, no, no. I’m not trying to be too dramatic or blatant.

It has been predicted by the prophets that the mountain will practically flow with wine in the end days (Joel 3:18).

The Messiah had arrived, and He was heralding His arrival!

What’s Water Into Wine Mean To You…TODAY?

Today, it is easy to become engrossed in routines or sidetracked by the packaging, rather than focusing on the things that actually important. After all, decent Christians give money to missionaries and orphanages to help them in their missions. As good Christians, we should volunteer in shelters and donate our unwanted clothing to homeless groups. Furthermore, you should refrain from using profanity, listening to secular radio, or wearing low-cut blouses. Because, after all, people should be able to tell if you’re a Christian simply by looking at you, don’t they?

Even if you’re not swearing in front of other people, if you’re viewing movies that include a lot of profanity, you’re still consuming a lot of filth on a regular basis.

If you’re kind to others while yelling at your children and disregarding your husband, then you’re still in the midst of ceremonial washing and not yet in the midst of new wine. That water, on the other hand, isn’t doing you any favors. You’ll need some wine.

Jesus cares about the inside of you

Jesus’ lecture was extremely effective on that particular day, but its message is one that is still required today. Stop stressing on whether or not you are doing enough for God, or even if you are enough for God. Stop concentrating on a life that appears to be clean and shining on the outside. There was not a single person at the wedding reception who contributed to the wine’s production. No one harvested the grapes, no one stomped them, and no one strained them out of their skins. They simply rely on the Living Water to take care of them.

  • The same may be said for today.
  • Jesus, on the other hand, freely provides it to you.
  • After all of that, you’ll be spotless on the inside, which is where it counts the most.
  • This is one of the challenges for the Bible in 90 Days challenge.

Water to Wine

That day, Jesus’ lecture was extremely effective, but its message is one that is still relevant today. It’s time to stop worrying about whether or not you’re doing enough for God. Do not be concerned with maintaining an externally clean and sparkling existence. At the wedding reception, not a single person contributed anything to the preparation of the wine. The grapes weren’t harvested, they weren’t trodden, they weren’t squeezed. Instead, they just rely on the Living Water to take care of everything.

  • and Mrs.
  • In today’s world, this is still true: Whatever ritual washing you do, it will never be enough to make you worthy to enter the kingdom of God.
  • The only thing left for you to do is accept the situation.
  • In related news, here are five ways to make God happy.

Jesus Turns Water into Wine: When You Need to Know What God Can Do

Inside: The fifth devotional in the series Overcoming Fear Do you really need to be reminded that God can turn a bad situation into something good? What does it imply for us if Jesus can transform water into wine, you might wonder. Martin Fennemaon captured this image. Unsplash I’m about to go on a very difficult journey, and while I should be excited, I’m filled with dread and terror instead. The fact that Jesus can transform water into wine reminded me of something I’d forgotten, and it led me to thinking: Couldn’t he, wouldn’t he, produce something good out of something bad?

  • This was completely unprecedented and quite embarrassing.
  • She understands the suffering of the guests and believes that Jesus can bring about a resolution to the issue; as a result, she makes Jesus’ miracle-working skills a little too public, a little too soon.
  • Ha!
  • What had Mary witnessed her son accomplish when she was raising him that suggested he might be able to salvage something positive from this humiliating lack of wine?

It’s not like today’s parents would go to their sons or daughters and ask them to transform water into wine! There was something unusual about what Mary had witnessed compared to what she believed Jesus was capable of accomplishing.

What Did Mary Know?

I see Mary cooking supper one night, the strong scent of burnt fish filling their small domicile as the flames blaze brightly. Is it possible that Jesus restored the supper to its pre-burned state? That would be a fantastic solution for those times when my cooking attempts cause the smoke alarms to go off! Have his brothers scraped one of their brothers’ knees, and Jesus has cured the owie? In the Nazareth home, there was no need for a supply of Band-Aids! It was once necessary for me to borrow a small amount of almond extract from a neighbor in order to finish a dish.

While angels coming at his birth would have been one clear sign, other qualities would have verified his place in the godhead, as well as his uniqueness among all peoples of the planet, as he grew up.

She was certain that Jesus could take a poor situation and turn it around — and not just turn it around, but turn it around in ways that no one could have anticipated!

When You Need a Water-into-Wine Miracle

Do you find yourself in a difficult situation? Do things appear to be bleaker than you had anticipated? Did you know that the process of turning water into wine included a complete transformation of the water’s molecular makeup? It’s not like Jesus threw in a few drops of food coloring or a teaspoon of salt to spice things up. Not only that, but he altered the atomic structure of the liquid, a feat that necessitated the expenditure of a tremendous amount of energy and demonstrated “a mastery of natural law well beyond our current grasp.” (See the section titled “Extra Information!” for further information.) That’s exactly what I’m looking for him to accomplish for me.

  1. He always responds positively.
  2. It’s like turning water into wine.
  3. That’s what I was thinking.
  4. That is the approach I want to use in order to begin praying.
  5. How has he brought about anything positive in your life that you could not have predicted?

Jesus, who transforms water into wine, is dependable and trustworthy. The LORD is the one who goes before of you. He will always be at your side; he will never abandon or forsake you. “Do not be alarmed or discouraged.” (Deuteronomy 31:8 in the English Standard Version)

Digging Deeper: Jesus Turns Water into Wine

Consider the following questions for further consideration. If you have the opportunity, write down your replies and talk to God about them. 1. Read the tale of Jesus turning water into wine in John 2:1-11, and take note of all the wonderful things that occurred as a result of Jesus’ miracle. Make a list of your ideas or circle the ones you like. The paragraph is provided for your convenience below. 2. Can you tell me about a time in your life when God brought something wonderful out of a tough situation?

When you recollect God’s benevolence in the past, such as his turning water into wine, how does it help you with your current prayer concerns?

John 2:1-11 (ESV)

Consider the following questions for more thought. Consider journaling your responses and discussing them with God when you have the opportunity. Reading the tale of Jesus turning water into wine in John 2:1-11 and taking note of all the positive things that occurred during this event is a fantastic place to start. Take notes or draw a circle around each one of these phrases: For your convenience, the text has been reproduced below. 2. Can you tell me about a time in your life when God brought something wonderful out of a tough circumstance?

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When you recollect God’s benevolence in the past, such as his turning water into wine, how does it help you with your current prayer concerns?

Extra Info! The Science Behind Turning Water into Wine

I strongly suggest Dr. Cliff Lewis’s excellent paper on the science of Jesus’s turning water into wine, which is available online. In the words of Dr. Lewis, “Jesus truly did convert the water into wine, so showing his grandeur.” On a molecular level, the water, which is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, was transformed into wine, which comprises sugars, yeast, and water, all of which contain carbon and nitrogen in addition to oxygen and hydrogen, and which is primarily hydrogen and oxygen. When Jesus transformed water into wine, he established his dominion over the atomic structure of atoms by directing oxygen and hydrogen atoms to dismantle and reform into new atoms with other configurations.

To accomplish this without any apparent energy transition of the liquid (John makes no mention of anybody detecting the transformation) demonstrates a mastery of natural law that is well beyond our present grasp.

“With this single act, Jesus demonstrates that the fundamental forces of nature are under his command and control.” Further reading on this miracle turning water becoming wine may be found in theExtra Infosection of this page for an interpretation of this miracle as a declaration of the messianic period.

Praise and Worship: Jesus Turns Water into Wine

When it comes to entering the presence of the Lord and wiping away your problems, nothing compares to singing praises!

Sing, dance, or hum along to these songs! Things that are aesthetically pleasing (Gungor) Mighty to Save (Reuben Morgan, performed by a large number of people!) Counting Every Blessing (Rend Collective)Printable version

Marriage at Cana – Wikipedia

The term “Cana wedding” redirects here. See The Wedding at Cana for more information on the artwork by Veronese. The turning of water into wine at thewedding at Cana (also known as themarriage at Cana or themarriage feast at Cana) is the first miracle credited to Jesus in the Gospel of John, despite the fact that the wedding at Cana is not mentioned in any of the other three Gospels. Jesus Christ, his mother, and his followers are all invited to a wedding, according to the Gospel narrative. Upon noticing that the wine has run out, Jesus shows his divinity by changing water into wine at his mother’s request, an evidence of his divinity that she will never forget.

In some circles, the narrative is seen as proof of Christ’s support of marriage and worldly festivities, while in others, it has been used as a justification against strict adherence to the prohibition of alcohol.

Biblical account

It is possible to be married in Cana with a web search. The Wedding at Cana is a painting by Veronese that may be found here. When Jesus performs the miracle of turning water into wine during thewedding at Cana (also known as themarriage at Cana or the marriage feast at Cana), it is the first miracle attributed to Jesus in the Gospel of John, despite the fact that the wedding at Cana is not mentioned in the Synoptic Gospels. It is recorded in the Bible that Jesus Christ, his mother, and his apostles are all invited to a wedding celebration.

According to biblical academics and archaeologists, the site of Cana is up for question; numerous places in Galilee are suggested as potential alternatives.

Interpretation

The Wedding Feast takes place at Cana shortly after Philip and Nathanael get their summons. As recorded in John 21:2, Nathanael was born and raised in Cana. Although the wedding at Cana is not mentioned in any of the Synoptic Gospels, Christian tradition, based on John 2:11, claims that it is the first public miracle performed by Jesus. This passage is seen as having symbolic significance since it is thought to be the first of seven indications in the Narrative of John that point to Jesus’ divine character and around which the gospel is organized.

  • The narrative has played a significant role in the formation of Christian pastoral theology over the centuries.
  • Sheen believes that it is quite possible that one of Mary’s cousins was getting married, and he believes this to be true.
  • Sheen goes on to say that when Jesus arrived with extra guests, it is possible that they contributed to the lack of wine on the table.
  • In John 19:26, when he entrusts his mother to his disciple John, Jesus addresses her as “Woman” for the second time.
  • Weddings and worldly celebrations are considered approved by Jesus because of the gospel story of him being invited, participating, and using his heavenly authority to save the festivities from tragedy.

When the story is interpreted allegorically, the good news and hope implied by the story are expressed in the words of the steward of the Feast, who said, “When I tasted the good wine, I was filled with joy.” “Traditionally, the good wine is served first, followed by the inferior wine after the guests have become inebriated.

  • To put it another way, this might be read as simply stating that it is always darkest before the morning, but that wonderful things are on their way.
  • This would establish a symbolic link between Moses, who was the first saviour of the Jews through their escape from Egypt, and Jesus, who is the spiritual saviour of all people through his death on the cross.
  • One story, expressed, among others, by Thomas Aquinas, argues that the bridegroom was none other than St John the Evangelist himself.
  • A similar suggestion was made in 1854 by the Latter-day Saint elderOrson Hyde, who argued that Jesus was apolygamous and that his wedding to Mary Magdalene, Martha, and Mary of Bethany took place at Cana.
  • Scholars, on the other hand, tend to discount the notion that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene as pseudohistorical.
  • Researchers largely believe that John’s gospel was written by a group of Jewish Christians who had just been expelled by their local synagogue for acknowledging Jesus as the Messiah, which has led some to infer that the Gospel was not inspired by ancient Greek mythology.
  • Because archaeologists have discovered evidence of first-century wine production, the vista of the valley looking out towards Nazareth from Kirbet Qana would have mostly consisted of grape vineyards, according to the theory.

Identification of biblical Cana

In recent years, academics have been debating the actual location of “Cana in Galilee” (Ancient Greek:v v, Kana ts Galilaias), which is a reference to Jesus’ birthplace. Given that the Gospel of John was written to Jews who were Christians at the time, modern historians believe it is implausible that the author would identify a location that did not exist at the time. The Dominican scholar Jerome Murphy-O’Connor, on the other hand, cautions that Cana is a very common name, and that there is no known text that provides any clues as to which of the dozen towns bearing the name would be the correct one.

  • Kafr Kanna, in the Galilee
  • Khirbet Qana, also in the Galilee, which is believed to be the most likely choice
  • Kafr Kanna, in the Galilee
  • Qana is located in southern Lebanon, in an area that was historically a part of the Galilee region.

A candidate from the Galilee is Kafr Kanna; a candidate from the Galilee is Khirbet Qana, which is also in the Galilee but is thought to be a more likely choice; and a contender from the Galilee is Kafr Kanna. Southern Lebanon, in a region that was historically a part of the Galilee; Qana, in the southern Lebanon;

Stone jars

Throughout history, many people have attempted to locate and reclaim the missing jars. According to a report published on December 21, 2004, archaeologists discovered near Kafr Kanna “parts of big stone jars of the sort that the Bible claims Jesus used when he transformed water into wine.” However, American archaeologists working at the competing site of Khirbet Qana, which is located north of the original site, have claimed to have discovered fragments of stone jars dating back to the time of Jesus.

Shimon Gibson, a fellow archaeologist, expressed skepticism about the relevance of such artifacts in pinpointing the town mentioned by John, stating that similar vessels are not uncommon and that it would be hard to link a specific set of vessels to the miracle.

They were fashioned and completed on a very large lathe, and then given a pedestal foot and a few decorative details.

The lids were made of flat discs of stone.

Wine or beer

Several biblical academics, including Michael Homan, contend in the journal Biblical Archaeology Review that many early writings have been misread, with the word ‘wine’ being translated while the most logical translation is ‘beer.’ Other writers, on the other hand, have argued that the Greekoinosalways refers to wine, and that the wordikerwas available if the gospel author wished to refer to barley beer rather than just wine.

In art

There are countless depictions of The Wedding/Marriage at Cana throughout art history.

Other

SaintColumba of Iona, an Irish missionary who lived in the sixth century, is said to have done a same miracle while serving as a deacon in Ireland under the leadership ofFinnian of Movilla, refilling the supply of sacramental wine for the altar.

See also

  • History of Jesus
  • Life of Jesus as told in the New Testament
  • Ministry of Jesus
  • Miracles of Jesus
  • Chronology of Jesus

References

  1. Hendrik van der Loos is the author of this work (1965). The Signs and Wonders of Jesus. Brill Archive, volume 5, page 590. GGKEY:ZY15HUEX1RJ
  2. GGKEY:ZY15HUEX1RJ
  3. Royster, Dmitri (1999). The Signs and Wonders of Christ. St Vladimir’s Seminary Press, p. 71, ISBN 978-0-88141-193-5
  4. John 2:1–11
  5. John 2:3–5
  6. John 2:6–10
  7. John 2:11
  8. Abc Michael T. Winstanley is the author of this work (2008). Reflections on the Gospel of John’s use of symbols and spirituality. The Don Bosco Publications, pages 8–. ISBN 978-0-9555654-0-3
  9. Towner, W. S., p. 8–. (1996). “Wedding,” in P. J. Achtermeier’s “Wedding” (ed.). Pages 1205–1206 in Harper Collins Bible Dictionary (San Francisco: Harper & Row, Inc.)
  10. Ab Fulton J. Sheen is the author of this work (1952). “The Marriage Feast at Cana, in The Story of the World’s First Love.”
  11. Geisler, N. L. “The Marriage Feast at Cana, in The Story of the World’s First Love” (1982). “Wine-Drinking from a Christian Perspective” is the title of this article. Bibliotheca Sacra.49
  12. Smith, D. M. Bibliotheca Sacra.49
  13. (1988). “John”. In Mays, J. L., ed., Mays, J. L. (ed.). Harper’s Bible Commentary is a commentary on the Bible written by Harper & Row. Page 1044–1076 in Harper & Row, San Francisco
  14. Day, Bill (1997). In John’s Gospel, there is a connection to Moses. Mariner, ISBN 0-9662080-0-5
  15. Spong, John Shelby, ISBN 0-9662080-0-5 (1992). A woman gave birth to him. Harper and Row, pp. 187–199
  16. Hyde, Orson (6 October 1854), “Conference message,” Journal of Discourses,2: 82
  17. Abanes, Richard (1854), “Conference message,” Journal of Discourses,2: 82
  18. (2007). Inside Today’s Mormonism, p. 239 of Inside Today’s Mormonism. The ISBN for this book is 978-0-7369-1968-5
  19. Roberts, E. (2011). Is There a Disparity in Doctrine and Theology? (p. 54, ISBN 978-1-4497-1210-5)
  20. Ehrman, Bart D., et al (2004). Truth and fiction in The Da Vinci Code: A Historian Reveals What We Really Know about Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and Constantine, according to the novel. ISBN 978-0-19-518140-1
  21. Published by Oxford University Press in the United States. Pollmann, Karla (2017). (2017). “Jesus Christ and Dionysus: Rewriting Euripides in the Byzantine Cento – Oxford Scholarship” is the title of the research paper in question. The Oxford Scholarship Online, doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198726487.001.0001.ISBN978-0-19-872648-7
  22. Hurtado, Larry W. Oxford Scholarship Online, doi: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198726487.001.0001.ISBN978-0-19-872648-7
  23. Hurtado, Larry W. (2005). Questions surrounding the origins of Jesus’ divinity, include “How on Earth Did Jesus Become a God?” Eerdmans Publishing Company, ISBN 978-0-8028-2861-3
  24. Ehrman, Bart D. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, ISBN 978-0-8028-2861-3
  25. (2012-03-20). Did Jesus of Nazareth Exist? : The Historical Argument for the Historical Jesus of Nazareth ISBN 978-0-06-208994-6
  26. Moore, Michael (Harper Collins, ISBN 978-0-06-208994-6)
  27. (2008-02-16). Updated version of the question “What positive thing can come out of Nazareth?” The Holy Land University is a private institution located in Jerusalem. Goor, Asaph (1966). “The History of the Grape-Vine in the Holy Land.” Retrieved on 2008-08-11
  28. Goor, Asaph (1966). “The History of the Grape-Vine in the Holy Land.” Economic Botany.20(1): 46–64.doi: 10.1007/BF02861926.ISSN0013-0001.JSTOR4252702.S2CID44623301
  29. Charlesworth, James H. Economic Botany.20(1): 46–64.doi: 10.1007/BF02861926.ISSN0013-0001.JSTOR4252702.S2CID44623301
  30. Charlesworth, James H. (2006). Jesus and the study of archaeology 540–541
  31. AbcSalameh, Rima. Wm. B. Eerdmans, ISBN 978-0-8028-4880-2
  32. AbcSalameh, Rima (29 January 1994). “A Lebanese town claims to have witnessed the first miracle performed by Jesus Christ.” This is the World of Tulsa. Retrieved on June 21, 2021, from Associated Press
  33. Reed, Jonathan L., et al (2000). David Noel Freedman and Allen C. Myers are the authors of this work (eds.). Cana (Gk. Kaná) is a mythical creature from ancient Greece. The Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible is a good resource. 212 pages, ISBN 978-90-5356-503-2. Amsterdam University Press. p. 212. abLaney, J. Carl
  34. Retrieved on 15 July 2021
  35. AbLaney, J. Carl (1977). Cana of Galilee was identified as Jesus’ mother (PDF). Selective Geographical Problems in the Life of Christ (dissertation for a PhD degree) (Thesis). A guide to the Dallas Theological Seminary, pages 91–92. Ward, Bernard (1908). “Cana.” Retrieved on 15 July 2021
  36. Ward, Bernard (1908). “Cana.” According to Charles Herbermann (ed.). Vol. 3 of the Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company
  37. Ward, Bernard (1908). “Cana.” Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Robert Appleton Company, New York. Obtainable on the 16th of July, 2021, through Catholic Answers
  38. Albright, W. F. (October 1923). “Some Archaeological and Topographical Results of a Trip Throughout Palestine,” as the title of the paper states. APSOR Bulletin is the official publication of the American Schools of Oriental Research. 11(11): 3–14, published by the University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOOR) (see p.11). • Conder, Claude Reignier
  39. Doi: 10.2307/1354763.JSTOR1354763.S2CID163409706
  40. (1878). Tent Work in Palestine: A Record of Discovery and Adventure is a book about tent work in Palestine. 154
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  42. R. BentleySon
  43. Abcd “An archaeologist claims to have discovered the place of Jesus’ first miracle.” NBC News Digital is a digital version of NBC News. The Associated Press published an article on December 21, 2004. 15th of July, 2021
  44. Retrieved 15th of July, 2021
  45. Alan Millard’s full name is Alan Millard (1997). Discoveries from Biblical Times: Archaeological Treasures Provide New Understanding of the Bible The Lion Books edition, p. 184, ISBN 9780745937403. Retrieved on July 15, 2021
  46. Michael M. Homan is the author of this work (2010). “Did the ancient Israelites consume alcoholic beverages?” The Journal of Biblical Archaeology
  47. Stephen Kneale is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom (November 23, 2016). “Did Jesus really turn water into beer?” one wonders. constructing the city of Jerusalem
  48. Rao, Bandari Prabhaker (Rao, Bandari Prabhaker) (2010). The Missiological Motifs of Jesus Christ’s Miracles are found throughout the Gospels. Retrieved on April 14, 2010 from ISPCK, p. 33, ISBN9788184650259. Uuras, Saarnivaara, Saarnivaara, Uuras (April 29, 2008). Can We Put Our Faith in the Bible? : An Introduction to the Old and New Testaments and Their Interpretation. It is published by Wipf and Stock under the ISBN 9781556356995. “Bruiloft te Kana”.lib.ugent.be. Retrieved 2020-09-28
  49. “Adomnan of Iona”.lib.ugent.be. Retrieved 2020-09-28
  50. (1995). St. Columba’s life and times. Penguin

External links

  • Mark Shea is the author of this work. According to the National Catholic Register (September 10, 2012), “The Significance of the Wedding at Cana” is a significant event in the history of the Church.

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