What Wine Goes With Fish? (TOP 5 Tips)

7 Wine Styles to Pair With Fish

  • Prosecco and Fried Fish.
  • Moscato and Spicy Fish.
  • American Pinot Gris and Oily Fish.
  • French Sauvignon Blanc and Mild White Fish.
  • White Zinfandel and Dense Fish.
  • Pinot Noir and Freshwater Fish.
  • Gamay and Sea Bass.

Contents

What kind of wine do you serve with fish?

Red wine like Pinot Noir, Merlot or Zinfandel call for fish like salmon or tuna. The fruitiness and fresh taste of the wine is a great complement and tones down the “fishiness” of salmon and tuna getting too carried away. They also play well with the aromas and texture of the fish.

Do you drink red or white wine with fish?

According to tradition, you’re supposed to drink white wine with seafood, but sometimes red wines make an ideal pairing. When pairing wine and seafood, the type of fish or shellfish and how you’re preparing it matters. Texture and flavors are essential considerations to keep in mind.

What wine goes with white fish?

Delicate white fish fillets need a lighter white wine; think Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris, Albariño or Grüner Veltiner. Meanwhile meatier fish like tuna can stand up to more robust flavours such as oaked Chardonnay, Viognier or rosé.

What red wine works with fish?

Beaujolais and Pinot Noir are good bets ‘Red wine with fish.

What do you drink with fish?

Perfect Pairings: 5 Refreshing Drink Ideas to Serve With Fish

  • White Peach Sangria and Ceviche. Take advantage of peach season by making a pitcher of this white peach sangria.
  • Sweet Tea and Grilled Seafood.
  • Lime Margaritas and Fish Tacos.
  • Cucumber Coolers and Chinese Cuisine.
  • Coconut Lemonade with Coconut Crusted Shrimp.

What drink goes well with fish?

A vodka cocktail is a great choice to pair with fresh seafood, especially fish. With so many vodka cocktails to choose from, we recommend the Moscow mule for its citrus flavors. All it takes to make this delicious drink is two ounces of vodka, ½ ounce of lime juice, and six ounces of ginger beer over ice.

Why shouldn’t you drink red wine with fish?

A tannic wine is likely to leave a slightly dryer taste in the mouth. While desirable when pairing with red meat, tannins will get in the way of the flavorful nuances of fish, especially more delicate white fish like halibut and cod. Second, don’t pair your red wine selection with citrusy recipes.

Is it OK to have red wine with fish?

Red wine tends to have a higher iron content, hence the admonition against mixing it with seafood.

Is Chardonnay good with fish?

Seafood. As with chicken, seafood is always a go-to food pairing when it comes to white wines, and chardonnay is no different. Chardonnay is going to go well with butter or nutty flavors. When it comes to seafood it will pair well with seafood dishes based on shellfish like crab, lobster, shrimp, and mussels.

What alcohol goes with fish?

White wine is the go-to choice for pairing with seafood. Similar to a squeeze of lemon, dry white wine adds splashes of citrus and a bit of sweetness to buttery, briny seafood. 2. White Wine

  • Chenin blanc.
  • Chardonnay.
  • Pinot grigio.
  • Sauvignon blanc.
  • Sancerre.
  • Riesling.
  • Chablis.

What wine goes with mackerel?

Meaty fish such as salmon, mackerel, swordfish, monkfish and tuna tend to match with rich white wines. Examples include fuller-bodied whites from Friuli in northern Italy, and richer white Burgundy, including Pouilly-Fuissé and Chassagne-Montrachet. A Sauvignon Blanc-Semillon blend can also work very well.

Why is white wine served with fish?

Red wines are almost always higher in tannins; their astringency can make the wine feel a bit “drying” on its own. Meanwhile, white wine can be a better complement to fish because of its higher acidity, which I like to think of as a squirt of lemon juice to brighten the flavors of seafood.

How do you pair wine with seafood?

Light and flaky cuts of fish like sea bass or branzino pair well with a light and zippy white wine like Sauvignon Blanc, Grüner Veltliner, or Pinot Grigio. Fish with a heavier texture like tuna or salmon pair well with a rich white wine like oaked Chardonnay, or even a light red wine like Pinot Noir.

What Italian red wine goes with fish?

You CAN Drink Red Wine with Fish!

  • Chianti: Situated in the region of Tuscany in central Italy, Chianti is probably the best-known of all Italian wine districts.
  • Pinot Noir: Pinot Noir features strong, oaky overtones and is considered a moderately dry, light-to-medium bodied wine.

What type of wine goes with salmon?

BASICS TO PAIRING WINE WITH SALMON Full-Bodied White Wines – As a general rule, rich oily fish like Salmon pair wonderfully with full-bodied white wines like oak-aged Chardonnay, Viognier, Marsanne, White Rioja, White Burgundy, and White Pinot Noir.

7 Wine Styles to Pair With Fish

A flaky white fish and an aromatic dry white wine have traditionally been the only options when planning a dinner menu that includes both wine and fish. However, this is no longer the case! While dry white wine and mild white fish are a classic coupling, there are a plethora of other options that are equally delicious and nuanced on the tongue. Here are some suggestions. When presenting fish as the highlight of your meal, it’s time to think beyond the traditional dry white wine and investigate the entire spectrum of wine options available.

1. Prosecco and Fried Fish

However, while many people feel that the sweet Italian sparkling white wine, Prosecco, should be served with a dessert that is very sweet, in reality, the two forceful bursts of sweet flavor can often overload the palette. A better approach would be to serve this fizzy beverage alongside a salty fish meal. Traditional dishes such as fried fish and chips, which are usually cooked with cod or haddock, are the ideal accompaniment to Prosecco’s crisp, lemony sweetness. Acidity and effervescence in this sweet wine enhance the flavor of the delicious beer battered coating on the chicken wings.

2. Moscato and Spicy Fish

However, while many people feel that the sweet Italian sparkling white wine, Prosecco, should be served with a sweet meal such as dessert, in reality, the two forceful bursts of sweet flavor can often overload the palette. This effervescent beverage would be better served alongside a salty fish entrée. Traditional dishes such as fried fish and chips, which are usually cooked with cod or haddock, are the ideal accompaniment to Prosecco’s crispy, lemony sweetness. Acidity and effervescence in this sweet wine enhance the flavor of the savory beer battered coating.

3. American Pinot Gris and Oily Fish

Pinot Gris is well-known for being the ideal wine to pair with a variety of fish recipes. Because of its strong acidity and fruity tastes, it is a fantastic complement for seafood enthusiasts. Pinot Gris is a dry white wine that is best served chilled because it is more akin to a dry white wine. The acidity of Pinot Gris cultivated in the United States is lower than that of Pinot Gris grown in France or Italy. This refreshing wine pairs well with a fatty fish dish. A wonderful grilled mackerel dish will assist to bring out the citrus and fruity characteristics of this wine even more.

4. French Sauvignon Blanc and Mild White Fish

With many different sorts of fish dishes, Pinot Gris is a wine that is well-known. Because of its strong acidity and fruity notes, it is an excellent match with shellfish. Pinot Gris is a dry white wine that is best served cold since it is more akin to a rosé. Compared to Pinot Gris cultivated in France or Italy, Pinot Gris from America has a lower acidity. With greasy seafood, this crisp white wine is a perfect pairing. A wonderful grilled mackerel dish will assist to bring out the citrus and fruity notes of this wine even more.

5. White Zinfandel and Dense Fish

Wine enthusiasts have long praised white Zinfandel for its sweet flavor and ease of consumption. It has long been considered a good first wine for many. Despite the fact that many of us begin by drinking White Zinfandel, we eventually progress to more sophisticated and nuanced wines as our palates mature and our knowledge of wine grows. White Zinfandel is a red wine that originated in the United States in the 1970s when California’s Sutter Home was aiming to produce a new red wine that would make a dent in the white wine market that dominated the time period.

In order to balance out some of the sweetness of White Zinfandel, consider serving it with a hard, thick seafood such as tuna, which should be grilled and served like a steak.

With the addition of this seafood, the wine’s subtle, concealed notes begin to emerge. This wine’s spicy wood and blackberry aromas may begin to emerge in your mouth as you drink it.

6. Pinot Noir and Freshwater Fish

Although it’s common knowledge that red wine should never be served with fish, this is not always the case. Yes, the high tannin level of many red wines causes the bites of fish to taste metallic when consumed with them. Some red wines may be coupled with specific types of fish, and the pairing can actually enhance the flavors of both the wine and the fish together. Pinot Noir is an example of a red wine that may be enjoyed in a variety of situations. Pinot Noir is a light-bodied red wine with a delicate flavor that is not as powerful as many other red wine varietals.

In fact, some people believe that Pinot Noir may be combined with nearly any food or beverage.

Additionally, your fish dish should be on the heavier side, and it should be served with a rich tomato or cream sauce.

The more nuanced notes of a fine Pinot Noir, such as vanilla, clove, licorice, and caramel, may be brought out by pairing it with the proper seafood.

7. Gamay and Sea Bass

When compared to Pinot Noir, Gamay wine is another alternative red wine option for people who prefer it over the equivalent kind. Identical in composition to Pinot Noir, Gamay is a grape variety that is mostly farmed in the Beaujolais area of France. It is a cold wine that is best enjoyed immediately after opening. Gamay wine, like Pinot Noir, has a low tannin level, which makes it an excellent choice for pairing with seafood. Gamay, on the other hand, is far less expensive than the versatile Pinot Noir, making it an appealing red wine for practically everyone.

It is possible that the strong acidity of Gamay will assist in bringing out the flavors of the fish while also complementing the hidden notes of Gamay such as banana, violet, and black currant.

Since the inception of the wine business, foodies have been on the lookout for new and distinct sorts of wine pairings to experiment with.

Wine pairings that are innovative and intelligent demonstrate the depth and thoughtfulness of your meal offerings while also opening the palette to new possibilities.

What Wine Goes With Fish

Seafood is incredibly great on its own, but understanding about the wines that go well with it makes the experience that much more enjoyable. From salmon and halibut to swordfish and sardines, keep reading to find out the finest wine matches for fish of all kinds. Fish come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. Fish are available in a variety of flavors, from mild to powerful, and in a variety of textures, from flaky to thick and dense. Because there is such a vast variety of fish available, there is also a wide range of wines that may be served with fish.

  1. Seafood and white wine pairings are well-known, and often consist of a diverse selection of white wines.
  2. Whatever wine you pick, if you are cooking at home, most businesses can have wine delivered to your door, saving you the trouble of making a second trip to the store.
  3. The best white wine for seafood is one that can be readily coupled with the sort of fish being served.
  4. Meaty and highly flavorful, with a lean and flaky texture and a medium texture.
  5. This includes fish such as sea bass, flounder, sole, tilapia, and branzino, among others.
  6. Choose from a variety of wines such as Pinot Grigio, Champagne, Cava, Sauvignon Blanc, and Unoaked Chardonnay, just to mention a few examples.
  7. Even though this class of fish is flaky, the texture of the flesh is thicker and harder than the last class of fish described earlier in this article.
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Catfish, snapper, grouper, black cod, and halibut are some of the species that fall within this category.

For instance, Chardonnay, California Sauvignon Blanc, Rioja, Dry Riesling, and Pinot Gris are all excellent choices.

Although it is crucial to consider the sauce and side dishes when selecting a halibut wine match, if I had to pick one wine that would be the most likely to pair well with halibut, I would choose California Sauvignon Blanc, which is a light white wine from the state of California.

Swordfish, tuna, salmon, and mahi mahi are just a few of the options available.

Because this fish is very meaty, we recommend complementing it with full-flavored white wines, or maybe some flowers for a special occasion.

Exceptionally flavorful Fish with a strong flavor have a distinct taste of the ocean.

Perhaps anchovies, sardines, and uni are on the menu?

Remember that these fish are almost frequently served alongside other highly flavored foods when combining wines with them, which is something to bear in mind when pairing wines with these fish.

Even a red wine would be appropriate in this situation.

With Fish, Red Wine is a good choice.

In the event that you have a strong need for red wine and opt to mix it with fish, you will most likely encounter a metallic taste in your tongue.

While the list above offers recommendations for some of the most common and most popular wine pairings with some of the most popular seafood dishes, we strongly advise you to experiment on your own and find the wine that best suits your own palate and preferences.

Now that you’ve mastered the art of wine and fish pairing, you may advance to the next level by earning additional knowledge about pairing fish and wine as your next conquest.

Pairing Wine with Fish

Find out which wines go best with each of the four types of fin fish in this article. There are a variety of possible wine pairings for fish, ranging from flaky tilapia to steak-like swordfish. When it comes to combining wine with fish, there are a variety of factors to consider, including the sauce and the way the fish is prepared.

Guide to Pairing Wine with Fish

As a general rule, white wines go best with fish. But there are exceptions. Why not a glass of red wine? Red wines include greater concentrations of tannin, which interacts with fish oils on the tongue to provide a unique flavor experience. In the majority of situations, this interaction might leave a metallic aftertaste in your tongue after it has occurred. If you’re planning to serve fish with red wine, look for a wine with low tannin content.

Pairing Based on Type of Fish

Fin fish may be divided into four broad categories based on their texture and flavor. Purchase the book and receive the course! With the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition, you will receive a FREE copy of the Wine 101 Course (a $50 value). Read on to find out more

  1. Fish that is lean and flaky, such as sea bass, etc. Fish with a medium texture, such as trout, arctic char, and others Meaty fish, such as tuna, swordfish, and other varieties
  2. Fish with a strong flavor, such as sardine, herring, and so on

Lean and Flaky Fish

Filets of mildly flavored white fish that are thin and flaky are served. Fish tacos are exactly what we’re referring about if you have ever tasted them before! Sea bass, branzino, black sea bass, flounder, perch, porgy, sole, fluke, tilapia, wild striped bass, pollock, and haddock are just a few of the species available.

Wines with lean and flaky fish

mildly flavored white fish with thin and flaky filets, served in a salad. Fish tacos are exactly what we’re referring about if you have ever tasted them before. Sea bass, branzino, black sea bass, flounder, perch, porgy, sole, fluke, tilapia, wild striped bass, pollock, and haddock are just a few of the species that may be found in the ocean.

Medium-Textured Fish

This is still a flaky fish, but it has a stronger and thicker texture than the previous one. Because of their medium texture, these fish are able to withstand the addition of heavier sauces and spices – as well as wine! Trout, arctic char, catfish, red snapper, grouper, skate, code, hake, black fish, haddock, redfish, halibut, black cod (sablefish), monkfish, chilean seabass, and escobar are some examples of the fish that may be found in the ocean.

Wines with medium-textured fish

Look for medium-bodied whites with strong aromatics, as well as full-bodied whites that have been matured in oak barrels. Chardonnay California Sauvignon Blanc is a kind of white wine that is grown in California. New Zealand is a country in the Pacific Ocean. Sauvignon Blanc is a kind of white wine that is grown in California. White Rioja Sémillon Try a dry Chenin Blanc (South Afica is a good choice!). Fiano is an Italian word that means “feet” in English (Italy) Moschofilero is a term used to describe a person who collects moschofilero (Greece) Vermentino is a kind of red wine (Italy) Riesling with a dry finish (Washington) Pinot Gris (Pinot Grigio) (Willamette Valley) Pinot Gris (Pinot Grigio) (Alsace) Garganega is a kind of plant that grows in the Garganega genus (Soave)

Meaty Fish

There are several types of fish that are firm and meaty in texture, having a steak-like feel.

Examples include tuna (bluefish), salmon (salmonella), mackerel (mahi mahi), shark (monkfish), and swordfish.

Wine with meaty fish

White wines with a lot of taste, as well as a few red and rosé wines, are all available. Vintage ChampagneViognier White BurgundyDry Rosé Italian ChardonnayMarsanneRoussanneGrenache Blanc Falanghina Oaked ChardonnayViognier Vintage ChampagneWhite BurgundyDry Rosé (Italy)

Strongly Flavored Fish

Rich, flavorful white wines, as well as a few red and rosé wines, are available. Vintage ChampagneViognierWhite BurgundyDry Rosé Italian ChardonnayMarsanneRoussanneGrenache Blanc FalanghinaOaked ChardonnayViognier Vintage ChampagneWhite BurgundyDry Rosé (Italy)

Wine with strongly flavored fish

When you start cooking with anchovies and other intensely flavored seafood, something interesting happens in the background. The level of intensity increases significantly. For example, a thick Italian-style pizza topped with salty-tangy anchovies is a delicious option. Normally, white wine would be the wine of choice to pair with fish, but in this case, a red wine would be preferable! Champagne Lambrusco CrémantDry (CremantDry Lambrusco) RoséDry Rosé is a rosé that is made from grapes that are not fermented.

GamayCavaGrenache Blanc is a white wine made from grapes grown in France.

Fish PreparationsSauces

Beurre Blanc, lemon, lime, and vinegar-based sauces are some of the most popular. Wines with lighter, zestier flavors and those with more herbal and savory qualities, such as Sauvignon Blanc, Muscadet, Cortese di Gavi, Verdejo, Vinho Verde, White Bordeaux, and Grenache Blanc, are recommended.

Sweet Sauces with Wine

Pineapple, Mango, Orange, Teriyaki, Sweet and Sour, and other tropical fruits Look for wines that have a slight hint of sweetness that complement the sauce. It is recommended that your rosé should be as dark as possible in comparison to the sauce. For example, teriyaki chicken with Lambrusco or Meyer lemon glazed fish with Spätlese Riesling are also delicious options.

Spicy Sauces with Wine

Pineapple, Mango, Orange, Teriyaki, Sweet and Sour, and other tropical fruits and vegetables. To complement the sauce, look for wines that have a bit more sweetness to them. It is recommended that your rosé be as dark as possible in color to match the sauce. For example, Teriyaki with Lambrusco or Meyer lemon glazed fish with Spätlese Riesling are both delicious pairings.

Curry Sauces with Wine

Thai Curry, Indian Curry, and other regional cuisines In order to balance the sweetness of the curry sauce and the spices in it, sweet wines such as Riesling, Moscato, Gewürztraminer, and Prosecco should be served with it.

Fish Tacos with Wine

Grüner Veltliner, Muscadet, and Champagne are all excellent pairings for fish tacos.

Herb Sauces with Wine

When coupled with green herbs such as basil, parsley, mint, cilantro, dill, capers, and cucumber, wines with herbaceous overtones have a rich flowery flavor. Look for Sauvignon Blanc, Chablis, Grenache Blanc, Torrontés, and Trebbiano, among other varieties.

Smoked Salmon or Trout with Wine

Pairing green herbs with wines with herbaceous characteristics such as basil or parsley or mint or cilantro or dill or capers or cucumber brings out the flowery flavor of the wine.

Pay attention to Sauvignon Blanc, Chablis, Grenache Blanc, Torrontés, and Trebbiano, among other varieties.

Raw Fish with Wine

Try a variety of sparkling wines and bone dry white wines such as Muscadet, Assyrtiko, Vinho Verde, Albario, Dry Furmint (Tokaji), and Ugni Blanc to get a feel for what you enjoy (aka Trebbiano).

Pair Wine and Food Everyday

Live the wine lifestyle to the fullest. Make excellent meal and wine pairings with the help of this chart. Purchase a Poster

What Wines Go With Fish? 10 Amazing Pairings

There is a widely held belief that the finest wine to pair with fish is a young, fresh white wine that has not been aged. Despite being widely held in the past, this concept has fallen out of favor, and many connoisseurs and sommeliers of the world’s most prestigious restaurants now understand that fish may be matched with a broad variety of young and old wines. But, after all, what kinds of wines go well with fish? The current trend in food and wine matching asserts that the individual has a complete understanding of each wine and how it may be used to compliment each cuisine.

What emerges is that fish works exceptionally well with rosé wines, sparkling whites, and an amazing array of red wines, in addition to the typical white options.

1 Sauvignon Blanc

There is no doubt that Sauvignon Blanc is a traditional choice to make for your next party or family meal if you want to play it safe. This beautiful wine is best enjoyed while it is young and goes very well with low-fat seafood such as sea bass or sea bream. Although the wine has a light and fresh sensation, the delicate nature of the wine allows it to compliment, rather than hide, the delicate nature of the fish. You can offer a delicate fish soup, or you can grill or even steam your fish meal, depending on your preference for preparation method.

2 Chardonnay

No question, if you want to keep things simple for your next party or family meal, Sauvignon Blanc is a great option. Sea bass or sea bream are excellent choices for pairing with this beautiful wine, which is best served young. In contrast to the delicate taste of the fish, the wine has a light and fresh sensation, which allows it to compliment rather than mask its delicate flavor. You can offer a delicate fish soup, or you can grill or steam your fish meal, depending on your preference.

3 Sparkling Wine

A sparkling wine is perhaps the most adaptable pairing to experiment with when cooking with a range of fish and seafood-based meals. The goal is to locate a wine that is somewhat effervescent but not too bubbly, with a delicate fizz rather than noticeable bubbles. It is particularly well-suited to the delicate tastes of shrimp, lobsters, crab, mantis shrimp, and prawns, but it also goes well with white and blue fish.

The greatest wine to pair with fatty fish like salmon, but also with shellfish like mussels, clams, and oysters, may be a frothy effervescent wine such as Prosecco or Champagne.

4 Rosé Wine

Sushi and sashimi, as well as other oriental fish dishes, are notoriously difficult to match with wine. According to traditional Japanese thought, a meal consists of five essential components: sweetness, saltiness, bitterness, sourness, and umami (savory flavor). This last component is unique to Oriental cuisine and is strengthened, when it comes to fish, by a rich beverage, such as a rosé wine, which complements the meal. The rosé wine has the vivacity of a white and the richness of a red, making it a versatile wine that can be enjoyed with a variety of hot and less spicy foods.

5 Pinot Gris

Sushi and sashimi, as well as other oriental fish dishes, are notoriously difficult to match with fine wines. Japan believes that a food includes five essential components: sweetness, saltiness, bitterness, sourness, and umami (which means “five flavors” in Japanese). If you’re eating fish, a rich beverage like a rosé wine can accentuate the flavor of this last component, which is unique to Oriental meals. The rosé wine combines the vivacity of a white and the richness of a red, making it a versatile wine that can be enjoyed with a variety of hot and less spicy foods alike.

6 Pinot Noir

While we’re on the subject of Pinot, we may move on to a red. Yes, you are correct in your assumption. It is not the most common pairing to serve red wine with fish. Choosing a red wine to accompany your fish may even cause your less well-versed companions to make disparaging remarks about your lack of culinary expertise. And this is where you may come in and explain how a red wine might improve the flavor of a fatty fish like tuna or salmon. Pinot Noir, in fact, is an excellent match for fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, trout, herring, and sardines, to name a few examples.

7 Vermentino

Returning to the white wine option, another beautiful combination is represented by the Vermentino, a magnificent Italian wine produced mostly in the Maremma area of Tuscany, but also in Sardinia and other regions of the Mediterranean region. Distinguished by a strong flavor and a long aftertaste, the wine is produced by combining the unique climatic conditions of both regions with the unique terroir of each region. A unique blend of fruity scents and definite sapidity is created, and your visitors will be pleasantly surprised.

8 Frappato

From Tuscany to Sicily, Italy’s astonishing selection of wines that pair well with fish continues to astound. Frappato, a Sicilian distilled wine created in the region of Ragusa, is one of the most startling examples.

This wine, made from black grapes and distinguished by a distinct scent as well as great tastes that are difficult to forget, goes very well with sushi and sashimi, as well as with other raw fish meals.

9 Chianti Classic

In addition to the Chianti Classic, another red wine that has made it onto this list is the Chianti Classic, which proves that reds and fish are a more than excellent pairing. This delicate red wine has a smooth tannin structure and is a great match for blue fish such as cod and sardines, among other things.

10 Sangiovese

The last wine on our list is a red Sangiovese, the prince of Tuscany with a soul who, when vinified with an eye toward freshness and fruitiness, may be used to pair with a wide variety of seafood meals. In addition to classic Livorno-style cod meals, Sangiovese is a fantastic match for raw sardines and other richer fish dishes. Pair it with grilled or baked salmon, red tuna, or kippers for a delicious meal. Furthermore, a non-vintage Sangiovese brings out the subtle flavors of fish soup or risotto with shellfish when served with it.

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What is certain is that you now understand which wines pair well with fish, allowing you to surprise your friends and family.

Pairing wine with fish: What to choose

Pescatarians are frequently spoilt for choice, whether they are dining out or preparing meals at home. Fishermen enjoy a broad variety of species, and fish is a flexible food that can be prepared in a variety of ways – and even eaten raw – to suit individual tastes. This means that you’ll be able to choose from a wide variety of varietals and wine types to combine with your seafood. While tradition suggests that white wine should always be served with fish, red wine, as well as rosé, may also be an excellent complement in specific circumstances.

The importance of texture and flavor cannot be overstated.

  • Plaice, sole, and perch are examples of mild fish that are lean and flaky. Trout, seabass, haddock, and cod are examples of medium-textured fish. Salmon, tuna, monkfish, and swordfish are examples of meaty fish. Fish with strong flavors such as herring, mackerel, sardines, and anchovies

There are certain broad criteria that apply to all of these categories. White fish fillets should be served with a lighter white wine, such as Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris, Albarino, or Grüner Veltiner, to complement their delicate flavor. Meanwhile, meatier fish such as tuna may hold up to more strong flavors such as Chardonnay, Viognier, or Rosé that have been soaked. Nevertheless, the method of preparation of the fish – grilling, baking, frying, or barbecuing – will aid in narrowing down your wine selection.

A wine with strong acidity will be required to accompany fish served with a creamy sauce, for example, in order to cleanse the palate between portions.

White, flaky fish fillets

Plaice, sole, and tilapia, which are delicate and mild-flavored fish, may be cooked fast and easily by grilling or baking them, then serving them simply with lemon and herbs on the side. Italian whites are a great accompaniment for this dish. In addition to the perennially popular Pinot Grigio, search for varieties such as Vermentino, Fiano, and Grillo, which produce wines that are crisp and lemony. Island whites from Sicily and Sardinia may have a fresh saline taste to them that pairs nicely with simply grilled seafood as well as other dishes.

Consider the Portuguese Vinho Verde, which is made from the Alvarinho grape, or the Spanish Albario, which comes from the Ras Baixas region.

Wines like Assyrtiko, which have a high natural acidity, pair nicely with delicate white fish that has been cooked in creamy sauces or butter.

As far as classic pairings are concerned, grilled lemon sole or Dover sole meunière pair beautifully with a superb white Burgundy that has been slightly aged (fried in butter with a dusting of flour).

Textured white fish

Ocean-dwelling fish such as cod, halibut, haddock, and sea bass can all be classified as flaky white fish, but because they have larger flakes and a more robust texture, they are more often used in dishes that feature richer sauces, spices, and strongly flavoured herbs than other types of white fish. This implies that you may choose a more robust white wine, perhaps one that has been aged in wood or in bottles. Try wines such as old White Rioja or Loire Valley Chenin Blanc to get a feel for the region.

  1. Similar to spicyfish tacos, consider an aromatic Austrian Grüner Veltliner or German Riesling – again, with a hint of sweetness to moderate the heat – to pair with them.
  2. Herbs such as dill, tarragon, parsley, chives, marjoram, and lemongrass, among others, are very effective when used in conjunction with fish.
  3. Sauvignon Blanc – whether in the form of fresh, citrus variants from New Zealand or more restrained herbaceous kinds from the Loire Valley – is a dependable choice for any occasion.
  4. It’s best to drink Alvarinho/Albario or a crisp Sauvignon Blanc from Chile or New Zealand for this dish.
  5. When it comes to decadence, a white de blancs Champagne ticks all of the boxes.

Meaty and pink fish

With fish that has a meatier texture – such as swordfish or monkfish – as well as pink-fleshed fishes like tuna and salmon, the selection of wine styles to pick from expands, since rosés and lighter reds will frequently match better with these types of fish than white wines. Using the example of a chilled New World Pinot Noir, it would go as well with seared tuna or seared salmon. Dryrosésgo particularly well with all types of salmon recipes – and you don’t have to limit yourself to still wines to do so.

  • BBQ salmon pairs well with a fruity rosé Champagne, which can stand up to the chargrilled flavors of the fish.
  • When it comes to combining salmon with wine, there are a variety of alternatives to choose from.
  • Tuna meals may be paired with a variety of different foods.
  • Tuna ceviche or carpaccio, on the other hand, call for crisp citrus whites like as Picpoul de Pinet or Chardonnay from cool-climate regions.
  • Meaty fishes are frequently seen in more powerfully spiced Indian cuisine – with dishes like as astandoor-grilled monkfish–as well as Caribbean and Thai curries, among other places.

Focus on wine styles that pair well with spicy foods in this situation since the mix of spices and heat of the meal are just as significant as the texture and flavor of the fish.

Fish with strong flavours

When it comes to oily fish, such as mackerel, herring, and sardines, they have powerful flavors of the sea and require a crisp, bracing wine to complement them. Many white (such as Portugal’s Vinho Verde), rosé (such as Provence), and red (such as Gamay-based wines that may be served cold for an additional bite) alternatives are available. Fish with a strong flavor is typically grilled simply on the grill or barbecue – after all, it doesn’t require much assistance to improve its flavor – and served simply with a touch of lemon or herbs.

Tapas-style Mediterranean anchovies go perfectly with Iberian whites such as Alvarinho, Albario, Verdejo, Txakoli, and salty fino or manzanilla sherries.

Italian reds such as Bardolino and Valpolicella, as well as Spanish reds derived from the Menca grape, are excellent choices.

See also:

One of the characteristics that distinguishes shellfish from other types of cuisine is its versatility. Not only is there a diverse selection of species available, but it may also be prepared in a variety of ways. You may grill it, roast it, poach it, or even eat it raw if you want to be creative. Many foods may be kept simple, or they can be topped with a buttery cream sauce or a rich, spicy tomato sauce, for example. Having a glass of wine to accompany a wonderfully cooked seafood meal is the only thing that could possibly make it better (although an ocean view would be pretty nice, too).

While white wines are the traditional go-to choice, they are by no means the sole option.

Our brief recommendations on how to combine wine with seafood, as well as some delicious combinations you should try for your next ocean-inspired meal, will be provided in this section.

Tips for Pairing Wines With Seafood

Because fish and shellfish are such adaptable foods, a wide range of wines will pair nicely with a variety of different recipes. Tradition dictates that white wine should be served with seafood, although red wines may also be a good match in some situations, such as when grilling. When it comes to combining wine and seafood, the type of fish or shellfish you choose, as well as how you prepare it, are important considerations. Texture and taste are important aspects to bear in mind while creating a dish.

More robust wines, such as oaked Chardonnay, pair nicely with meatier varieties of fish and shellfish.

Seafood served in a cream sauce necessitates the use of an acidic wine to aid in cutting through the fat and cleansing the palate of the dish.

When it comes to combining red wines with seafood, you must take into account the way the meal is prepared, the sauce used – if any – and the ingredients that are served alongside it.

You’ll want to avoid mixing tannins with acidity because doing so might result in a metallic feeling in the tongue. If you want to drink red wine with your seafood dish, stay away from dishes that contain a squeeze of lemon or a lemon-based sauce and choose for a red wine with moderate tannins.

Caviar and Champagne

Champagne and caviar is one of the most remarkable wine and seafood combos available. A dry Champagne pairs well with caviar because of the high oil, fat, and salt content of the fish, resulting in a fantastic taste experience while also clearing the palette. Even if sparkling wines aren’t your style, a herbaceous or lemony Sauvignon Blanc is a delicious alternative.

Crab Cakes and Sauvignon Blanc

The dish of crab cakes is a favorite of many seafood enthusiasts. They’re somewhat sweet, crispy, and herbaceous, whether they’re fried or baked. Typically, a cream-based sauce, such as remoulade or tartar sauce, is served alongside these delectable burger patties. With its fresh acidity, a Sauvignon Blanc cuts through the fat of the meal while enhancing the taste of the meat. Alternatively, a fruity, floralViognier would be a lovely accompaniment to this meal.

Sea Bass and Pinot Gris

Among seafood enthusiasts, crab cakes are a beloved dish. They’re somewhat sweet, crisp, and herbaceous, whether fried or baked. A cream-based sauce, such as remoulade or tartar sauce, is typically served alongside these excellent burgers. With its fresh acidity, a Sauvignon Blanc cuts through the fat of the meal and brings out the flavors of the meat. Alternatively, a fruity, floralViognier would be a lovely accompaniment to this meal.

Lobster and Chardonnay

Lobster is considered to be one of the most luxurious varieties of seafood available. It’s also a dish that may be prepared in a variety of various ways. Chardonnayis unquestionably the best wine to serve with lobster, no matter how you prepare it: baked, broil, grill, or steam. It is also the most versatile wine to offer with lobster. If you serve the wine with a cream sauce or a sprinkling of butter, it will taste even better. You don’t have to limit yourself to Chardonnay in this case. Lobster pairs well with a variety of white wines, including Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Gerwürztraminer.

Tuna and Rosé

Believe it or not, tuna and red wine is a classic French match that dates back centuries. After just one bite, you’ll understand why so many people are drawn to this particular mix. In comparison to other types of fish, tuna is a meatier fish with a more strong taste than other species. Rosé cuts through the richness and meatiness of the meal, refreshing the palate with every sip. The lovely pink hue of a perfectly cooked tuna steak and the corresponding pink color of the wine contributes to the perfection of the paring.

Salmon and Pinot Noir

Truly, tuna and rose are a classic French match, whether you believe it or not! It just takes one bite to see why this combo is so popular among food lovers. In comparison to other types of fish, tuna has a meatier texture and a more robust flavor than salmon.

With each sip, the rosé cleanses the tongue of any remaining meatiness and fat. The lovely pink hue of a perfectly cooked tuna steak and the matching pink color of the wine contributes to the perfection of the combination as well.

Sardines and Nebbiolo

Sardines are a kind of oily fish with a strong taste. As a result, they can hold their own against a stronger, more tannic wine like Nebbiolo. The tannins in the wine allow the taste of the fish to be released from the fat of the fish. Meanwhile, the fat from the fish helps to soften the astringency of the wine, enabling the other aspects of the wine to come through more clearly.

Find the Perfect Wine Pairing for Your Next Seafood Dish

Seafood is a protein that may be used in a variety of ways. There are a variety of species available, each of which may be prepared in a variety of ways. Not only that, but when it comes to pairing your cuisine with the right bottle of wine, you have a plethora of possibilities. What’s great about seafood is that it can be prepared in a variety of ways. You aren’t confined to just white fish. Many foods, as well as red wines, are very well-suited to each other. Whatever type of seafood dish you want to serve at your next dinner party, JJ Buckley Fine Wines has the ideal bottle of wine to go with it.

If you’re unclear about the option to choose, ourconsultancy service is available to assist you.

Pairing Wine With Seafood and Fish: Which Wine to Choose

In terms of protein sources, seafood has an incredible amount of variety to offer. The species available to you can be prepared in a variety of ways, according on your preference. Not only that, but when it comes to pairing the ideal glass of wine with your meal, you have a plethora of possibilities. It’s a great thing about seafood being so varied that you’re not confined to just white fish. The same can be said for many foods when it comes to pairing red wines. What ever type of seafood dish you want to serve at your next dinner party, JJ Buckley Fine Wines has the right bottle of wine to go with your feast.

We provide a consultation service to assist you if you are unclear on what you should choose.

Best Wine to Pair With Salmon

A popular type of fish, salmon is often served at dinner parties and is perhaps one of the most popular choices available today. The style in which you serve it will be determined by the sort of wine you offer with your fish. It’s also worth mentioning that salmon is one of the fish that defies the conventional wisdom about what other fish should taste like and combines very well with a light-bodied red wine. Salmon cooked in a skillet or in the oven is a fantastic match for a chilled Pinot Noir.

Despite this, smoked salmon, because of its strong characteristics, pairs well with a bottle of sparkling wine (such as champagne) or a bottle of sweet wine, such as a Riesling.

Best Wine to Pair With Sushi

If you’re hosting a dinner party, salmon is unquestionably one of the most popular types of fish. Depending on the sort of wine you serve with your salmon, the presentation may vary. Additionally, salmon is one of the fish that defies conventional wisdom about what other fish should taste like, and it matches very well with a light-bodied red wine. With a chilled Pinot Noir, a pan- or oven-cooked fish is a perfect match!

A Chardonnay, on the other hand, is the ideal dry white wine for salmon. A bottle of sparkling wine (such as champagne) or a bottle of sweet wine (such as Riesling) is a better pairing with smoked salmon, due to its strong tastes.

Best Wine to Pair With Scallops

Once again, this is dependent on the method in which the scallops have been prepared and cooked. Riesling is the ideal wine to pair with raw scallops or scallops that have been “cooked” in a ceviche style (with lemon or lime juice). If you want your seafood spicy (as ceviche is intended to be), you may match it with a Moscato instead of Riesling. In contrast, a full-bodied white wine such as Chardonnay or Chenin Blanc will pair best with seared scallops because it will complement both the texture and the bold flavor of the scallops without overpowering them (you run a serious risk of doing so if you choose a bottle that is light or medium-bodied in body).

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Can You Pair Red Wine with Seafood Pasta?

Although it may appear strange, this coupling has the potential to be quite effective. Seafood pasta may be either a Spanish meal (as is more common) or a cuisine from the shores of Italy, depending on where you live. Wine and food should always be paired according to the location in which the dish was born. This is especially true when it comes to dishes like seafood spaghetti. So, if you are making seafood pasta with a Spanish flavour, you should consider pairing it with a bottle of Spanish wine, preferably from the country’s coastal regions.

The most essential thing to remember about this pairing is that the areas should be as similar as possible.

Best Wine to Pair With Lobster

Even though it appears to be a strange match, it has the potential to be extremely successful. Either a Spanish meal (which is more common) or an Italian dish (which comes from the beaches of Italy) can be prepared using seafood pasta. Wine and food should always be paired according to the location in which the meal was born. This is especially true when it comes to seafood pasta. So, if you are making seafood pasta with a Spanish flavour, you should consider pairing it with a bottle of Spanish wine, preferably from the country’s coastal areas.

In this combination, it is critical that the areas match up as closely as you possibly can.

Best Wine to Pair With Haddock

Haddock, at least in the United Kingdom, is a highly popular fish to eat fresh. It’s light, flaky, and bursting with flavor from the garden. So, what is the finest wine to serve with haddock? Pair it with a light and refreshing white wine such as a Pinot Grigio or a Sauvignon Blanc to enhance the flavor. These wines are crisp enough to cut through the protein in the fish while also providing a delightful citrus bite to the meal. Haddock does not combine well with red wines because of its characteristics (light, flaky, and exquisitely fresh), and even the lightest-bodied reds run the danger of overwhelming such a delicate piece of fish.

Best White Wine to Pair With Fish

Chardonnay is the finest white wine to pair with fish since it is versatile and can be served with a variety of dishes. However, lighter wines would match much better with delicate white fish combinations such as cod, haddock, and halibut, which are more delicate in nature. While Chardonnay is a full-bodied white wine, and while the buttery notes of this wine would compliment the butteriness of the fish, a lighter and crisper white wine, such as a Pinot Grigio or a Sauvignon Blanc, would be a better accompaniment for delicate fish like salmon.

With these sorts of fish, you can experiment a bit more with the wines, moving away from the light-bodied whites and exploring into light-bodied reds like a (chilled) Pinot Noir and full-bodied whites like Chardonnay.

Best Wine to Pair With Tuna Tartare

Tuna Tartare works really well with wines that are meant to be served with heavier fish, thus a light-bodied red wine such as a light Burgundy or Pinot Noir would be an excellent pairing. Another option is to use a full-bodied dry white wine, which will create a different sort of flavor palate that will compliment the herbs that have been utilized during the cooking process.

Best Wine to Pair with Cioppino

Cioppino is an Italian seafood stew that originated in San Francisco, California, and was made by Italian immigrants. You may anticipate it to match nicely with white wines, particularly fuller-bodied wines such as Friulano, Zinfandel, or Chardonnay, due to the nature of the dish being shellfish. This combo is possible because of the shellfish and the texture of the shellfish within the shellfish. The fact that the meal is influenced by Italian cuisine means that the ideal wine matches will be Italian wines, particularly full-bodied white wines, as previously noted.

Best Wine to Pair with Shrimp Cocktail

If you use a horseradish sauce to make your shrimp cocktail, you have more freedom to experiment with the tastes than you would with a regular fish or shrimp meal. Because of the strong flavor of the horseradish, you may want to match it with something sweet (such as a Riesling) to cut through the spiciness of the horseradish; alternatively, you may work with the tomato and pair it with a fruitier merlot to complement the tomato.

Red Wine that Goes with Seafood

With or without sauce, it’s probable that the best wines to pair with your seafood will be full-bodied whites such as Chardonnay (which is known for its buttery qualities), Viognier, or Muscat. This is due to the fact that shellfish has a rather thick and highly buttery texture and flavor, which a full-bodied white wine would ideally compliment and enhance. Light-bodied red wines such as Pinot Noir or Zinfandel that have been gently cooled are the greatest matches with seafood, if you prefer a bottle of red wine instead.

This is terrible for both the dish and the drink.

Best Wine to Pair With Crab Legs

The type of wine to serve with crab legs is determined on how you want to prepare the crab legs. The Chardonnay is, of course, a good all-arounder, but if you want to try to get a little more out of your wine, look for something with a little more fruit in the blend. The crab legs should be served with a lemon dressing, and the wine should be Pinot Grigio to bring out the citrus flavors in both. In contrast, if you want to serve the crab legs warm, a Riesling will be a good choice since it will bring out the inherent sweetness in both the meal and the wine.

Best Wine to Pair With Octopus

The wine to serve with crab legs is determined on how you want to prepare the crab legs. The Chardonnay is, of course, a great all-arounder, but if you want to try to get a little more out of your wine, look for something with a little more fruit in the blend. Pour a glass of Pinot Grigio with the crab legs if you’re serving them with a lemon dressing to really bring out the citrus flavors in both.

If, on the other hand, you want to serve the crab legs warm, a Riesling will be a good choice since it will bring out the inherent sweetness in both the meal and wine.

Best Wine to Pair With Steak and Shrimp

Choosing a wine to pair with crab legs is dependent on how you want to prepare the crabs. The Chardonnay is, of course, a good all-arounder, but if you want to try and get a little more out of your wine, look for something with a little more fruit. The crab legs should be served with a lemon dressing, and the wine should be Pinot Grigio to bring out the citrus notes in both. However, if you want to serve the crab legs warm, a Riesling will be a good choice since it will bring out the inherent sweetness in both the meal and the wine.

Best Wine to Pair with Sea Bass

Although sea bass appears to fit into the category of’meaty’ fish, with tuna and salmon, its mild flavor prevents it from joining the group. Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio are two of the greatest wines to pair with it since they are both vibrant whites with loads of flavors. They are also inexpensive. This will allow your palate to taste a plethora of flavors rather than simply the fish alone, and will help to avoid the meal from becoming underwhelming.

Best Wine to Pair With Fish Pie

It doesn’t really matter whether your pie is covered with pastry or potatoes; the major taste of this meal comes from the creamy fish beneath the dough. Based on the tastes and textures present in this dish, we can conclude that a solid, full-bodied white wine would be an excellent pairing with this dish. Try to avoid warmer climate Chardonnayes in favor of the buttery Chardonnays, since cooler temperature Chardonnay will add more zest to your meal and bring all of the tastes together well. Any full-bodied dry white wine would do nicely for a fish pie pairing if Chardonnay isn’t your preference.

Final Notes

Because the major taste of this meal comes from the creamy fish below, it doesn’t matter whether your pie is covered with pastry or with potatoes. A excellent, full-bodied white wine would be a fantastic compliment to this meal, if we consider both the tastes and the textures that are there. It is possible to choose a buttery Chardonnay, but it is best to avoid the warmer climate Chardonnays, as cooler temperature Chardonnay will add more zest to your meal and bring all of the flavors together well.

A great bottle of sparkling wine will also do nicely for a fish pie match.

What wines go well with fish?

In order to comprehend wine matching, you must first grasp the structure of the beverage. Every wine has its own unique set of qualities, including its alcohol content, sweetness, tannin, and acidity. When you conceive about wine qualities as “taste” elements, it becomes much easier to combine them with different types of foods. ChefKurt from Thomas Hill Organics was kind enough to guest blog for us and share his wine matching knowledge with us.

What Type of Wine to Pair with Fish – Red or White?

Generally speaking, when it comes to choosing a wine that works well with fish, it is best to stay with whites. Because of the more abrasive tannins inherent in red wines, red wines tend to match better with red meats than white wines. When a sauce is used in the dish, this rule of thumb can be broken.For example, a bold red wine with aggressive tannins would pair well with slow-cooked meats like braised short ribs.Also, meat cooked in a sweet marinade, such as barbecued ribs, will enhance the acidity of the wine, making it taste fresher.To pair red wine with fish, look for something with lower tannins, such as a lively Grenache or a soft Pinot Noir Also, a sweet fresh tomato and fennel sauce will stand up to the lighter reds in this group.

What Type of Fish to Pair with White Wines

Generally speaking, when it comes to choosing a wine that pairs well with fish, it is best to stay with whites. Because of the more abrasive tannins present in red wines, red wines tend to match better with red foods. However, if the dish includes a sauce, this way of thinking may need to be adjusted.For example, a bold red wine with aggressive tannins would pair well with slow-cooked meats like braised short ribs.Also, meat cooked with a sweet marinade, such as barbecued ribs, will enhance the acidity of the wine, making it taste fresher.To pair red wine with fish, look for something with lower tannins, such as a lively Grenache or a Also, a delicious fresh tomato and fennel sauce will stand up to the lightness of these reds.

Examples:

  • When it comes to choosing a wine to pair with fish, it is typically best to stick with whites. Because red wines have more harsh tannins than white wines, they tend to match well with red meats. However, if the dish includes a sauce, this way of thinking can be flipped.For example, a bold red wine with aggressive tannins would pair well with slow-cooked meats like braised short ribs.Also, meat cooked with a sweet marinade, such as barbecued ribs, will enhance the acidity of the wine, making it taste fresher.To pair red wine with fish, look for something with lower tannins, such as a lively Grenache or a soft Also, a delicious fresh tomato and fennel sauce will stand up to the lighter reds in this collection.

Wine – crisp, light whites such as Sauvignon Blanc and Vermentino, as well as a crisp Grenache Blanc and a dry Rosé. The Paso Wine Pairing consists of Baja fish tacos and Shale Oak Rosé.

  • Vino: Sauvignon Blanc, Vermentino, a crisp Grenache Blanc, and a dry Rosé are examples of crisp, fresh white wines. Paired with Shale Oak Rosé, these Baja fish tacos are a must-try.

The following wines have a medium body and powerful aromatics: Albario, Chenin Blanc, Viognier, and a lively Paso mix Food and wine pairing in Paso Robles: pan-roasted lemon caper halibut withBarr Estate, Albarinos

  • Tuna, swordfish, salmon, and other firm and meaty steak-like fish

Wine — a full-flavored white with a lot of body and flavor: Roussanne, Marsanne, Malvasia Bianca, Chardonnay, and a Rhône mix are among the varieties used. Paso Wine Pairing: grilled Mediterranean swordfish with Tablas Creek Vineyard, Tablas Blanc from the Paso Robles region.

  • Anchovies, sandiness, and mackerel are examples of robust fish with powerful flavor.

Wine – dry with a light body and effervescent: Sparkling, Grenache Blanc, Vermentino, Dry RoséPaso Wine Pairing– wood-fired sausage and anchovy pizza with Michael Gill Cellars, VermentinoPaso Wine Pairing– grilled chicken with Michael Gill Cellars, VermentinoPaso Wine Pairing– grilled chicken with Michael Gill Cellars, VermentinoPaso Wine Pairing

How Do Sauces Affect the Wine Pairing?

Chardonnay with white fish in a butter sauce would be a good pairing for this dish. In addition, if the fish is served with a soy-based sauce, it would be appropriate to serve the Grenache. Pinot Noir, on the other hand, comes to mind when I think of a mushroom sauce. Salmon is also a good pairing with Pinot Noir. Because ahi tuna is so substantial, it can even be served with a bolder red wine such as Tempranillo. Thomas Hill Organics and Paso Robles Wine Pairing Thai Salmon with TH Estate, SkinsSauce has a huge impact on the outcome of a paring because of the sauce.

Wine Pairing With Other Seafood

Other forms of shellfish, such as crab, should be coupled with a white wine that is not very oaky, but rather crisp and acidic in nature. Pretend you’re eating plump crab cakes with a delightful and distinctive Picpoul Blanc to accompany them. Because of the richness of lobster, a full-bodied white wine is recommended. It keeps up well when compared to a Roussanne. Sparkling oysters come to mind whenever I think about oysters. Oysters, on the other hand, come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Their Pacific Gold Oyster pairs perfectly with a glass of Chenin Blanc at their restaurant.

Pair with a light and refreshing white wine, such as an aporch pounder (as we like to call it). EATTO Buccatini with shrimp, Nduja, and tomato served with Giornatail Campo Bianco, a Paso Wine Pairing.

Final Thoughts

In terms of pairing fish with wine, or any wine pairing for that matter, there are several principles and guidelines that may be followed to improve the whole experience. However, this is Paso. where we like to flout all the rules. aPaso Wine is the most crucial guideline to follow no matter what wine you are drinking or matching with your meal. And if fish isn’t your thing, we have a great guide on how to match beef and other meats with it. * Make use of our handy dandyfilter to sort by Paso Robles wine varieties.

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