What Temperature Should Wine Be Stored At? (Best solution)

The perfect temperature depends on various factors, including how much fruit, alcohol, and tannin the wine contains. As a general rule of thumb, wine should be stored around 11-14˚c (52-57°F).

What is the best temperature for wine storage?

  • Tom Stevenson speculates that 52 °F (11 °C) may be the most ideal temperature for storage and aging, while Karen MacNeil recommends keeping wine intended for ageing in a cool area with a constant temperature around 55 °F (13 °C).

Contents

What is the perfect temperature to store wine?

The ideal wine storage temperature is 55 – 59 °F (12 – 15 °C) and 55 – 75% humidity.

What is the correct temperature to store red wine?

Whether you use a wine cellar, a wine cooler, or a wine refrigerator, the degree spectrum typically stays the same. Generally, if you’re storing wines for any length of time, keep both red and white wines at 55° F, but it all really depends on the varietal.

Can wine storage be too cold?

Wine can safely be stored at from 40 to 65 degrees, but the “perfect” temperature really comes down to how long you plan to store the wine. Colder storage temperatures delay this chemical process, slowing the aging of the wine. Conversely, warmer temperatures hasten the process, aging the wines more quickly.

What is the proper way to store wine?

The key takeaway should be to store your wine in a dark and dry place to preserve its great taste. If you can’t keep a bottle entirely out of light, keep it inside of a box or wrapped lightly in cloth. If you opt for a cabinet to age your wine, be sure to select one with solid or UV-resistant doors.

Should red wine be chilled?

According to wine experts, red wine is best served in the range of 55°F–65°F, even though they say that a room temperature bottle is optimal. When red wine is too cold, its flavor becomes dull. But when red wines are too warm, it becomes overbearing with alcohol flavor.

How should you store red wine after opening?

Keep the open wine bottle out of light and stored under room temperature. In most cases, a refrigerator goes a long way to keeping wine for longer, even red wines. When stored at colder temperatures, the chemical processes slow down, including the process of oxidation that takes place when oxygen hits the wine.

Should wine be stored upside down?

Storing your wines horizontally is best. When a bottle is sideways, the wine stays in contact with the cork, keeping it wet so that that cork will not dry out, shrink up and let air get into the wine, causing premature oxidation. Upside down is definitely better than right side up to keep the cork moist.

What temperature will ruin wine?

But wine is best stored between 53–57˚F when intended for aging, and temperatures can range from the mid-40s to mid-60s for service, depending on the wine. Once you creep past 70˚F, wine falls into the danger zone, and is in peril of irreparable damage.

Can I store red wine at 45 degrees?

Ideal Temperature Range for Red Wine Storage The ideal temperature range for storing red wine is between 45°F and 65°F (8°C and 18°C) with the sweet spot of 55°F (12°C). For long-term storage (wines you’ll hold for a year or longer), you’ll want to pay strict attention to maintaining that ideal temperature of 55°F.

Does cold temperature ruin red wine?

Extreme cold is not nearly as bad for wine as extreme heat. Cold slows down the aging process. And even if your wine is fluctuating from the ideal 55° F temperatures down to as low as mid-30s, as long as the fluctuation is happening gradually, it’s not that bad. Wine freezes at around 15° to 20° F.

What temperature do you set a wine cooler?

How do I adjust the temperature on my wine cooler? UP and DOWN triangles with “+” and “-” symbols. Use the button with a triangle pointed up to raise the temperature in 1-degree increments. Use the button with a triangle pointed down to lower the temperature in 1-degree increments.

7 Wine-Storage Basics You Need to Know

Supposedly, you’ve purchased a bottle of wine that you don’t intend to consume straight now. What are you going to do with it now? First and foremost, it’s important to recognize that only a tiny fraction of good wines now available on the market benefit from extended maturation. The majority of wines are best consumed within a few years after their release. If you’re going to purchase wines to be aged, you should seriously consider investing in professional-grade storage, which is a whole different ballgame from home storage.

1. Keep it cool

Heat is the number one enemy of fine wine. Higher temperatures above 70° F will cause a wine to mature more quickly than is often desired. And if the temperature rises much, your wine may get “cooked,” resulting in bland smells and tastes. However, this isn’t an exact science, as the optimal temperature range is between 45° F and 65° F (with 55° F being frequently regarded as being near to perfect). If your wine storage is a couple degrees warmer than normal, don’t be concerned as long as you’re opening the bottles within a few years of when they were first released.

2. But not too cool

Keeping wines in your home refrigerator is OK for up to a couple of months, but it’s not a smart idea for the long haul, according to wine experts. As a result, the average refrigerator temperature falls considerably below 45° F, making it impossible to securely keep perishable items. Additionally, the absence of moisture may cause corks to dry out, allowing air to enter into bottles and ruin the wine. Also, avoid storing your wine in a place where it may freeze (an unheated garage in winter, forgotten for hours in the freezer).

3. Steady as she goes

More essential than worrying about obtaining the ideal temperature of 55° F is avoiding the landmines of quick, excessive, or frequent temperature swings and fluctuations. In addition to the cooked tastes, the expansion and contraction of the liquid inside the bottle may cause the cork to come loose or spill out of the bottle. Make an effort to maintain consistency, but don’t get overly concerned about slight temperature swings; wines may taste worse while in transportation from the winery to the shop.

No one can tell until you open it, and the contents may still be excellent.)

4. Turn the lights off

When it comes to long-term preservation, light, particularly sunshine, might be a potential hazard. The ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun can damage and prematurely age wine. One of the reasons why vintners use tinted glass bottles is to draw attention to their product. They’re similar to wine’s counterpart, sunglasses.

Light from ordinary home bulbs is unlikely to cause damage to the wine itself, but it may cause your labels to fade over time. Because fluorescent bulbs generate extremely little levels of UV light, incandescent bulbs may be a little safer than fluorescent lights.

5. Don’t sweat the humidity

According to conventional knowledge, wines should be kept at a humidity level of 70 percent or above for optimal storage results. According to the notion, dry air will dry out the corks, allowing air to enter the bottle and degrade the wine, causing it to become stale. While it is true that this can happen, it is unlikely that it will happen to you unless you live in a desert or in frigid circumstances. (Or if you’re storing bottles for a period of 10 years or more, but then we’re back to the topic of professional storage).

Extremely moist circumstances, on the other hand, might encourage mold growth.

A dehumidifier can help with this problem.

6. See things sideways

According to conventional knowledge, wines should be kept at a humidity level of 70 percent or above to maintain optimal flavor and quality. According to the notion, dry air will dry out the corks, allowing air to enter the bottle and taint the wine, resulting in a spoiled bottle of wine. While it is true that this can happen, it is unlikely that it will happen to you unless you live in a desert or polar climate. (Or if you’re storing bottles for a period of 10 years or longer, but then we’re back to the topic of professional storage).

As an alternative, mold may thrive in highly moist environments.

The problem can be resolved using a dehumidifier.

7. Not a whole lot of shaking

According to some hypotheses, vibration might cause long-term harm to wine by speeding up the chemical processes that take place in the liquid. There are some serious collectors who are concerned about even the slight vibrations created by electronic equipment, despite the fact that there is little evidence to support their concerns. Significant vibrations might potentially disrupt the sediment in older wines and prevent them from settling, potentially resulting in an unpleasantly gritty taste and texture.

No.

So where should I keep my bottles?

If you don’t have access to a cool, not-too-damp basement that can be used as a cellar, you may make due with some simple racks in a secure location for storing wine. Rule out your kitchen, laundry room, or boiler room, as these areas may be too hot for your wines. Instead, seek for a position that is not directly in line with sunlight streaming in through a window or door. You may also purchase a small wine cooler and adhere to the same criteria as described above: If you store your wine refrigerator in a cool location, it will not have to work as hard, allowing you to save money on your energy cost.

Consider purchasing a stand-alone cooling machine particularly built for wine storage if you have a sufficient dark and stable room that is not too wet or dry, but it is too warm to store wine in your current setup.

When should you consider upgrading your storage conditions?

If a $1,000 cooling unit represents less than 25% of your yearly wine-buying expenditure, it’s time to reevaluate your options more thoroughly.

It’s a good idea to safeguard your investment. Additionally, collectors recommend that you double the bottle capacity of whatever number you’re thinking of. Once you’ve begun gathering wines to drink later, it’s difficult to get yourself out of the habit.

If I want to buy a wine cooler, what should I look for?

In the event that you don’t have access to a cold, but not too wet, basement that may be used as a cellar, you can make due with some simple racks in a secure location. Rule out your kitchen, laundry room, or boiler room, as these areas may be too hot for your wines. Instead, seek for a spot that is not directly in line with sunlight streaming in from a window or other opening in the building. Purchase a small wine cooler and follow the same instructions as above: Because it will not have to work as hard if it is kept in a cool location, you will save money on your energy bill.

  1. Consider purchasing a stand-alone cooling machine made exclusively for wine storage if you have a good dark and sturdy room that is not too wet or dry, but it is too warm.
  2. In what circumstances should you consider upgrading your storage facilities?
  3. If a $1,000 cooling unit represents less than 25% of your yearly wine-buying expenditure, it’s time to reevaluate your options more thoroughly.
  4. The following is another bit of advise from collectors: whichever number you think of when it comes to bottle capacity, double it.
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The Ideal Wine Storage Temperature for White and Red Wine

The majority of wines available on the market are best appreciated within a few years after their release date. Make sure the first sip is worth it by adhering to the first guideline of wine preservation: the appropriate temperature for wine storage. Fortunately, we’ve done the homework for you and put together a complete tutorial on how to properly store your red wine.

1. Find the Perfect Red Wine Storage Temperature

In most cases, the optimal time to drink most wines is within a few years of when they were first released. Take care to adhere to the first guideline of wine storage: keep your wine at its optimal temperature for maximum enjoyment. Unfortunately, we’ve done the job for you and put together a complete tutorial on how to properly store your wine.

2. And Now for Your White Wines

Which brings us to the question of the ideal temperature for white wine storage. The temperatures used for storage and serving are not usually the same. In fact, while reds and whites are served at different degrees, 55°F is the ideal wine temperature for both types of wine when it comes to storage. The temperature at which wine should be stored is not a precise science. So, regardless of whether you’re keeping reds or whites, don’t get too worked up over a few degrees above or below 55°F in your cellar.

After a little pause, we’ll proceed.

3. It’s Possible to Be Too Cool

Are you thinking of storing your wines in the refrigerator this summer? Perishable items are stored in your refrigerator, which is intended for this purpose. This is accomplished by keeping an average temperature of 45°F or below on a daily basis. Wine is perishable, and you don’t really want to treat that expensive bottle of cabernet sauvignon like a carton of milk, do you? If you want to consume a white wine within a few hours of opening it, a brief storage period in the refrigerator is OK.

Are you thinking of storing your wines in the garage for the time being? Keep an eye on the weather conditions in your area. Excessive humidity may have a negative impact on your wines, perhaps spoiling them, whilst colder conditions can harm the wine and may even cause the cork to pop out.

4. Keep It Steady

The ideal wine storage temperature is 55 degrees Fahrenheit, but it’s more important to maintain a steady temperature than to achieve that exact temperature. It is worth noting that the Wine Spectator cites consistency as one of the seven fundamental characteristics of wine preservation. So, what is it about consistency that is so important? Temperature variations that are rapid or excessive might cause your wines to expand and contract. This can cause corks to be pushed out of the bottle or cause them to dry up and fracture, resulting in seepage and a diminished flavor in your wine due to the introduction of air into the bottle.

This is why wine is typically sold in dark bottles, and why champagne is frequently wrapped in tissue paper or light-resistant cellophane to prevent fading.

5. Invest in a Dedicated Wine Storage Facility

You’re probably seeking for a more effective technique to ensure that your red wines mature gracefully. Are you concerned about the security of your collection? It is possible to have complete climate control as well as peace of mind by using a specialised wine storage facility. At Carl’s Wine Vault, we treat each and every bottle with the utmost respect. With a cutting-edge climate control system, our professional storage facility is capable of accommodating all varieties of wines. With our various redundancy systems and stringent security requirements, you can be certain that your collection is in good hands.

The Best Wine Storage Temperature (Wine Temperature Chart)

Wine storage is an important consideration for wine enthusiasts to be aware of, for the simple reason that most wines nowadays are intended to be consumed within a few years of their release. Consequently, the optimal wine storage temperature must be maintained at the latter if one want to maintain the value of the initial sip. It is essential to store wine at the proper temperature to guarantee that the flavor and balance of your wine do not alter. Learn about the proper temperatures to store different types of wine if you don’t want your wine to age prematurely or become spoiled as a result of inadequate storage conditions.

When you’re through reading this article, you’ll know how to avoid significant temperature swings that might harm your wine.

Wine Storage Temperatures Summary Chart

Wine storage is an important consideration for wine enthusiasts to be aware of, for the simple reason that most wines nowadays are intended to be consumed within a few years after release. Consequently, the optimal wine storage temperature must be kept at or below this level in order to maintain the value of the first sip. In order to guarantee that the flavor and balance of your wine do not alter, it is vital to store it at the proper temperature. To avoid having your wine age prematurely or becoming spoiled as a result of improper storage conditions, understanding the proper temperature ranges for different types of wine is critical.

When you’re through reading this article, you’ll know how to avoid significant temperature swings that might harm your wine. The temperature at which wine should be stored is revealed further down in this article.

Type of wine Temperature °F Temperature °C
Shiraz, Grand Cru, Bordeaux, Zinfandel, Carmenere and Ribera del Duer 64 18
Vintage Port, Madeira and Banyulus 66 19
Red Burgundy, Cabernet Sauvignon, Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello, Malbec and Recioto 63 17

Wine storage is an issue that wine enthusiasts should be aware of, if only for the simple reason that most wines nowadays are intended to be consumed within a few years of being produced. Consequently, the optimal wine storage temperature must be maintained at the latter if one want to retain the value of the initial sip. It is essential to store wine at the proper temperature in order to guarantee that the flavor and balance of your wine do not alter. Learn about the proper temperatures to store different types of wine if you don’t want your wine to age prematurely or become spoiled as a result of improper storage conditions.

By the conclusion of this essay, you’ll know how to avoid excessive temperature swings that might harm your wine.

Type of wine Temperature °F Temperature °C
Beaujolais 54 12
Portuguese wines and Young Spanish 55 13
Sherry, Tawny Port and Chinon. 57 14
Light Zinfandels or Chianti 59 15
Young Bordeaux, Merlot, Rioja and Pinot Noir 61 16

Whites that are not wet

Type of wine Temperature °F Temperature °C
Italian Whites, Alsace Riesling, Gruner Veltliner, Pinot Gris, Pouilly Fuissé and Pouilly Fume 46 8
Bordeaux Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc 48 9
White Burgundy and Condrieu 52 11

Wines with a sweet taste

Type of wine Temperature °F Temperature °C
Auslese, Sweet Vouvray, Tavel, Tokaji, White Zinfandel, Sake, Trockenbeerenauslese, Beerenauslese, Icewine and Barsac 45 7
Cava and Asti Spumante 41 5
Vintage Champagne, Sparkling Wine, Muscat’s and New World Riesling 46 8
Non-vintage champagne 43 6

Wine Storage Options

The Wine Trail Along the Coast Before we can discuss the optimal temperatures at which to keep your wine, we must first consider the many alternatives available to consumers for preserving their wines. This allows you to determine whether or not you will be able to obtain the proper temperatures for various wines using the storage options you have available. The following are the three most popular wine storage alternatives that are commonly utilized because of their safety and security.

Wine Cellar

The Wine Trail Along the Coast A wine cellar is a popular and perfect method of keeping your wine bottles since it allows you to manage the temperature and humidity of the environment. The result is a cost-effective solution tailored to the specific needs of each facility or individual’s residence. Wine cellars provide a great deal of freedom in terms of how you arrange your wine bottles based on the location from where they are sourced. French wine, for example, can be divided into regions such as Alsace, Bordeaux, Bourgogne, Loire, and Rhone, among other French regions, and then further subdivided into subregions.

In the event that you gather certain wines, you can arrange them vertically in number order.

Makeshift Closet

The Wine Trail Along the Coast Many wine enthusiasts find that a makeshift wine cellar closet is an excellent storage solution. It is a straightforward and efficient method of keeping and retrieving your wine in little or big quantities, depending on your needs. There are a plethora of options available on the internet for how to organize your wine in a closet cellar. If you’re a regular wine drinker, a wine closet cellar is the ideal solution for you. It is not recommended for long-term storage, however, due to the fact that the improvised wine closet does not have temperature control.

A Wine Refrigerator

The Wine Trail Along the Coast An airtight cabinet or wine refrigerator is an extremely dependable storage solution that can be utilized to keep your wine at the proper serving temperature.

They’re especially well-suited for wine merchants. They are available in a range of forms and sizes, making them appropriate for any wine collection.

Optimal Temperature for Wine Storage

There are temperature guidelines for keeping wine in general, but these are not based on pure science and do not apply to all varieties of wine in all situations. Wine’s ideal serving temperature is determined by a variety of elements, including but not limited to the tannin content of the wine, the percentage of alcohol in the wine, and the amount of fruit present in the wine. Temperatures between 49°F and 57°F, or between 8-11°C, are generally recommended for storing wine. According to general guidelines, you should never allow your wine storage temps to surpass 24 degrees Celsius.

The following table contains the recommended storage temperatures for several varieties of wine.

Full-Bodied Reds

The Wine Trail Along the Coast Red Burgundy, Cabernet Sauvignon, Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello, Malbec, and Recioto are among the full-bodied wines that fall into the first group of full-bodied wines. These wines should be kept at a temperature of 63 degrees Fahrenheit (17 degrees Celsius). Shiraz, Grand Cru, Bordeaux, Zinfandel, Carmenere, and Ribera del Duero are among the numerous full-bodied red wines available, as are Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. In the event that you’re a fan, you should try storing them at a temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celsius).

Light-to-Medium-Bodied Reds

The Wine Trail Along the Coast Other red wines are classified as light to medium-bodied in terms of their body. They include wines such as Beaujolais and others of a similar nature. These should be kept at 54°F (12°C) or lower temperatures to preserve their freshness. The Portuguese wines and the young Spanish type of light to medium red wines that are suggested for storage should be kept at 55°F (13°C) or above. There are several different varieties of light to medium red wines, including Sherry, Tawny Port, and Chinon, which are all made from grapes grown in Spain.

Light Zinfandels and Chianti’s can be stored at 59°F (15°C) if you want a little warmer environment for them.

Dry Whites

The Wine Trail Along the Coast It is true that there are those of us who are true dry whites aficionados. Dry whites are available in a broad range of flavors, and depending on your geographical location, you may be more familiar with some than others. If you choose either option, we’ll share with you the optimal storage temperature for your particular kind of white wine. Take for example, dry white wines such as Italian Whites, Alsace Riesling, Gruner Veltliner, Pinot Gris and Pouilly Fuissé, and Pouilly Fume, to name a few examples.

For those who enjoy Bordeaux Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, and other white wines, keep in mind that the ideal temperature for storing them is 48°F (9°C).

Fully mature Chardonnay, on the other hand, has to be stored at a temperature of 12°C or 54°F.

The same may be said about Graves. While it comes to whites, there are some that are hard to come by and are often overlooked when storing. Among these are White Burgundy and Condrieu, both of which must be kept at a temperature of 52 degrees Fahrenheit (11 degrees Celsius).

Sweet Wines

The sweetness of sweet wines appeals to many people who are seeking for wines with a very low alcohol concentration. The majority of these sweet wines may be kept around 45 degrees Fahrenheit or 7 degrees Celsius. Auslese, Sweet Vouvray, Tavel, Tokaji, White Zinfandel, Sake, Trockenbeerenauslese, Beerenauslese, Icewine, and Barsac are some of the varieties available. Cava and Asti Spumante are two wines that may be kept at temperatures as low as 41°F (5°C), which is extremely low for wine. Vintage Champagne should be stored at 46 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees Celsius), whereas non-vintage Champagne should be stored at 43 degrees Fahrenheit (6 degrees Celsius).

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These are the recommended storage temperatures for the various varieties of red, white, and sweet wines available on the market.

Furthermore, maintaining consistent storage conditions helps guarantee that your wine matures correctly throughout the year.

Ideal Wine Storage Conditions

The Wine Trail Along the Coast When it comes to preserving the quality of your wine during storage, keeping the temperature just right is the most crucial, but it is not the only factor to consider. It is one of a number of storage criteria that must be met with care. In addition to being stored at the proper temperature, wine should be stored in a dark environment with humidity levels below 70%. Wine bottles should be wrapped in a piece of fabric or placed inside a box if light cannot be prevented from entering the storage facility.

It is also important that your wine cellar or cabinet be devoid of harsh, pungent odours.

It is also recommended that you ensure that your storage choice has adequate ventilation in order to eliminate musty aromas.

Moving your wine might result in a reduction in the quality of the wine.

Bonus Tips

At this stage, you should be confident in your ability to preserve any type and amount of wine without harming the quality of the wine. However, keeping the appropriate temperature in mind, here are a few more considerations to keep in mind when storing your wine.

  • The fact is that not all wines improve with age, which is why you must preserve your wine for the appropriate period of time.

Red wines, for example, may be kept for up to ten years under the right conditions.

Fine wines, on the other hand, can be preserved for up to 100 years, depending on the tannin, acid, and sugar content of the wine. White wines, on the other hand, should not be kept for longer than three years, with the exception of a select Chardonnays, which can be kept for up to twenty years.

  • Maintain a horizontal arrangement for your bottles of wine to avoid the cork drying out and eventually shrinking, which might result in air entering and spoiling the wine. Protect the labels on your wine bottles by using cellar sleeves or plastic wrap around them.

Here are some other suggestions for wine storage: As a result, when it comes to preventing your wine from becoming “cooked,” maintaining the correct wine storage temperature is crucial. Take note that the temperature of wine storage differs from the temperature of wine serving. You must thus regulate the temperature of your wine once it has been removed from storage to allow it to reach the proper serving temperature before serving. Check out this article: Does Wine Freeze? Everything You Need to Know

What’s the Best Temperature to Store my Wines?

  • The ideal temperature for storing my wines is what I’d want to know in my journal.

Keeping a journal; What is the ideal temperature to keep my wines at; and other questions.

  • Light, dry white wines and sparkling wines are best served at 40-50 degrees. 60 degrees: full-bodied white wines and light fruity red wines
  • 50 degrees: rosé wine. Temperatures between 60 and 65 degrees Fahrenheit: full-bodied red wines and port wine

The best practice, on the other hand, is to maintain proper wine cellar climate control, as this will best preserve the wine until it reaches the optimal age for consumption at the time of purchase. Continue reading for a comprehensive list of recommended serving temperatures for specific wine varieties. 06/12/2020

Red wine temperature storage.

The temperature of red wine is affected by a variety of factors, including the amount of fruit, alcohol, and tannin in the wine. According to the Wine Guardian website:

  • The following temperatures are appropriate: sweet sparkling wine (39-43°F)
  • Eiswein (42-44°F)
  • Crémant (non-vintage Classic Rosé) – 42-45°F
  • Muscat New World – 43-46°F
  • Beaujolais (48-52°F)
  • Tawny Port (chilled) – 50-54°F
  • Côtes du Rhône (chilled) – 53-56°F
  • Chianti, Sangio The following wines are best served at 56-58°F: Young Bordeaux, Young Cab – 58-61°F
  • Merlot, Light Zinfandel – 58-62°F
  • Tawny Port – 59-62°F
  • Red Burgundy Pinot Noir Chianti Riserva Barolo – 56-58°F Bordeaux, California Cab, Rhone, Zinfandel, and Vintage Port are all best served at 61-63°F
  • Grand Cru Bordeaux, Mature California Cab, Rhone, Zinfandel, and Vintage Port are best served at 61-64°F.

White wine temperature storage.

Although white wine should generally be served at a colder temperature than red wine, it does not need to be stored at a cooler temperature because it will impact the fragrances. According to the Wine Guardian website:

  • Temps for Sweet Sparkling Wine: 39-43°F
  • Eiswein and Sweet Vouvray: 42-44°F
  • Crémant, non-vintage Classic Rosé: 42-45°F
  • Vintage Sparkling Wine: 43-46°F
  • Nouveau French Chablis, Chardonnay, White Burgundy, Viognier, Condrieu: 48-52°F
  • Côtes du Rhône: 53-60°F
  • Temps for Full-Bodie

Temperature consistency.

When it comes to wine preservation, maintain consistency. Temperature fluctuations in wine cellars can have a significant influence on the quality of the wine. Any temperature above 70 degrees Fahrenheit will cause the wine to mature more quickly, which might have a detrimental impact on the flavor of the wine. Any temperature that is too cold might potentially cause the cork to dry out. Consistency is considered to be one of the seven fundamental characteristics of wine storage by wine professionals such as Wine Spectator.

Temperature subjectivity.

In the same way that science and chemistry are important in wine, personal choice is important as well. Thus, if you question a group of wine enthusiasts about the temperatures at which they keep their wine, the replies will likely range. Individual taste can be quite subjective, for example, some people like wine that has been matured to allow them to appreciate secondary tastes, while others prefer a fresher, cleaner wine. The difference between storage temperature and drinking temperature has already been explained, so make sure you conduct your own study on your own wines first.

What would you like to create?

Let’s chat about your vision for the future. Together, we will design a bespoke wine cellar that represents your own style and heritage, whether it is a cellar, a room, or a whole wall.

How to store wine

Once the wine has been properly sealed in a bottle, it should be safeguarded from its most dangerous adversary, oxygen in the air. If, on the other hand, the cork begins to dry out and finally shrinks to the point that it no longer functions as an airtight barrier, it may begin to allow oxygen into the wine, causing it to deteriorate. As a result, wine bottles have typically been stored on their sides, allowing the wine to keep the cork thoroughly moist and bloated, allowing the wine to fill the bottleneck completely.

Although there is a new school of thinking that claims it may be preferable for wine to be stored at an angle, this does not guarantee that both the wine and the air bubble are in touch with the cork, as it does with other beverages.

When bottles are kept horizontally, the distance between the air bubble and the cork means that when rising temperatures cause the bubble to expand, wine may be driven out between the cork and the bottle-neck, resulting in a loss of cork integrity (the sugary deposits round the neck of many sweet wines are cited as evidence for this).

  • If temperatures change rapidly, the amount of oxygen in the air may reach dangerous levels.
  • For the reasons previously stated, temperature fluctuation is the most significant threat to wine storage, however the cooler the environment in which the wine is stored, the slower, and very potentially more fascinating, the wine’s development will be.
  • Aspects like as storage temperature are also significant, as wine’s evolution is expedited when held at higher temperatures.
  • On the other hand, there is a temperature, around 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), over which a wine’s more volatile chemicals may be boiled off forever, resulting in a reduction in color and clarity.
  • The use of maximum and lowest thermometers may be quite beneficial for assessing possible wine storage locations.
  • Strong light may have a negative impact on the flavor of wine, particularly sparkling wine, and this is especially true if the bottles are made of transparent or pale glass, as is the case here.

(This is why wine is increasingly being offered in practically black bottles, and why champagne is typically covered in tissue paper or a special light-proof cellophane.) If wine is stored in an excessively dry environment for an extended period of time, the corks might dry up and cease to function as an effective seal.

The absence of vibration is beneficial for wines that include sediment, albeit this widely held view is based more on intuition than on scientific proof, and the absence of strong odours is very essential (no old cans of paint or garden chemicals).

In actuality, the necessity of security must be evaluated against the simplicity with which it may be retrieved, with the relative value of these two variables depending on factors such as your income and willpower.

The ideal cellar

As a result of all of the foregoing, a great, dark, spacious, slightly dank cellar with a single inconspicuous entrance to which only you have the key is the best location for wine storage. A small tasting area and a huge desk are provided for keeping cellar records up to date. Although it is surrounded with wine racks, there is plenty of space to roam about and stack wine in its original cases. Unfortunately, for the majority of us, this cellar is confined to the realm of fiction. Most modern homes are severely lacking in storage space of any type, let alone a place that is cold, dark, quiet, slightly damp, and large enough to accommodate a collection of wine bottles.

  1. This is due to the possibility of temperatures dipping below -4 °C (25 °F).
  2. Central heating boilers are often installed wherever there is available storage space, which eliminates the possibility of keeping wine in the boiler unless the boiler can be insulated.
  3. Many people, however, may be hesitant to make such a significant investment and will instead be seeking for a place to store a dozen or two bottles of wine.
  4. If it is feasible, it is beneficial to put a basin of water on the ground near the wine to maintain a high degree of humidity.
  5. A quality wine rack will survive for a longer period of time and may be customized to whatever shape you like.
  6. The worst spot to keep wine (a fact that many kitchen designers are completely unaware of) is beside a stove or on top of a refrigerator, where hot air is constantly being blown at you.
  7. Eurocave is the most important supplier in the United Kingdom.

Enter the term “spiral cellar” into the general search box to get considerable coverage of these facilities, of which I, for one, am the proud possessor.

Using professional storage

In some respects, having your wine kept by experts, whether under the auspices of the merchant(s) from whom you purchased it or directly with one of the wine storage specialists, is the most straightforward alternative, particularly if you have a considerable quantity of young wine. As a result, while it may be more expensive per ‘case’ (the normal box holding dozen bottles) every year, it should ensure that the wine is preserved in optimal conditions. However, it eliminates the possibility of selecting bottles at random from your wine collection.

Please read Where to store for further information on storage services.

Getting serious about collecting wine

Wine has a strange effect on ordinarily rational individuals. Throughout their lives, they have been captivated by the urge to swap significant quantities of money for an extensive collection of bottles that would age over time. They race for good or uncommon wines that are being sold en primeur, or as futures, and they pay for them (from a reputable merchant, preferably) long before the wine is delivered to them. Alternatively, they may choose to fill gaps in their collections by purchasing older wines at auction, such as those offered by Christie’s or Sotheby’s.

In any case, wine costs are fluctuating both up and down.

To guarantee that wines don’t go bad before they’re meant to be used, reasonable record-keeping, such as that provided by online cellar management systems, is required.

Wine Storage Temperature Guide – Wineware.co.uk

Return to the Wine Refrigeration page.

  • Red wine should be stored at 12 degrees Celsius, white wine at 8 degrees Celsius, and champagne at 5 degrees Celsius. Wine cellars and wine freezers designed specifically for the purpose of storing wine give the greatest conditions for storing wine. Wine should be kept in a dark, vibration-free environment with a relative humidity of less than 70%.

It is important to keep wine at the proper temperature in order to maintain the flavor and balance of the wine. If you don’t want a wine to age prematurely or be destroyed by its storage circumstances, it’s critical to understand the best wine storage temperatures and conditions for your bottles of wine before you buy them. Extreme temperature variations are the most common cause of wine deterioration. You may avoid this by using Wineware’s ‘Wine Storage Temperature Guide,’ which gives useful advice on how to keep your bottles of wine at the optimal storage temperature.

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Our helpful wine storage tips might be of assistance!

Wine storage options

When it comes to storing your bottles of wine safely and securely, there are three primary options:

  1. Wine cellars are the best method to keep your wine bottles since they are temperature and humidity managed to perfection. Wine cellars are a cost-effective alternative for keeping wine, and they may be customized to suit the needs of each individual homeowner. It is possible to organize your wine bottles in a variety of ways, such as by wine area, such as France with Bordeaux, Bourgogne, Alsace, Loire, Rhone, and other French regions, or by grape variety. Another method of arranging wine is by vintage
  2. If you have a collection of a certain wine, arrange them in numerical order in your cellar (vertical collection). Wine bottle neck tags come in helpful for noting down the most important information about your bottle of wine, including the name and date on the front (with additional information written on the reverse). A makeshift closet wine cellar is an excellent option for wine connoisseurs and collectors. It is a simple and basic method of storing your wine bottles in any size area (small or large) in your home or apartment. You may find step-by-step instructions and videos on how to build your own improvised closet wine cellar on the internet. Your walk-in wardrobe, cupboard, or room can be transformed into a one-of-a-kind wine cellar by following these simple steps! This alternative, on the other hand, does not include a temperature control. The convenience of a makeshift closet wine cellar is ideal for the occasional drinker, but it is not as effective as long-term storage. A wine cabinet or refrigerator is a dependable way to keep your wine bottles at the proper temperature, and they are a good investment for wine specialists and wine retailers. Wine cabinets and refrigerators are available in a range of sizes to accommodate collections of various sizes.

Ideal wine storage conditions

  • Store wine away from anything that has a strong, pungent fragrance since this might cause the wine and cork to get contaminated. It is desirable to have good ventilation in your wine storage facility since this prevents musty odors from entering the wine
  • Wine is best stored in a dark and vibration-free environment. It is recommended that you should not stir bottles of wine too much or aggressively since this might cause the wine to get spoiled. Direct sunlight or a fluorescent light bulb should be avoided while storing wine since they can affect the flavor of the wine. Because of this, it is recommended that you thoroughly cover and wrap any bottles that cannot be kept shielded from light. This will provide better protection. Alternative storage methods include placing the wine bottle inside a cardboard box
  • Humidity is critical to the preservation of the wine. If the relative humidity is too high, mould can flourish and the wine bottle labels will become loose and disintegrate, creating the ideal environment for mould to thrive. As a result, it is recommended that the relative humidity does not exceed 70%. A thermohygrometer may be used to monitor humidity levels, which can be used to evaluate whether or not it is necessary to humidify or dehumidify the air. Installing a dehumidifier in the area will allow you to manage the moisture levels in the space.

Optimal wine storing temperatures

Wineware has offered this information as a general reference to assist you in storing your wine; however, please keep in mind that this is not the case for all wines and should only be used as a rough guide in general. The ideal temperature for a wine is determined by a variety of elements, including the amount of fruit, alcohol, and tannin in the wine. According to conventional guidelines, wine should be kept at a temperature of 11-14 degrees Celsius (52-57 degrees Fahrenheit). Wine storage temperatures should never be higher than 24 degrees Celsius since doing so causes the wine to oxidize, which has a detrimental effect on the wine.

For a bottle of wine to age properly, it must be kept at a consistent temperature throughout the year. Wineware has given the tables below to assist you in determining the optimal storage temperature for your wine. Wineware (click hereto download PDF).

Ideal storage temperature for wine

Wine Temperature (˚F) Temperature (˚C)
Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Burgundy, Barbaresco, Barbera, Barolo, Brunello, Recioto, Malbec 63˚F 17˚C
Shiraz, Zinfandel, Grand Cru Bordeaux, Ribera del Duero, Carmenere 64˚F 18˚C
Vintage Port, Banyuls, Madeira 66˚F 19˚C

Light-to-medium-bodied reds

Wine Temperature (˚F) Temperature (˚C)
Beaujolais 54˚F 12˚C
Young Spanish and Portuguese Wines 55˚F 13˚C
Chinon, Sherry, Tawny Port 57˚F 14˚C
Light Zinfandels, Chianti 59˚F 15˚C
Pinot Noir, Merlot, Rioja, Bordeaux (Young) 61˚F 16˚C

Dry whites

Wine Temperature (˚F) Temperature (˚C)
Alsace Riesling, Italian Whites, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Pouilly Fume, Pouilly Fuissé, Gruner Veltliner 46˚F 8˚C
Chenin Blanc, Bordeaux Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc 48˚F 9˚C
Chardonnay 50˚F 10˚C
Condrieu, White Burgundy 52˚F 11˚C
Full-bodied Chardonnay and Graves 54˚F 12˚C

Sparkling wines and sweet wines

Wine Temperature (˚F) Temperature (˚C)
Asti spumante, Cava 41˚F 5˚C
Non-vintage Champagne and Sparkling Wine 43˚F 6˚C
Sweet Vouvray, Tavel, White Zinfandel, Barsac, Icewine, Tokaji, Sauternes, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese, Sake 45˚F 7˚C
Vintage Champagne, Muscats, Riesling (New World) and Sparkling Wine 46˚F 8˚C

How long can wine be stored?

The importance of storing wine for the right period of time should not be underestimated. “All wines become better with age.” Not all wines improve with age, and in general, cheap wines do not improve with age. Red wines may be kept for between 2 and 10 years on average, depending on the amount of sugar, acid, and tannin in the wine. Many superb red wines may be matured for up to 100 years under the right conditions. White wines, on the other hand, are often only kept for two to three years at a time.

Useful wine storing tips/advice

  • It is best to store your wine horizontally in order to maintain the cork moist and reduce the likelihood of the cork drying and shrinking, enabling air to enter your bottle of wine. Plastic guards and cellar sleeves can be used to protect the labels on wine bottle corks. These are particularly beneficial in damp or moist storage environments. Check to see that when you serve your wine, you alter the temperature to enable the wine to rise or fall to the proper serving temperature. If you want further information on the optimal serving temperature for wine, please see Wineware’s ‘Perfect Drinking Temperature for Wine Guide’. You should never put wine in the freezer since it will harm the wine and might also cause damage if the wine freezes and expands, perhaps shattering the bottle. Most essential, start collecting and storing bottles of wine that you enjoy drinking! Bottle collecting may be a fun pastime, and with the right storage solution, you can get the most out of your wine bottle collection.

In the event that you require any more information or advice on storing your wine bottles (or other size bottles), please do not hesitate to contact us or refer to our helpful wine storage recommendations. Wineware also includes a ‘Perfect Drinking Temperature for Wine Guide’ to assist you in getting the most out of your wine by serving it at the optimal temperature for consumption.

The Four Wine Commandments: How to Store Wine

The “golden temperature” for wine preservation has been debated for decades, but experts generally agree that the most essential component is keeping temperature fluctuations to a minimum, ideally less than a five-degree change over the course of a 24-hour period. Temperatures ranging from 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit Temperature fluctuation: 5 degrees each day Wine may be securely stored at temperatures ranging from 40 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, although the “ideal” temperature depends on how long you intend to keep the wine.

Colder storage temperatures cause this chemical reaction to be delayed, resulting in a slower aging of the wine.

Temperature at which food is served: In general, the ideal serving temperature for wine varies greatly depending on the varietal, ranging from rich and bold reds that are generally served in the upper 50s to the mid-60s, to whites that taste best served in the upper-40s to low 50s, all the way down to down champagne and sparkling wines that taste best served in the low to mid-40s.

  1. Perhaps the bottle was being blown on by the exhaust fan from the cash register at the bar.
  2. The following is how a buddy of mine conveyed to me the importance of wine serving temperature, and it’s something I’ll never forget.
  3. Would you say something if your beloved sushi roll arrived hot?
  4. When you’re putting the wine back into your car, be cautious.
  5. Wine exposed to temperatures in excess of 80 degrees for even a short period of time can begin to cook, resulting in a permanent reduction in the quality of the wine.
  6. Many casual wine collectors may keep their surplus wine in closets and garages, which are frequently not climate-controlled environments.
  7. At the risk of sounding nitpicky, I wanted to provide one additional warning about wine storage in urban environments.
  8. This allows you to keep the wine in the kitchen while without taking up important counter or floor space in your kitchen.
  9. Wrong.
  10. That heat rises up the back of the fridge, especially if the fridge is nestled into a nook of cupboards, placing your wine squarely in the line of hot air circulation, which can damage your wine.

You are effectively slow cooking your wine, which is not the best option if you are concerned about how the wine will turn out after it’s finished.

Wine Storage Humidity

The proportion of water vapor present in the air is referred to as humidity. When it comes to wine storage humidity levels, the most important thing to remember is to avoid having the cork shrink or dry out, which may happen if the humidity levels remain too low for an extended length of time. When the cork shrinks or dries out, more air is allowed into the bottle than what is intended by the bottle manufacturer. This can oxidize the wine and lead it to age considerably more quickly, turning it more vinegar-like or causing it to become “corked.” Screw-capped wine bottles are impervious to this phenomenon.

Another worry with regard to humidity is the degradation of wine labels (which are treasured by certain collectors) and the growth of mold, both of which can occur if humidity levels remain very high for an extended period of time.

Many casual wine collectors may keep their surplus wine in their closets or garages until they need it.

Wine Storage Light Considerations

Over time, sunlight and incandescent light can both degrade the quality of wine. It is critical to store wine in a location where it will not be exposed to direct sources of ultraviolet light or other similar light. A perfect barrier to light is created by the cardboard or wooden box in which wine is purchased. This box blocks 100 percent of light. Glass used to construct wine bottles can provide some protection from the sun’s rays; both color and thickness play a role in this protection to varied degrees.

Darker glass (dark green and brown) and thicker wine bottles, on the other hand, provide far stronger UV protection, allowing those precious drops of juice to withstand the rigors of age.

Wine Storage and Vibration

In addition to increasing in sentimental value with time, maturing wine boils down to setting the perfect circumstances for a chemical process to take place in the bottle. Vinegar is agitated by vibration, which speeds up the chemical process of aging it. As a result, it is recommended that wine be stored in a location where extended exposure to vibration is reduced. Others employ wood racking, which has a natural damping effect, to store their goods.

Other Wine Storage Considerations

In addition to air, cork is a porous substance that may allow scents to enter the bottle as well as allow air to enter the bottle. Reminder to self: don’t keep your beloved bottle of sauvignon next to a bundle of garlic cloves or in the same cupboards as your bleach or other cleaning products.

Years down the line, when you finally sit down to a fantastic meal with friends, you’ll be fairly disappointed if you open your prized bottle of cab and discover mild onion overtones with a tinge of Windex in the aroma.

Shameless Plug

If you’re looking for wine storage in San Luis Obispo County, Meathead Wine Storage offers what you’re looking for. It features a backup power plan, as well as redundant and monitored temperature and humidification systems. The facility also has a 24-hour video security system with LED motion detection lights and a backup power plan. These state-of-the-art personal wine lockers are designed to provide clients peace of mind as they store their valuables. In addition to the numerous benefits that come with leasing a locker from Meathead Wine Storage, clients also have the convenience of having wine shipments and/or wine club deliveries handled directly to the facility.

Some of our clients live in states where California wineries are unable to ship to them, and as a result, they plan their vacations around the release of the next wine.

Today is the day to book your wine storage locker by clicking here.

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