What Wine Goes With Sushi? (Perfect answer)

For sushi, sashimi or other makis based on white fish, you can choose a lively Chardonnay with woody notes. For more fatty fish such as salmon, you may prefer a dry white like a Mâcon or a Chablis. A plate with a variety of fishes will find a good harmony with a floral white wine like a sauvignon, or a Riesling.

What type of wine do you drink with sushi?

  • Pinot Gris and Gruner Veltliner both present crisp, dry, mineral notes, making them a good pairing with crab and shrimp based sushi selections. As a substitute, dry sparkling wines such as Champagne, Cava, and Prosecco can work well so long as you choose one that leans towards the Brut side.

Contents

Does sushi pair with wine?

You might want to branch out and try a glass of wine to go with your sushi dinner. On the surface, it might not seem like wine would pair well with sushi. But a great glass of wine can be the perfect addition to any tasty sushi feast. You might be skeptical, but many wines can complement any traditional Japanese fare.

What should you drink with sushi?

With this guide, you can become an expert at beer and wine pairings that will bring out the very best of your sushi dishes.

  • Sake.
  • Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, and Pinot Grigio.
  • Champagne.
  • Pinot Noir.
  • Asahi Super Dry Lager.
  • Sapporo Lager.
  • Yoho Wednesday Cat Belgian White Nagano.
  • Cocktails.

What red wine goes with Japanese food?

These dishes are typically suited to pairing with a wide variety of wines, however the softer foodie flavours usually work with aromatic and fuller-bodied whites, such as Pinot Gris or Chardonnay. Light to medium reds can also work spectacularly well, like Pinot Noir, Gamay or Grenache.

Is Pinot Grigio sweet?

Sake. As far as Japanese drinks go, there’s nothing more popular than sake. Therefore, sushi and sake is a match made in heaven, right?

Is it bad to mix sushi and alcohol?

Drinking alcohol after sushi? Well, you can but it´s a lot better as an accompaniment. There is a medical term for the corporal process and final condition one will encounter if you overdo the alcohol: intoxication. In layman terms: you will be absolutely BLOTTO.

What alcohol goes with Japanese food?

Kobe Jones Blog

  • 5 Drinks to Accompany Your Japanese Meal. Drinking is a popular social practice in Japan so it’s no surprise that over time, they’ve perfected the art of pairing their food and drink.
  • Whiskey.
  • Umeshu.
  • Chilled beer.
  • Cassis cocktails.
  • Sake.

What wine goes with miso cod?

Today’s miso black cod recipe is rich enough to pair with the silky tannins of the pinot noir, and when dipped in soy sauce complements the umami present in the wine.

Does champagne go well with sushi?

Sushi Champagne Pairing Caviar, ikura, tobiko, and masago are classic pairings with Champagne. And really any raw sushi or sashimi will pair beautifully. No wine is better suited for an omakase. Tempura, while not sushi, is also an excellent wine and sushi pairing.

Is Riesling or Pinot Grigio sweeter?

These wines range from very dry to extra sweet. Some white wines are made from white grapes and some are made from red grapes with the skin removed. Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot grigio, White Zinfandel, and Riesling are all varieties of white. Riesling is sweet, but Moscato is sweetest.

What is a Lambrusco wine?

Lambrusco is a slightly sparkling (frizzante) red wine produced in Italy, with roots dating back to Etruscan and Roman times. Although red lambrusco is by far the most common style, the wine is also made in rosé format, as well.

Is Riesling or Chardonnay sweeter?

Riesling wines tend to be sweet, semi-sweet, and dry. Riesling, the Riesling wines tend to be medium-bodied, mildly sweet, or dry. They all tend to have some type of fruity flavor. On the other hand, Chardonnay is a medium-bodied wine with mild acidity and is usually dry rather than sweet.

6 Sushi and Wine Pairings

You might be interested in learning more about your wine tastes. Make use of our simple 7-question survey to receive tailored wine recommendations! Sushi night is, in our humble view, the most enjoyable night of the week. So, how do you go about selecting the perfect wine to go with your sushi? To be quite honest, you might easily drive yourself insane by obsessing over the minute minutiae of each and every menu item in your cart. Even a single piece of nigiri (fish over rice) or maki (roll) is a full-fledged culinary adventure in and of itself.

So don’t be concerned about selecting the appropriate wine for each roll.

It will be much easier to relax and appreciate the sushi when it arrives this manner when it comes to your table.

Pairing Tips

Here are some wines that will pair nicely with the entire dinner, regardless of whether you prefer red, white, or rosé wine.

Riesling

When it comes to sushi, Riesling is a great choice. Lingering flavors of lighter fish match nicely with a light-bodied white wine, and the subtle fruit notes and mouth-watering acidity of Riesling are ideal for this purpose. If you favor thin fish cuts such as white fish or yellowtail, a dry Riesling will complement your meal. If you enjoy peppery bites, a semi-dry Riesling is a good choice. The sweetness of the wine will balance out the heat of the dish, resulting in a harmonic combination.

Provençal Rosé

When it comes to sushi, Riesling is an excellent choice. Lingering flavors of lighter fish mix nicely with a light-bodied white wine, and the subtle fruit notes and mouth-watering acidity of Riesling are ideal for this purpose. For thin fish cuts such as white fish or yellowtail, a dry Riesling is a good match for you. Off-dry Riesling pairs well with spicy meals, and vice versa. The sweetness of the wine will balance out the heat of the dish, resulting in a harmonic combination.

Pinot Noir

Don’t be discouraged, red wine enthusiasts. Although you may have heard that white wine and fish are a good pairing, there are several laws that should be disregarded. Choose a light-bodied red wine with mild tannins, such as Pinot Noir, to get the desired effect. Strong tannins may impart a metallic flavor to fish, which is something you want to avoid at all costs. Wines from Red Burgundy – such as an Old-World Pinot Noir or a New-World Pinot Noir from a cool-climate location such as Oregon – are your best choice, especially when served with tuna or salmon.

Pairing Wine and Your Sushi Order

Don’t be discouraged, red wine enthusiasts. Even if you may have heard that white wine and fish are a good pairing, certain rules should be disregarded every now and then! Choose a light-bodied red wine with moderate tannins, such as Pinot Noir, to achieve the desired effect. Strong tannins can impart a metallic flavor to fish, which is something you want to avoid at all costs, clearly!

Wines from Red Burgundy – such as an Old-World Pinot Noir or a New-World Pinot Noir from a cool-climate location such as Oregon – are your best choice, especially when serving with tuna or salmon.

2. Eel + Grüner Veltliner

Grilled eel has a smokey flavor and can be slightly caramelized on the grill. When eating unagi (eel) rolls or dragon rolls (eel with avocado and hoisin-bbq sauce), choose a wine that will cut through the richness of the eel. Try Grüner Veltliner, a light and zesty white wine with flavors of lime, grapefruit, and white pepper; or Gewürztraminer, an aromatic white wine. Bright Cellars’Herz and Heim Grüner Veltliner are two excellent examples of this varietal. Try combining your eel sushi with Herz & Heim Grüner Veltliner for a memorable experience!

3. Light Fish + Pinot Grigio

For light, lean fish pieces served as sashimi, nigiri, or maki, pair them with a light-bodied white wine such as Albario, Pinot Grigio, or Chablis, a very light, unoaked Chardonnay from France that complements the dish. Bright Cellars’ Dead Stars and Black Holes Pinot Grigio is a wonderful example of the varietal. Bright Cellars’ Dead Stars and Black Holes Pinot Grigio are the wines we’ve chosen for this combo! This beautifully crisp white wine is made from grapes that have been responsibly cultivated in California.

4. Tuna/Salmon + Pinot Noir

Intensely flavored wines go well with fatty, powerful cuts of seafood like salmon. Instead of a Philly or Alaska roll, consider a bone dry Provençal rosé or a light-bodied red wine with your meal. For fatty tuna sushi, which is the most luxurious sushi available, use a light red wine such as Pinot Noir or Beaujolais. Pinot Noir from Bright Cellars’ Apostate. We recommend Bright Cellars’ own Apostate Pinot Noir for this match, which we think is fantastic! To go with the more oily fish, the tastes of red berry and earthy truffle will complement each other wonderfully.

5. Spicy Tuna + Riesling

If you’re making spicy mayo or chile oil for your rolls, you’ll want a somewhat sweet, low-ABV wine to help cool the heat. Riesling with a dry finish is a fantastic alternative for spicy cuisine enthusiasts. Bright Cellars’ Sunshower Riesling is a refreshing and fruity riesling. Bright Cellars’ Sunshower Riesling is the perfect low-ABV and sweet wine for this combo, and it is produced just for this occasion. The semi-sweetness of the wine will help to balance out the spiciness of the sushi dish.

6. Vegetarian maki + Rosé

If raw fish is not your thing, don’t be concerned! The finest wine to combine with veggie maki is a lighter red. Choose a light-bodied Vinho Verde to pair with crisp rolls filled with cucumber or asparagus, or a light-bodied dry rosé to serve alongside avocado rolls.

In Vino Finito

When it comes to combining sushi with wine, there is no need to be concerned. Were you disappointed to discover that your favorite menu item was not included? Send us an email and we’ll be happy to assist you in selecting a wine to go with your meal.

Subscribe to our daily email, Glass Half Full, for more wine knowledge and insight. Are you interested in receiving these wines in your next subscription box? Alternatively, you may contact our concierge service at!

Comments

Our team is made up entirely of wine enthusiasts with a lot of enthusiasm. With our great sommeliers at the helm, we’ve been thoroughly educated on everything related to wine. Writing this essay was a collaborative effort between two friends who wanted to share their knowledge of wines with the world.

The Best Wine With Sushi: 5 Truly Amazing Pairings

Learning how to balance your beverages with your food might result in a memorable dining experience that you’ll want to repeat again and again. Why is it so important to get the beverage pairings correct when you’re dining in a restaurant? This is due to the fact that various beverages will improve the tastes of both the meal and the drink. With regard to beverages that accompany sushi, it is true that the majority of the time people opt for sake or beer. If you don’t care for any of these beverages, don’t limit yourself to plain water or soda.

  • A quality wine can enhance the flavor of any meal, but there are many different types of wine to select from.
  • I’m curious, what is the finest wine to pair with sushi.
  • When most people eat sushi, their preferred beverage is either sake or Sapporo, a Japanese beer produced by the Sapporo Brewery.
  • If you’ve become tired of your normal supper beverage selections, it’s time to try something new and exciting!
  • A good glass of wine, on the other hand, may be the ideal complement to any delectable sushi feast.
  • Some wines will mix better with your sushi than others, as will some spirits.
  • Finding the proper wine may be difficult when there are so many different options to select from.
  • If you have a good concept of what sort of drink you’re searching for, perusing the wine menu at any restaurant should be a piece of cake.
  • Everyone begins with a zero.
  • Our inventory is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather to serve as a useful reference to help you choose which wines are appropriate pairings with seafood meals and which ones are not.

So, what’s the greatest wine to pair with a sushi meal, exactly? Please continue reading for our top 5 great combinations, which you may try out for yourself at your next dinner appointment.

1. Off-dry Riesling

Rieslings are a dry white wine from Germany that is traditionally served chilled. A unique grape variety is used to make these sorts of wines, and it is grown exclusively in a few parts of the German countryside. The origins of the drink, as well as the grape itself, are still a mystery to this day. The German Riesling, on the other hand, is a wonderful match with a wide variety of foods. Rieslings were traditionally thought of as a dessert wine to be served after a meal. Rieslings are known for being crisp and refreshing, and this reputation is well-deserved.

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When you’re having sushi, a dry riesling is the perfect wine to match with your dinner.

Then an off-dry Riesling is the ideal wine to combine with that particular cuisine.

When it comes to a spicy hot food, a dry wine is always the finest choice.

2. Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Burgundy-style Pinot Noir wines from Oregon’s Willamette Valley are very similar to those produced in France’s Burgundy area, which is also a major wine-producing region. Despite the fact that both regions are located at the same latitude, the grapes utilized in Willamette Valley Pinot Noir are resilient and strong for this cooler climate. The wine itself is tasty, but also delicate, which distinguishes it from the majority of red wines on the market. The “rule” that you should only drink white wine with fish is most likely something you’ve heard before.

  • There are a few red wines that will go well with sushi and seafood meals, to name a couple.
  • Because white wines are more delicate and less strong than red wines, they tend to pair well with lighter-flavored dishes.
  • A Pinot Noir from Oregon’s Willamette Valley is the ideal pairing for a sushi plate if you’re a red wine connoisseur.
  • In the event that you can’t locate a Willamette Pinot on the wine list at your favorite restaurant, consider a Gamay from the Beaujolais region of France instead.
  • Don’t give up hope, red wine enthusiasts!

3. Gruner Veltliner

In this case, sushi pairs well with a white wine from a high altitude and cold environment, and Gruner Veltliner wines from Austria, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia suit the bill nicely here. These wines feature modest fruit and mineral flavors, and they are a one-of-a-kind expression of the varietal. Gruner Veltliner is a delicious white wine that is sure to please any white wine connoisseur. Lime, lemon, and grapefruit are the key fruit tastes found in Gruner Veltliner wine, and they are also found in other types of wine.

And the trademark vein of acidity in this one-of-a-kind wine contributes to the final, mineral taste of the wine. The flavor of sushi will be enhanced by the wine character of Gruner Veltliner.

4. Provencal Rose

Are you considering getting some delectable and nutritious salmon rolls? Then a glass of dry rose will most sure not let you down on your taste buds. Look for a rose wine from the French region of Provence on the wine list of your favorite Japanese restaurant when browsing the wine list. It is said that the French vineyard was first planted in Provence about 300 B.C., making it the country’s most famous wine-growing region. When the Ancient Greek tradesmen created the city of Marseille, according to historical accounts, they brought with them wine vines and winemaking methods from their home countries.

Since then, it has continued the family legacy.

The wines in this category are often quite dry and brilliantly acidic.

As a result, you are aware that this particular style of wine is specifically meant to pair nicely with fish.

5. Champagne

Champagne isn’t simply for toasting special occasions. This widely popular condiment goes down easily and works well with a variety of meals, including sushi, and is easy to make. We owe a debt of gratitude to the ancient Romans for inventing this world-famous beverage. In France, the Champagne area has been farmed since at least the 5th century, with some historical sources indicating that it was planted much earlier. The world-famous Champagne wine began life as a pale pink, still beverage before maturing into the sparkling wine that we know and love today.

Even if you aren’t commemorating a special event and don’t want to spend the money on a bottle of champagne, a dry prosecco is a great option.

The Best Wine with Sushi: Our Picks

What’s the bottom line when it comes to the finest wines to pair with sushi? Any beverage of your choosing, to be precise. There are a plethora of wines to choose from and enjoy, and while these are some of our favorites, there are many more to try. For the sake of this guidance, please consider how dry or delicate a glass of wine should be in order to complement the tastes of lighter meals such as fish and shellfish. Experimenting with different wines is usually a great experience, and you shouldn’t feel self-conscious about ordering whatever glass you like, even if it’s not generally considered a good match for sushi.

Choosing something you appreciate can ensure that your eating experience at your favorite sushi restaurant is always enjoyable.

Then give us a call and reserve a table at one of our award-winning sushi restaurants now. With a large and high-quality wine list, you may pair any of your favorite sushi plates with a wine that will complement your meal and provide the dining experience you desire and deserve.

Pairing Wine With Sushi

With a glass of rose wine, this platter of sushi and nigiri is served. The proverb “What grows together, stays together” is one that we all know and love, but in the wine industry, this is not always the case. While sake is a wonderful accompaniment to practically every type of sushi or sashimi, many wines help bring out the fresh fish tastes in these dishes. In general, some of the most significant ground principles are that somewhat bubbly wines pair well with fish, and that wines with greater acidity pair well with fish as well.

  1. She had a great deal to say on the subject.
  2. Claire Coppi is a sushi and wine guru who specializes in pairings.
  3. Zimmerman (abbreviated L.B.Z.
  4. Claire Coppi (C.C.): Thank you for your time.
  5. Chardonnay, Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, and Grüner Veltliner are some of the varietals that will be used in these wines, among others.
  6. L.B.Z.
  7. Sake is, without a doubt, a more conventional and well-known combination, but just as there are a plethora of different sorts of fish to enjoy, there are an even greater variety of styles and expressions of wines to pair with them as well.

: Can you tell me about the sorts of wines that don’t go well with sushi and sashimi?

Exceptional quantities of tannin and fruit will entirely destroy the fish, while large levels of alcohol will increase the heat produced by the wasabi.

C.C.: The combination of a lighter white fish, such as snapper, with a crisp Chablis from Burgundy is a stunning one.

Red Burgundy, Santa Rita Hills’ Pinot Noir, or Beaujolais are some of my favorite pairings with fatty, protein-dense fish like O Toro or Bonito, which are both available at local markets.

It’s also a lot of fun to experiment with the texture of the wine and the fish itself.

Wines with a high acidity pair well with sushi.

C.C.: Once you sear the fish, you’ve brought a powerful savory component to the dish, so you’ll want to make sure the wine you serve with it matches that robust savory component.

The tertiary flavors in the wine are beginning to peek through, and the wine has enough body and backbone to hold up the fish on its own.

I was concerned that Nebbiolo’s high tannin content would make it difficult to match with fish, but I’ve been sipping Daniele Conterno’s Langhe Nebbiolo and it’s a complete and utter superstar.

: What are the greatest options for eating extremely fatty fish such as tuna?

Chardonnay, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Grüner Veltliner, and Chenin Blanc are among the white varietals with high acidity.

Finding the perfect bottle of wine to go with a full sushi-based lunch should not be a mystery or a difficult endeavor.

Halcyon Home Design is the work of Priscilla Rodrigues.

: What are some excellent bottle selections that will see a visitor through a whole meal?

At Hashimoto, a Michelin one-star unagi restaurant in Tokyo, a dish known as unajyu is shown in this photo taken on August 2, 2017.

With the help of industrial cultivation, the endangered Japanese summer delicacy may be given a second chance at life.

: What do you think are the finest unagi pairings?

There are several ways to prepare it, such with eel sauce or just salted, and the flesh itself is rather rich, with a texture and weight that is akin to paté.

The viscosity and acidity of the wine, I believe, would be absolutely lethal when paired with the luscious eel.

The addition of soy sauce and wasabi, for example, has an impact on the wine pairings.

Wasabi lends a spicy aspect to the dish, which may be readily countered with a glass of wine with a hint of residual sweetness.

L.B.Z.: C.C.: With most omakase, the fish is dressed by the sushi chef in the manner in which it is intended to be consumed, without the addition of additional soy sauce, wasabi, ginger, or other seasonings.

I strongly advise you to consume sushi as soon as it is served to you since everything is already properly balanced. Just as you can quickly overrun a fine steak by adding too much pepper or sauce, you can easily overdo a nice fish by adding too much dressing.

Best Wine For Sushi? Try One of These

When people think about sushi, the first thing that comes to mind is generally sake (pronounced “saa-kaay”), and with good reason. Sake, often known as Japanese rice wine, is actually more closely related to beer than it is to wine. That, however, is a different tale. So, instead of the traditional, let’s talk about grape-based beverages that are (sushi-friendly). The goal of this post is to simplify some of the “what if” scenarios that have been discovered via endless (and completely unselfish) tastings of wines with some of the more unique varieties of sushi available.

The Best Wine For Sushi

One of the most diversified forms of cuisine is sushi, which comes in a variety of regional versions as well as modifications for the North American market. Never before has there been such a wide variety of flavor options!

Albariño

Tempura is a good choice. Purchase the book and receive the course! With the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition, you will receive a FREE copy of the Wine 101 Course (a $50 value). Read on to find out more A strong acidity and moderate bitterness on the end characterize this refreshing white wine, which has notes of lemon, lime, green peas, and flower. Winner, winner, prawn tempura dinner: the combination of the sweetness of the shrimp, the oiliness of the deep fried Panko, and the acidity of the sauce is sensational.

Grüner Veltliner

Try it with a Dragon Roll to see how it works (Cucumber and Avocado) This native Austrian cultivar is only seldom found in other parts of the world. The notes of white pepper, green peas, lime, and lemon are prominent in these wines, which have a high acidity. It has the potential to be extremely effective when combined with a Dragon Roll (eel, crab, cucumber, avocado, eel sauce). The razor-sharp acidity cuts through the richness of the sauce and sticky rice, and the green tastes dance beautifully with the cucumber and avocado in this delicious dish.

Prosecco

Try it with a Chopped Scallop Roll for a unique twist. This sparkling wine from northern Italy, made using the tank technique, has a lively, peachy, lemony fruit flavor, occasionally with a trace of sweetness. A chilled glass of Prosecco is an excellent accompaniment to a chopped scallop wrap. Scallops are inherently sweet, silky, and delicate, and they are a delicacy. Although it can be served hot, a creamy chopped scallop roll cries out for something sweet and acidic to cut through the richness of the texture and flavor.

Provençal Rosé

Alternatively, try it with a California Roll. Provençal Rosé has a sharp acidity and is bone dry, while also being heavily dominated by red fruit and minerality in its composition. Enter the strawberries, which have been macerated on a piece of damp slate. Provence is well-known for a variety of things, the most notable of which are seafood and rosé! The crab and creamy avocado in a California roll scream out for a light, bright rosé to complement their flavors.

New Zealand Pinot Noir

Try it with the Philadelphia Roll, which is inspired by North-American cuisine. For you red wine connoisseurs, a New Zealand Pinot Noir or a rarer red Sancerre (also Pinot!) with a lighter body and tannins may be the perfect fit for your palate.

Tannins in red wine are crucial to consider when matching with fish since they can cause fish to taste metallic if they are consumed in large quantities. A Philly roll, on the other hand, has cream cheese, which helps to mitigate this impact.

Fino or Manzanilla Sherry

Give it a go with Uni (Sea Urchin) This entire story would be incomplete if Sherry had not been mentioned. A light body and salty salinity, such as those found in Fino or Manzanilla styles (pronounced man-tha-nee-ah), are a match made in heaven for seafood selections that have a more robust taste. In many ways, uni, also known as sea urchin, may be compared to foie gras of the ocean: it is silky, somewhat nutty, saline, and salty without being excessively fishy. The salinity component is critical in this situation.

Kabinett Riesling

Try it with a Spicy Tuna Roll for a unique twist. A sweetness on the Kabinett scale The combination of German Riesling and spicy tuna roll screams “foodgasm.” Sugar has long been recognized to reduce the intensity of chili heat (even the famed Sriracha), and sushi rolls are no exception. Spicy rolls are often made spicy with the use of spicy mayonnaise. An fragrant, high-acid wine with some sweetness would thus seem to be the most logical choice in this situation. Yum.

Gewürztraminer

Try it with a Spicy Tuna Roll for a unique flavor combination. The sweetness of a Kabinett. It’s hard not to get excited about German Riesling and spicy tuna roll. Sugar has long been recognized to reduce the heat of chilies (including the popular Sriracha), and sushi rolls are no exception to this rule. In most cases, spicy mayonnaise is used to provide the desired effect on the rolls. An fragrant, high-acid wine with some sweetness would thus seem to be the most logical choice in this situation.

Other Wines That Scream for Sushi

  • Gavi: A Piedmontese wine made from Cortese grapes that has a high acidity and aromas of peaches and flowers. Gavi is a popular wine in Italy. Try it with conventional sashimi for a change of pace. In the Loire Valley, this wine is known as Muscadet Sèvre et Maine (Loire Valley Fino Sherry). It has a low alcohol content and strong acidity, and it is very mineral and salty (in a good way). This is also another excellent alternative for sushi. Assyrtiko: The semi-aromatic grape from Santorini, Greece, is a fantastic match for seafood, with notes of lemon peel, white flowers, and beeswax in the bouquet. When I think of a tasty match, I think of yellow-tail. In Chablis, the Chardonnay grape is grown on Kimmeridgian clay soils that are essentially smashed up seashells from the Jurassic period. If it isn’t a sign, what is? Sherry Amontillado (Amontillado Sherry): Finally, though it hasn’t been tried as of this writing, a dry, nutty Amontillado type of Sherry seems to scream “Aburi sushi.” Aburi type sushi is made from flame-grilled seafood. A hand-held blowtorch is used to char the top of a piece of bamboo charcoal, resulting in a taste that is somewhat smokey and nutty. This is a popular dish in Vancouver, British Columbia. If possible, you should try out this combo as soon as possible and report back. (I am already drooling.)

Last Word

It is said that “if something grows together, it will go together.” Both food and wine are intricately linked elements that have evolved over thousands of years in virtually every civilization on the planet. In general, there is a reason why the wines produced in a certain region combine so well with the food of that region. However, the entire planet is a melting pot, and it is past time to experiment in the sake of scientific discovery. Kanpai!

The 12 Best Wines to Go With Sushi

It’s possible that treating yourself to a night out at a prestigious sushi restaurant is on your list of favorite things to do. You may, on the other hand, still be on the lookout for the perfect drink to accompany your dinner. Everyone with whom you speak will have a different point of view on the subject. Some may recommend beer, while others may opt for a more typical rice wine, such as shiraz. But what if you’re more of a wine drinker? Is it possible to mix wine with sushi successfully? However, many sushi connoisseurs will seek to discourage you from matching wine with sushi, citing the overwhelming and conflicting flavors as the reason for their opposition.

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And, if you do decide to drink wine, does it make a difference whatever variety you choose?

Should You Pair Wine with Sushi?

Source: @austrianwineusa for the image Let’s face it, some beverages just do not go well with certain types of cuisine. Others, on the other hand, function so perfectly together that you almost believe they were purposefully planned that way! Many seafood connoisseurs will tell you that red wine is a poor match for any sushi dish, and they are right. Because of the high tannin levels in red wine, this is a result of the wine’s tannin content. Wine enthusiasts, on the other hand, should not be disheartened!

Fortunately, there are wines available in both white and red varieties that will go wonderfully with your sushi plate. What’s important is understanding which varieties of sushi to pair with which types of wines in order to maximize your flavor expectations.

Wine and Sushi – How to Pair Them Correctly

Sushi is produced from a variety of different ingredients, each of which has its own distinct flavor profile. A variety of spicy sauces are used to enhance the dish’s enticing tastes. When these taste combinations are coupled with a wine that is either excessively acidic or overly sweet, the result can be a disastrous dining experience.

A Few Basic Sushi and Wine Principles

It is possible to make sushi using a wide variety of various ingredients, each of which has its own distinctive taste. A variety of spicy sauces are available to enhance the dish’s delectable tastes. When these taste combinations are coupled with a wine that is either excessively acidic or overly sweet, the result might be a meal that is less than satisfactory.

  • White, effervescent, or even rose wines should always be served with raw fish. Sushi pairs well with heavier red wines because they have a greater tannin content, which imparts a harsh flavor to the dish. Acidity in whiter, lighter wines is higher than in red wines, making them a far better choice for preventing a harsh bitter flavor contrast. Avoid drinking any wine that is overly sweet since it will overshadow the tangy sauces that are frequently used in sushi meals. A white wine with a flowery or fruity undertone can be a good choice if your sushi plate includes a range of fish with distinct tastes. Salmon and other fatty fish will mix best with a dry white wine
  • Typically, white fish is paired with a white wine with woody overtones
  • However, this is not always the case.

Types of Wines to Pair with Different Types of Sushi

Sushi dishes, like wine, are available in a wide variety of preparations. Sushi has a variety of flavors that necessitate the use of specific wines to complement them. Below are some of the more popular options available today.

The Traditional Option

@swtheflyguy is the source of this image. In order to fully appreciate sushi, many individuals like to go the extra mile and drink traditional rice wine with their meal. Japanese rice wine, known as Sake (pronounced sah-Kay), is a traditional beverage prepared from fermented rice that is popular around the world. Sake, in contrast to other wines, may be consumed either hot or cold, depending on your particular choice. The fruity and nutty flavor that it imparts to any seafood meal is due to its clean, sweet taste.

White Wine Options

Wine lovers who want to complement their meal with sushi will do well to investigate a few excellent white wine alternatives. White wine selections are the favored alternative due to the wide variety of scents and fruity flavors available. Some of the most popular options are given in the following section.

Gruner Veltliner

Grilled eel is one of the more popular foods to have on your sushi plate. Because eel is typically smoked and caramelized, a crisp white wine such as Gruner Veltliner will be ideal to cut through the deep fish flavor. Because of its citrusy overtones of grapefruit, lime, and white pepper, Gruner Veltliner is an excellent accompaniment for dragon (cucumber and avocado) and unagi (eel) rolls, among other things.

Dry Riesling

Grilled eel is a popular addition to your sushi plate and is available in a variety of preparations. In order to cut through the rich fish flavor of eel, a crisp white wine such as Gruner Veltliner is recommended. With its citrusy grapefruit, lime, and white pepper overtones, Gruner Veltliner is an excellent accompaniment for dragon (cucumber and avocado) and unagi (ahi) rolls.

Sauvignon Blanc

A sushi plate is never complete without some deep-fried, delectably delicious tempura on the side! If you want to appreciate your tempura without being overwhelmed by the flavor, a light-bodied wine such as Sauvignon Blanc is the perfect choice.

Prosecco

A sushi plate is never complete without some deep-fried, delectably delicious tempura on the side.

If you want to enjoy your tempura without being overwhelmed by the flavor, a light-bodied wine such as Sauvignon Blanc would be the perfect choice.

Santorini Assyrtiko

Why not pair your plate with a glass of delectable Greek red wine? The Assyrtiko wine from Santorini is well-known for being a suitable fit with a wide variety of fish meals. Because of its rich undertones of beeswax, white flowers, and citrus, it’s a great match for sashimi or yellow-tail sushi.

Albarino

An Albarino with hints of lemon, green pea, and lime gives the right amount of acidity to balance any prawn tempura on your sushi plate, and it’s easy to see why. In the case of a deep-fried Panko, Albarino provides a great flavor balance to the dish.

Rose Wine Options

If Rose is your favourite wine, there are a few selections you might explore to pair with your sushi plate, depending on your preferences.

Dry Rose

Additionally, you could be in the mood for some vegetarian maki, in addition to a couple sushi rolls. A Rose with a lighter body is an excellent choice. A light-bodied dry Rose as a complement for crunchy asparagus, cucumber, or even avocado rolls makes everything taste that much better!

Provencal Rose

The region of Provence is well-known for two things: its delicious rose wine and its delectable seafood. It makes perfect sense that these two tastes were created to complement one another! When coupled with the bone dry, strawberry-filled Provencal Rose, the creamy, strong crab and avocado taste of a California roll comes to life even more. This Rose will give your sushi meal a sharp edge on a fishy flavor that might otherwise be overwhelming.

Is There a Red Wine Option?

Red wine enthusiasts are not need to feel left out. While a dark red would provide a metallic flavor to most sushi fish varieties, there is one that you may use instead.

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is a light-bodied red wine with a delicate tannic structure. The ideal selection is a Red Burgundy that has been grown in a cool environment. It’s the ideal complement to a dinner that includes tuna and salmon. If you’re having sushi, you might want to go easy on the soy sauce to avoid a strong, bitter taste that will interfere with your wine.

Sherry Options

In terms of body, Pinot Noir is a light-bodied red with low tannins. Wines from cool temperature regions, such as Red Burgundy, are the ideal choice. An entree of tuna and salmon is the ideal pairing for this recipe. To avoid a harsh, bitter aftertaste with your wine, you may wish to use less soy sauce in conjunction with your sushi plate.

Amontillado Sherry

Aburi sushi is a delicious flame-grilled fish dish. When charring the top of the fish, a hand-held blow torch combined with bamboo charcoal is typically used to provide the famed nutty smoked taste that has become synonymous with the dish. If you keep these considerations in mind, the dry, nutty flavor of an Amontillado Sherry is by far the greatest choice for enhancing your tasting experience.

Manzanilla Sherry

It is a marriage made in heaven if you have ever had uni (sea urchin) with the brinyManzanilla Sherry, which you should try. Because uni has a nutty, smooth flavor, the saltiness provided by this specific Sherry is the key to this fantastic match!

Can You Pair Sparkling Wines with Sushi?

Champagne and other sparkling wines aren’t just for special occasions; they’re also great for everyday drinking. Because sparkling wines have a significantly lower tannin content than table wines, they are an excellent choice for pairing with sushi. Selecting a sparkling wine that isn’t too sugary is the key to this recipe.

Because champagne is often considered to be the most delicate of all wines, it enhances the flavors of a sushi plate. A nice example would be a Blanc de Blanc, which goes really well with a variety of seafood meals, such as sushi and scallops, among others.

Final Thought

The combination of wine and sushi platters is a delicious option for wine enthusiasts who enjoy the odd bite of sushi on a special occasion. Even while many people like to stick to tradition and serve their sushi platters with rice wine, the good news is that you may substitute any of your favorite wines. The good news is that, depending on the cuisine you’ve chosen, you may choose from a choice of white, red, or rose wines to complement it. It is more probable that you will find the right combination for your taste if you play with the possibilities we’ve provided, the more time you will have.

Best Wine with Sushi: Pairing 22 White, Red, & Sparkling Wines (2021)

Sake and sushi can be a fantastic pairing when done well. But what if you like a glass of wine instead? It turns out that there are some incredible wine and sushi pairings available as well. For more than a decade, I’ve worked in the wine and sushi industry as a waiter, bartender, and sommelier. In addition, as the beverage director at one of the country’s greatest sushi restaurants, I’ve had the opportunity to sample a wide range of wines paired with sushi. This post includes some of my favorite wine and sushi pairings, as well as some traditional pairings that you should try.

How to Choose the Best Wine With Sushi

When it comes to pairing sushi with wine, making the right choice may be difficult. There are many different grape varietals and wine areas that go well with sushi and sashimi, which is fortunate because there are so many. There are so many that the best way to begin is by selecting wines that should not be served with sushi. Tannins and heavy oak might have a negative reaction with raw seafood and raw veggies. The flavor of sushi can be overwhelmed by powerful and rich red wines, whereas clean-flavored fish can be overpowered by strong and rich white wines.

Wines that combine well with sushi and sashimi include almost all whites, most roses, and most sparkling wines.

Of course, there are many different kinds of sushi and sashimi to choose from.

As a result, throughout this piece, I will provide both general and particular matching recommendations.

Best White Wine With Sushi

A hard task might be selecting the ideal wine to combine with sushi. There are many different grape kinds and wine areas that pair well with sushi and sashimi, which is fortunate because there are so many options. The number of options is so great, that the best place to start is with a list of wines to avoid when eating sushi! With raw seafood or vegetables, tannins and strong oak might be a bad match. The flavor of sushi can be overwhelmed by powerful and rich red wines, whereas clean-flavored fish can be overpowered by powerful and rich white wines.

Sashimi and sushi are excellent partners for almost any white, rose, or sparkling wine.

In terms of sushi and sashimi, there are several options.

Slices of hirame sashimi with delicate flavors and 20-ingredient rolls smothered with spicy mayo and eel sauce are two very different things. As a result, throughout this piece, I will provide both broad and particular matching recommendations.

Albariño With Shiromi and Shellfish

The albario is a sure-fire hit at the sushi bar. It is possible to drink your way through a whole omakase sushi or sashimi experience with only one glass or bottle of Riesling or Vinho Verde. Albario is also capable of making Western-style sushi rolls, if that is what you want. Nigiri, sashimi, and plain maki sushi are some of the best ways to enjoy this wine. Shellfish like as uni, ebi, and amaebi, whether raw or lightly cooked, pair beautifully with Albario. It’s also great with white fish (shiromi) and fatty fish like hamachi and maguro, to name a few combinations.

Sauvignon Blanc and Mackerel

If you’re at the sushi bar, albario is a slam-dunk. Drinking a glass or bottle of Riesling or Vinho Verde can get you through an entire sushi or sashimi omakase experience. Albario is also capable of making Western-style sushi rolls, if that is something you like. In the context of sushi, this wine is particularly effective with nigiri, sashimi, and plain maki sushi. Shellfish like as uni, ebi, and amaebi, which are served raw or lightly cooked, pair beautifully with Albario wines. Additionally, I enjoy it when served with white fish (shiromi) and fatty fish such as hamachi or maguro.

Gruner Goes With It

Known for its dryness, minerality, and complexity, Grüner Veltliner is an Austrian grape. A glass of this wine works well with nearly anything at the sushi bar. I enjoy it with a variety of sushi and sashimi dishes. Wines from the Wachau, Kremstal, and Kamptal regions are often full-bodied and peppery in flavor. They work wonders when combined with pickled ginger (gari). More complicated sushi rolls and fatty/oily delicacies like as otoro, toro, saba, and aji are also within their reach for these fearless gruners.

Txakoli and Shellfish

Winemakers in Austria make a kind of grapes called Grüner Veltliner that are dry, mineral-forward, and complex. When it comes to sushi, this wine works well with almost anything. The combination of sushi and sashimi that I enjoy the most is endless. Typically, wines from the Wachau, Kremstal, and Kamptal have a full-bodied, peppery character. With pickled ginger, they’re a magical duo (gari). More intricate sushi rolls and fatty/oily delicacies like as otoro, toro, saba, and aji are also within their reach for these fearless gruners!

Muscadet and Raw Seafood

Muscadet Sèvre et Maine is a coastal wine area in France’s Loire Valley that produces Muscadet wines. The wines, which are created from the Melon de Bourgogne vine, are light, mineral, and salty in character. These tastes pair nicely with raw slices of nigiri and sashimi, as well as other raw seafood. I really enjoy it when served with white fish (shiromi), ikura, and uni. Muscadet is also a good match for mild-flavored cheeses such as brie. When it comes to a Philadelphia roll, this is the ideal combo.

Dry and Semi-Sweet Riesling

Riesling is a grape that is frequently misunderstood and deserves to be given greater attention. And it’s without a doubt one of the greatest wines to pair with sushi and sashimi on the market. Nigiri, sashimi, and simple rolls are all wonderful pairings for a dry riesling. Rieslings from Austria and Australia are frequently extremely dry and exceedingly nuanced, yet they are often very expensive. Rheingau riesling is also known for being dry. This wine goes well with everything at the sushi bar, which is another plus.

Rieslings with a hint of sweetness pair perfectly with hot sushi. Combine the rolls with riesling if you want your rolls with a little kick. In particular, wines from the Finger Lakes and Washington State are frequently slightly sweet in nature.

Vouvray, Wasabi, and Ginger

Located in the Loire Valley, Vouvray is a wine area known for its chenin blanc, which is used to make both dry and sweet wines. The smells and tastes of ginger, honey, and citrus may be found in many of the wines produced in this region. It is also a fan of wasabi. Because of these traits, Vouvray is considered to be one of the greatest wines to pair with sushi. It goes very well with nigiri, and it’s especially delicious when served with rich and oily fish like toro, saba, and aji. As a side note, Vouvray is a fantastic pairing with spicy sushi rolls.

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Pinot Gris and Gari

There is enough of fruit in this Pinot gris, but there is also just a tinge of bitterness in the finish. This grape, like chenin blanc from Vouvray, has a tendency to pair well with pickled ginger and wasabi, as well. As a result, pinot gris works well with a wide variety of nigiri, sashimi, and maki dishes. Pair pinot gris with saba, aji, and spicy sushi rolls to create a delicious meal with ease. It’s possible that you’ve savored pinot gris without even realizing it. Pinot grigio is the name given to this French grape by the Italians.

Despite the fact that it is not as sophisticated as pinot gris, it goes nicely with light slices of raw fish sushi and basic maki roll combinations.

Pairing SushiRose

There is enough of fruit in this Pinot gris, but there is also just a tinge of bitterness on the finish. When paired with pickled ginger and wasabi, this grape has a similar flavor profile to chenin blanc from Vouvray. In other words, pinot gris goes well with a wide variety of sushi, sashimi, and maki dishes. With confidence, pair pinot gris with saba, aji, and spicy sushi rolls. Pinot gris is a wine that many people appreciate, yet many people are unaware of it. In Italy, this French grape is referred to as Pinot grigio (white wine).

Despite the fact that it is not as sophisticated as pinot gris, it goes nicely with light raw fish sushi and basic maki rolls.

Provence Rose

This Mediterranean location is known as the “Rose Garden.” Furthermore, these wines are designed to pair nicely with shellfish. Roses with tuna, octopus, and crab are some of my favorite combinations. Nigiri and sushi rolls that have been seared are also a good match.

Pinot Noir Rose

Roses produced with pinot noir are often fruity and refreshing. The fact that they’re often round, complex, and fruity makes them my favorite rose to pair with sushi. Sushi and sashimi made from salmon are great when paired with pinot noir rose. In addition, it is capable of handling different salmon preparations such as salt-grilled or broiled salmon. Sushi rolls with fruit fillings are another delectable combination.

Best Red Wine for Sushi

It is not necessary to avoid pairing red wine with sushi. Around the world, lighter, less tannic reds are being produced. Furthermore, this design is suitable for a wide variety of sushi.

Gamay and Sushi

Gamay has a reputation for being juicy, mellow, and low in tannins. The Beaujolais area is the most well-known for its gamay production. These wines range from the straightforward and fruity (Beaujolais Nouveau) to the serious and sophisticated (Beaujolais Grand Cru) (Beaujolais Cru).

This is my top recommendation if you want to have a glass of red wine with some sushi. Pair gamay with other fish such as toro, unagi, and black cod. It also goes well with other foods that can be found in Japanese restaurants like as nitsuke and aradaki, which are also delicious.

Pinot Noir at the Sushi Bar

A typical Gamay is juicier than a Cabernet Sauvignon and has a milder flavor profile. Traditionally, gamay is produced in the Beaujolais area. From the straightforward and delicious (Beaujolais Nouveau) to the serious and sophisticated (Beaujolais Grand Cru), these wines have something for everyone (Beaujolais Cru). Here’s where you should go if you want to drink red wine and eat sushi. Pair gamay with other fish like as toro, unagi, and black cod for a delicious dinner. It also goes well with other foods that can be found in Japanese restaurants such as nitsuke and aradaki, among others.

Barbera: Italy’s Answer to Pinot

Barbera d’Asti and Barbera d’Alba are two varieties of red wine that share many traits with superb red Burgundy. In addition, they are typically far more economical than other options. These herbaceous, fruity reds pair perfectly with grilled or broiled fish or shellfish. Barbera is also a favorite of mine when served with salmon, tuna, and hamachi.

Elegant, Aged Rioja

Rioja, Spain produces tempranillo-based wines that are frequently astounding in their complexity while still being excellent value for money. And many of them are aged for several years before being made available for purchase. Lopez de Heredia is one of my favorite wineries, and it’s easy to see why. In Japanese restaurants, I like to combine their wines with dishes that have been sautéed or grilled. Miso or sake kasu-marinated Black cod, in particular, is delicious. Salmon, toro, unagi, and anago are other good partners for this dish.

Juicy Malbec and Barbecued Eel

Malbec from Mendoza, Argentina, has the potential to be a juice bomb. Typically, they are semi-sweet and smooth in texture, with just modest tannins. Cooked black fish and grilled unagi sushi are two dishes that Malbecs may be served with great success. Dragon rolls and rich, spicy sushi rolls can also be used successfully. Is it possible to locate white wines that go better with sushi? Absolutely. However, if you want full-bodied red wines, malbec might make for an excellent sushi accompaniment.

Best Sparkling Wine With Sushi

It is possible to get a juice bomb out of a Malbec from Mendoza, Argentina! They are frequently semi-sweet and smooth in texture, with just modest tannins in the tannin profile. Cooked black fish and grilled unagi sushi are two dishes that Malbecs pair well with. As an alternative, dragon rolls and rich, spicy sushi rolls are acceptable. What white wines go best with sushi, and where can you purchase them? Absolutely. In contrast, if you want rich, full-bodied red wines, malbec might make for a good sushi companion.

Sushi Champagne Pairing

Champagne is the most well-known and esteemed variety of sparkling wine in the world. In terms of celebratory beverages, Champagne is hard to surpass. Champagne is the most costly, full-bodied, and oaky of the sparkling wines on our list, and it is also the most expensive.

The classic Champagne combinations include caviar, ikura, tobiko, and masago, among others. And, actually, any raw sushi or sashimi would go well with this dish. There is no finer wine to pair with an omakase meal. Tempura, while not technically sushi, is a delicious accompaniment to sushi and wine.

Cava: Poor Man’s Champagne

Cava is Spain’s response to the Champagne of the world. It is normally matured for a shorter period of time and is significantly more affordable in terms of pricing. Cava may be paired with everything that would normally be served with Champagne, including roe, nigiri, sashimi, and tempura.

Prosecco and Rolls

Prosecco is a sparkling wine from Italy that is often light, fruity, and lively in flavor. Served with a variety of raw seafood and shellfish, these reasonably priced sparklers are rather tasty. Prosecco, on the other hand, is a fantastic pairing with Western-style sushi rolls. Prosecco goes well with spicy foods, as well as dishes that have a lot of components and/or sauce.

Moscato and Spice

Moscato d’Asti is an Italian sparkling wine that is super-light and semi-sweet in flavor. They have a mild bubbly aspect to them, as well as a delicate texture. When it comes to spicy sushi rolls, this wine is a fantastic match.

Pairing Fortified Wine With Sushi

Fortified wine is frequently regarded as a speciality type for consumption after dinner. However, they can also be a wonderful match for some types of sushi, depending on the variety.

Dry Sherry and Sushi

Originally from Spain, sherry is a fortified wine with a bizarre preference for shellfish. Oysters and dry sherry varieties such as Fino and Amontillado are my favorite pairings for this dish. Furthermore, they are one of the greatest wines to pair with sushi and sashimi, period.

Tawny Port and Unagi

Freshwater eel is not something I consume frequently since the fisheries for it are not sustainable. However, I really enjoy the flavor of it. Unagi nigiri is a dish that I enjoy as a dessert quite frequently. And it’s a fantastic pairing with tawny Port wine.

How to Pair Wine With Sushi

Despite the fact that it may seem normal to drink sake at a sushi restaurant, just as it would be natural to drink Nero D’Avola in an Italian restaurant, for some people, sushi and sake aren’t quite a marriage made in heaven. Sake has long been considered a novelty and acquired flavor by many American palates, yet it has long been the preferred beverage for sushi in Japan, where they have a tradition of being served together. However, if the sui generisexpression of sake’s taste is not to your liking, wine may be paired with your shrimp tempura roll or salmon nigiri just as well.

Raw Seafood

In general, fatty portions of fish require wines with more acidity and tannins, whereas leaner pieces of fish require wines with a softer, rounder texture. With simple cooked fish like as sashimi, the discussion is about how to add acid to cut through the fat and enhance the flavor. “With Chablis or dry Rieslings, such as 2016 Domaine Moreau-Naudet Chablis 1er Cru Forêts or 1990 J.B. Becker Riesling Spätlese Trocken Wallufer Berg Bildstock, I find it very enjoyable to drink together. This richness is cut through with a saline minerality of the Chablis and a cutting acidity of Riesling, both of which are excellent choices for this dish “Chelsea Carrier, beverage director for the city of New York, states ‘As a result, yes.

Fresh seafood such as hamachi (Pacific yellowtail or amberjack),amaebi (sweet shrimp) andhotate (scallop) go well with a crisp Chablis, according to Frank Cisneros, beverage director of the Michelin-starred restaurant Ichimura at Uch in Los Angeles.

Salmon is a simple match to remember: just think “pink.” A rosé from Provence, to be precise, is recommended by Yuki Minakawa, beverage director at Sushi Ginza Onodera in Tokyo.

Choose an Alsatian wine, such as a dry Muscat like the 2010 Domaine Zind Humbrecht, to complement your meal.

Complementing the flavor of mackerel, this sauce has a varied flavor profile with salt and a hint of white pepper, and its acidity helps to balance the fat.

Cooked Seafood

Fatty seafood requires wines with more acidity and tannins, whilst leaner fish requires wines that are softer and rounder in texture. Simply cooked fish such as sashimi are paired with acid to cut through fat, which is discussed in detail in the next section: “With Chablis or dry Rieslings, such as 2016 Domaine Moreau-Naudet Chablis 1er Cru Forêts or 1990 J.B. Becker Riesling Spätlese Trocken Wallufer Berg Bildstock, I find it very enjoyable to match them together. This richness is cut through with a saline minerality of the Chablis and a cutting acidity of Riesling, which is a combination of both “”Beverage director of New York City, Chelsea Carrier, states As a result, you’re correct.

  1. In addition to lighter dishes like as hamachi (Pacific yellowtail or amberjack), amaebi (sweet shrimp), and hotate (scallop), Frank Cisneros, beverage director of Michelin-starred restaurant Ichimura at Uch, recommends a crisp Chablis.
  2. When it comes to salmon, it’s easy to remember to choose pink.
  3. To avoid having an overpowering fishy aftertaste, strong fish like mackerel should be served with a wine to balance off its intense flavor.
  4. According to Masa’s beverage director, Jonathan Charnay, “It has an intense fragrance of white flowers on the nose and a touch of white peach on the tongue, which will make the mackerel taste much more delicate.” The Grüner Veltliner is another wine that Minakawa recommends.

Uni

According to Charnay, uni may be compared to “ice cream from the ocean.” Sweet and salty aromas, powerful and concentrated, and a creamy and silky texture characterize this dish. Put together a decadent pairing of uni and Champagne to match the opulence. Charnay prefers a modest dose, such as the 2005 AgrapartFils Extra Brut Blanc de Blancs Grand Cru Mineral, which he purchased in 2005. If you don’t want to drink Champagne, other options recommended by the experts are Puligny-Montrachet from Burgundy or a Grüner Veltliner grape variety from Austria.

Squid

The delicate aromas of squid are buried under its naturally hard, almost rubbery texture, which makes it a great dish for sharing.

The delicate aromas of the squid are brought out by a Pigato from Liguria, Italy (such as the 2017 Laura Aschero Pigato Riviera Ligure di Ponente), which is filled with citrus fruit and minerality, according to Charnay’s recommendation.

Tamago(Sweet Egg Omelette)

Tamago has a delicate flavor and a light texture. It can be served sashimi-style (with no rice or seaweed) or over a bed of sushi rice that has been tied together with a nori strip (for a more traditional presentation). Minakawa mixes tamago with a Riesling Kabinett to bring together the sweet notes of the two ingredients.

Vegetable

Wines that are crisp and clean with a hint of acidity are the perfect pairing for vegetable rolls such as cucumber or avocado. For cucumber rolls, Charnay advises a low-alcohol Vinho Verde from Portugal (2017 Aphros Loureiro), while for avocado rolls, she suggests a light, dry rosé from the Provence region. adding a dash of pomegranate and lemony acidity, this salad will raise the avocado tastes to a higher level.”

Tempura

Due to the high fat content of tempura foods, wines with structure as well as high acidity or tannins are recommended. A white Burgundy such as Puligny or Chassagne-Montrachet is recommended depending on the type of tempura served at the restaurant. Carrier from o yeah selects a Chenin Blanc that is little off-dry in style. “Using an off-dry wine will provide the impression of having more substance, while the refreshing acidity of Chenin Blanc will cut through the tempura. Domaine Huet (Demi-Sec) from Vouvray is one of my favorite producers to pair with a variety of tempura meals, and it is also one of my favorite producers overall “she explains.

Sashimi vs. Nigiri vs. Maki

In order to complement the high fat content of tempura, wines with structure as well as strong acidity or tannins should be served alongside the meal. A white Burgundy such as Puligny or Chassagne-Montrachet, depending on the type of tempura, is recommended by Charnay. o ya’s Carrier selects a Chenin Blanc that is little off-dry in style. “In this case, the sugar in an off-dry wine will provide the impression of body, while the refreshing acidity of Chenin Blanc will cut through the tempura.

A lean Champagne will also help to cleanse the palette of fried tastes, but avoid wines with excessive alcohol content to avoid drying the palate more.

General Rules

Because of the high fat content of tempura foods, wines with texture as well as strong acidity or tannins are recommended. A white Burgundy such as Puligny or Chassagne-Montrachet, depending on the type of tempura, is recommended by Charnay. Carrier from o ya selects a Chenin Blanc that is off-dry in style. “The sugar in an off-dry wine will provide the impression of body, while the refreshing acidity of Chenin Blanc will cut through the tempura.

Domaine Huet (Demi-Sec) from Vouvray, France, is one of my favorite producers to combine with a variety of tempura meals “” she explains. You may also go for a light Champagne to help cleanse your palette of fried tastes, but avoid wines that contain excessive amounts of alcohol.

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