What Is Chinese Cooking Wine? (Correct answer)

What Is Chinese Cooking Wine? Chinese wines are made by fermenting grain (typically rice or sticky rice mixed with millet, barley, or wheat) with a starter of molds and yeasts. There is a huge range of styles, from light, clear mijiu (similar to Japanese sake) to dark, sweet xiang xue jiu (“fragrant snow wine”).

What is a good substitute for Chinese cooking wine?

  • If you mean the darker Chinese cooking wine – Shao hsing – then dry sherry is a very good sub; for white Chinese cooking wine – a dry white (French, Italian, California, whatever.) Mirin cab be okay too, but it’s much sweeter than white Chinese wine, so adjust accordingly.

Contents

What can I use instead of Chinese cooking wine?

The best substitutes for Shaoxing Wine / Chinese Cooking Wine are as follows: Dry sherry – that’s right, just every day cheap and cheerful dry sherry; Mirin – a Japanese sweet cooking wine. If you use this, omit or reduce sugar called for in the recipe because Mirin is much sweeter than Chinese Cooking Wine.

Is Chinese cooking wine the same as rice wine vinegar?

Cooking wines, sold in local supermarkets, are overly salted and have a different flavor than a Chinese rice wine. And don’t confuse Chinese rice-wine vinegar with Chinese rice wine—it is a vinegar, not a wine, and will add an acidic flavor.

What is the difference between Chinese cooking wine and regular wine?

This amber-colored rice wine differs from clear rice cooking wine, or mǐjiǔ (米酒), in that it has a more complex and deeper taste. Comparing the lighter flavor of rice wine vs. Shaoxing wine is like the difference between using salt or light soy sauce. One is more purely salty, while the other adds a richer flavor.

Can I use rice vinegar instead of Chinese cooking wine?

While Sake is a Japanese rice wine, Huangjiu and Choujiu are produced in China. Rice wine is very widely used in Southeast Asian cuisines. Apple juice or grape juice mixed with a small amount of rice vinegar may work as a substitute, especially in stir-fry marinades.

Does Walmart sell Shaoxing wine?

ShaoXing (Shao Hsing) Rice Cooking Wine 25.3 FL Oz (750 mL) – Walmart.com.

Where do you find cooking wine in the grocery store?

Your first tipoff that bottles labeled “cooking wine” aren’t fit to drink is that they’re usually shelved near the vinegars and salad dressings in your local grocery store. Your best bet is to select a bottle from the wine section of your grocery store, or better yet, your local wine shop.

Can I use white vinegar instead of rice wine?

If your recipe only calls for a bit of rice wine vinegar (like a stir-fry that features lots of other flavors), you can substitute in any other kind of light-colored vinegar, he explains. White vinegar, for example, isn’t nearly as sweet as rice vinegar, but works pretty well in these cases.

Are mirin and rice wine the same?

Although it sometimes gets confused with rice wine vinegar, mirin actually is a sweet rice wine used in Japanese cooking. It doesn’t just flavor food. The sweetness also gives luster to sauces and glazes and can help them cling to food. You can just use dry sherry or sweet marsala, for instance.

Can I use soju instead of rice wine?

Substitutions: You can try Japanese cold sake or regular white wine. Soju can work although it doesn’t have the hint of sweetness. Dry sherry is preferable to sake (the Japanese rice wine) which has a sweeter flavor than Korean rice wines.

Can I substitute cooking wine for white wine?

Yes! If you’re on the fence about cooking with wine, we highly encourage you to try it. It adds a flavor unlike anything else. One note: do not use cooking wine!

Is Chardonnay a cooking wine?

Chardonnay A splash of Chardonnay should be used in heavy creamy dishes such as gravy or a cream sauce for pasta. This white wine is good for cooking as it balances the acidity of these delectable dishes while also bringing out the rich flavors.

Can you get drunk off cooking wine?

Drinking cooking wine can get you drunk, but cooking with it will not. As noted above, cooking wine has a high ABV. Regardless of any other content, high levels of alcohol are entirely capable of getting someone drunk. Drinking cooking wine would be equivalent to drinking a heavier red wine.

Can I use apple cider vinegar instead of Shaoxing wine?

The bottom line: If you love Asian cuisine, it’s worth keeping rice wine vinegar in your pantry. In a pinch, though, you can totally substitute in another light, mild vinegar, like apple cider vinegar or champagne vinegar.

What can I use if I don’t have mirin?

You can always buy mirin online, but if you’re really in a crunch, you can sub in a dry sherry or a sweet marsala wine. Dry white wine or rice vinegar will also do, though you’ll need to counteract the sourness with about a 1/2 teaspoon of sugar for every tablespoon you use.

What does Chinese cooking wine taste like?

The most obvious answer is that it tastes delicious. Take a little sip of your Chinese cooking wine (even if it’s salted) and swirl it around your tongue. You should find sweet, sour, astringent, and umami notes, along with a rich, complex aroma.

Shaoxing Wine: Chinese Ingredients

Shaoxing wine is one of the most popular ingredients on The Woks of Life that you’ve never heard of before. It’s also one of the most expensive. If you’ve ever wondered why your homemade Chinese food doesn’t taste quite like the stuff you’d receive at a restaurant, it’s possible that Shaoxing wine is the missing piece of the puzzle. Shaoxing wine is used in a variety of cuisines, from stir-fries to dumplings and wontons, and it is another essential Chinese pantry component that can be found on our list of 10 Essential Chinese Pantry Ingredients.

What stores sell it and how much does it cost?

In this short post, we’ll go over all of that and more.

What Is Shaoxing Wine?

Shaoxing wine, also known as shàoxing ji(), is a sort of Chinese rice wine that is named after Shaoxing, a city in China’s Zhejiang Province that is well-known for its rice wine manufacturing. A essential element in many recipes, it will give your meal that true restaurant flavor that may have previously been impossible to recreate at home, but is now simple to do so. Shaoxing Wine is one of the oldest varieties of rice wine in China, with early documents describing it more than 2000 years ago.

  • Fermenting rice, water, and a little quantity of wheat are used in the production process (notice that it does include wheat, therefore it is not gluten-free).
  • It’s clear rather than clouded, has a dark amber hue, and has a somewhat sweet, aromatic perfume that’s not overwhelming.
  • For cooking, however, we use a lower-quality Shaoxing wine with salt added to it in order to 1) avoid paying an alcohol tax and 2) allow it to be sold in ordinary supermarkets.
  • In terms of flavor, comparing the lighter flavor of rice wine to that of Shaoxing wine is similar to comparing the difference between using salt and light soy sauce.
  • We’ve really traveled to the Chinese city of Shaoxing to discover more about the history of wine making there!

Alternate NamesSpellings

A sort of Chinese rice wine known as shaoxing wine, orshàoxng ji(), is named after Shaoxing, a city in China’s Zhejiang Province that is well-known for its rice wine manufacturing. In many meals, it’s an essential component, and it’ll help you get the true restaurant flavor that you’ve been trying to recreate at home. Shaoxing Wine is one of the earliest varieties of rice wine in China, with early documents describing it more than 2000 years ago. Fermenting rice, water, and a little quantity of wheat are used in the production process (please note that it does include wheat, and so is not gluten-free).

  1. With a dark amber hue rather than being clouded, it has a somewhat sweet and aromatic perfume that is pleasant rather than overpowering.
  2. For cooking, however, we use a lower-quality Shaoxing wine with salt added to it in order to 1) avoid paying an alcohol tax and 2) allow it to be sold at normal grocery shops.
  3. It’s similar to the difference between using salt or light soy sauce when comparing the lighter flavor of rice wine vs.
  4. Both are salty, but one is more intensely so, while the other is more complex in flavor.

Indeed, we’ve been to the Chinese city of Shaoxing in order to learn more about the old art of winemaking there! The style of the clay jars that were used to keep wine may be seen in a couple of the photographs below.

How Is It Used?

Shaoxing wine, like wine used in Western recipes, provides depth and richness to the flavors of the meal. We use it in marinades for meats, as a flavoring agent in wonton or dumpling fillings, to deglaze our wok and enhance the taste of stir-fries, and to flavor sauces and braises, among other applications. Indeed, we’d go so far as to claim that Shaoxing wine is present in the great majority of our savory dishes. Hong Shao Yu (Chinese Braised Fish) and Shanghai Style Braised Pork Belly (Shanghai Style Braised Pork Belly) are two meals that require the use of Shaoxing Wine to be successful (Hong Shao Rou).

A classic cold snack fittingly dubbed “Drunken Chicken,” in which the bird is fried and then steeped in a brine of Shaoxing wine and herbs, is also made using the chicken.

Again, there are varieties of high-quality Shaoxing wine that are intended for consumption (and are typically served warm), but in the United States, salt is added to the wine in order to evade alcohol taxes and to allow it to be sold in locations where ordinary wine and liquor cannot be sold.

BuyingStoring

Shaoxing wine is readily available at any Chinese grocery shop, and there are a variety of brands to choose from. The majority of them are packaged in a red bottle (one brand seems to have created the design and others followed suit). The bottom line is to buy, test, and swap if you aren’t satisfied with your purchase. We frequently purchase a regular-sized bottle as well as gallon jugs from our local store in order to replenish the smaller bottle because we use it so frequently. It’s inexpensive and will keep for a long time in the pantry.

  • According to our experience, it may be stored in the pantry for up to 6 months.
  • When it comes to wine quality and price, the usual rule is that the more costly the wine, the greater the quality of the wine it represents (less briny, more flavor).
  • It is visible that the bottle of Shaoxing wine in the photograph below costs around $5.
  • For as little as $2, you can obtain a bottle of Shaoxing wine suitable for everyday cooking.
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Substitutions for Shaoxing Wine

It is one of the most often asked questions we receive on the site, “Is there an alternative for the Shaoxing wine?” If you plan to cook Chinese dishes at home on a regular basis, we recommend that you visit your local Chinese market and purchase a bottle (it can also be purchased online, though at a price that is double or triple that of buying it in a store). You’ll use it in the vast majority of the dishes you prepare, and the flavor makes all the difference. The most popular alternative we offer is dry cooking sherry, which is readily accessible in any supermarket if you are unable to locate it or need a quick substitution for a one-time cooking experiment.

You can also use Japanese or Korean wines, such as soju or sake, as a replacement in modest quantities.

Keep in mind, however, that it is unlikely that the meal would taste truly Chinese, and you should exclude any sugar included in the recipe because mirin is far sweeter than Shaoxing wine.

Non-Alcoholic Substitute for Shaoxing Wine

The majority of the alcohol in the wine is cooked off during the high heat cooking phase (as in the case of stir-fries) or the protracted cooking period (as in the case of stews) (in the case of braises). The most frequent non-alcoholic alternative we offer for stir-fries and sauces (in amounts equal to or less than 2 tablespoons) is chicken, mushroom, or vegetable stock, which may be used in place of the alcohol if you are unable to consume alcohol due to health, religious, or personal reasons.

Shaoxing wine is optional in recipes where it is used in small amounts (less than 1 tablespoon), so you may feel free to leave it out.

Our Favorite Dishes That Use This Ingredient:

  • Among the dishes on the menu are Drunken Chicken, Chinese Braised Fish, Shanghai Style Braised Pig Belly (Red Cooked Pork Belly), Three Cup Chicken, and Instant Pot Pork Belly. Dumplings made with this recipe are the only dumplings you’ll ever need. Stew of Pork Ribs

If you have any further questions concerning Shaoxing wine, please post them in the comments below; we will do our best to answer each and every one.

Shaoxing wine substitutes:

  • Any Chinese rice wine (such as clear rice wine ormi chiu/mijiu)
  • Any Chinese rice wine (such as steamed rice wine)
  • Korean rice wine (cooking wine) is a dry cooking sherry that is made from rice. Mirin (if using mirin, decrease the amount of sugar in the recipe because mirin is fairly sweet)
  • Sake (Japanese rice wine, commonly used as an alcoholic beverage)
  • South Korea’s national drink, soju (a distilled beverage manufactured mostly from rice, wheat, or barley)
  • Anything made from rice, including Chinese rice wine (such as clear rice wine ormi chiu/mijiu)
  • Any type of Chinese rice wine
  • Korean rice wine (cooking wine) is a dry cooking sherry. As a result of the sweetness of mirin, it is recommended that you reduce the amount of sugar in the recipe if you use it. Japan’s rice wine, known as Sake, is typically consumed for its refreshing taste. South Korea’s national drink, soju (a distilled beverage made primarily of rice, wheat, or barley)
nutritional info disclaimer

TheWoksofLife.com is written and created only for the purpose of providing information. While we make every effort to give nutritional information to our readers as a general guideline, we are not professional nutritionists, and the figures supplied should be regarded as educated guesses. The nutritional information in any dish will vary depending on a variety of factors such as the brand of food purchased, natural variances in fresh ingredients, and so on. In addition, different online calculators produce varying answers based on their data sources.

Chinese Cooking Wine Brings Tangy Depth to, Well.Everything

Websites such as TheWoksofLife.com are authored and published only for the purpose of providing information to visitors. While we make every effort to give nutritional information to our readers as a general guideline, we are not professional nutritionists, and the figures supplied should be regarded as educated guesses only. The nutritional information in any dish will vary depending on a variety of factors such as the brand of food purchased, natural variances in fresh ingredients, and so on.

For correct nutritional information for a dish, use your favourite nutrition calculator to estimate nutritional information based on the exact ingredients and quantities used in the recipe.

Amazon.com : Soeos Shaoxing Cooking Wine 21.64 fl oz (640ml), Regular, 1 Pack, Shaoxing Rice Wine, Chinese Cooking Wine, Rice Cooking Wine, Shaoxing Wine Chinese Cooking Wine, Shaohsing Wine, Shao Hsing Rice Wine. : Grocery & Gourmet Food

The document will be reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2020. Regular FlavorSize: 21.64 Fl Oz Flavor Name: Regular (Pack of 1) Purchase that has been verified Since the outbreak began, I have prepared more than 100 dinners that have included some sort of cooking wine, most often shaoxing wine. This is my favorite of the four kinds that I have tested, and the reasons for this are as follows: In comparison to a couple others I tested, this one has a better balance of caramel aromas, “sweetness,” and acidity that is absent from other cooking wines.

  1. This has proven to be really handy for roasting meats and even when cooking noodles.
  2. Name of Flavor: RegularSize: 21.64 Fl Oz (Pack of 1)Purchased with a verified purchase The base of the sauce is just soy sauce with alcohol added to it.
  3. It’s preferable to use a dry sherry or a Japanese sake instead.
  4. When it comes to legitimate items, they have practically no quality control whatsoever.
  5. The product was reviewed in the United States on December 27, 2020.
  6. I came to the realization that I couldn’t make authentic Asian cuisine without authentic Asian components such as spices, veggies, and this wine.
  7. I made a promise to myself that I would do better.

It adds a pinch of salt as well as that little something more to make tastes pop.

When using this, reduce the amount of salt you use or leave it out entirely.

Although I attempted to cook burgers with a variety of wines without success, when I tried this, I got a “A-HA” moment.

On February 12, 2018, a review was conducted in the United States.

It is a sort of fermented rice wine that is similar to shiraz.

In comparison to mijiu rice wine, which is an unflavored rice cooking wine, this shaohsing rice cooking wine is more flavorful, and it thus enhances the flavor of the other components.

Alternatively, a small amount of this can be used in regular cooking.

The document will be reviewed in the United States on April 11, 2020.

I opened the package to find it ruined, with liquid dripping all over my hands.

When I reported the item as damaged and sought a refund/return, I was advised that this item was not eligible for a refund/return.

On April 3, 2021, a review will be conducted in the United States.

16.2 fl oz.

My cooking becomes more real when I use this Shaoxing organic cooking rice wine, which has a distinct flavor from other cooking rice wines.

I’m quite pleased with this product and will continue to purchase it as well as maintain a supply on hand at all times.

Regular FlavorSize: 21.64 Fl Oz Flavor Name: Regular (Pack of 1) Purchase that has been verified Following a failed attempt to get rice wine at my local Asian grocery, I decided to make do with rice wine instead.

I made the decision to purchase online and am quite pleased with my decision.

It’s exactly like ordering Chinese takeout!

On September 26, 2020, Yolanda posted Following a failed attempt to get rice wine at my local Asian grocery, I decided to make do with rice wine instead.

I made the decision to purchase online and am quite pleased with my decision.

It’s exactly like ordering Chinese takeout! The photographs in this review On May 4, 2019, a review was conducted in the United States. Regular FlavorSize: 21.64 Fl Oz Flavor Name: Regular (Pack of 1) Purchase that has been verified Excellent rice wine. It’s a good match for my WOK.

Shaoxing wine – Wikipedia

Shaoxing wine
A smaller scaled version of the classic Shaoxing wine container
Simplified Chinese 绍兴酒
Traditional Chinese 紹興酒
Transcriptions
Standard Mandarin
Hanyu Pinyin Shàoxīng jiǔ
Yue: Cantonese
Jyutping siu6 hing1 zau2
Southern Min
HokkienPOJ siāu-heng-chiú

Wine created from sticky rice, water, and yeast derived from wheat (also known as “yellow wine”) is a traditional Chinese beverage known as shaoxing (also spelled Shaoxing, Hsiaohsing, and Shaoshing). It must be manufactured in the eastern Chinese city of Shaoxing, in the province of Zhejiang. In Chinese cuisine, it is frequently used as a beverage as well as a cooking wine in a variety of dishes. It is well-known and recognized across mainland China, as well as in Taiwan and Southeast Asia, on a global scale.

Production

In the original process, the rice mash was physically stirred every 4 hours using a sort of wooden hoe, in order to aid the yeast in breaking down the sugars equally. It was known as askipá(), and it was a necessary ability in order to make wines that were not bitter or sour. When the winemaker is listening to the vat for bubbling, he or she may determine whether or not the fermentation is progressing properly. Shaoxing wine may also be made using sorghumor millet, which is a grain that is similar to sticky rice.

Aged wines are identified by the year in which they were brewed, in a manner comparable to the year in which grapes were harvested (chénnián).

Mislabeling wines from locations other than Shaoxing is a “common fraudulent activity,” according to the Chinese government.

Prominent producers

  • Zhejiang Gu Yue Long Shan Shaoxing Wine Co., Ltd. () of Shaoxing, Zhejiang
  • Zhejiang Gu Yue Long Shan Shaoxing Wine Co., Ltd. () of Shaoxing, Zhejiang
  • Zhejiang Gu Yue
  • In addition to Di Ju Tang, there is Kuai ji Shan (named after a nearby mountain), Tu Shao Jiu, Nü Er Hong, and others.

It is estimated that 80 rice wine producers in Shaoxing would generate income of 4.3 billion yuan ($664 million) in 2020.

History

In China, rice wine has been manufactured since approximately 770 BC to 221 BC, and it was traditionally used for ceremonial purposes. A group of educated Shaoxing councilors was responsible for spreading the popularity of wine drinking throughout China in the late Qing era. Wine was an integral feature of Chinese banquets during this period. A large quantity is produced and preserved in clay jars for an extended length of time. Interest in Nü Er Hong, a brand of shaoxing wine popular in Hong Kong during the 1980s, arose as a result of a nostalgic interest in mainland Chinese customs, as well as references to the wine in popular martial arts books of the period.

In China, its popularity has faded in favor of other forms of alcoholic beverages, and it has earned a reputation as “old fashioned,” despite the fact that it is still used in cooking.

Classification

Classification

Namein Chinese Literal translation Sugar content(g/L) Type Ethanolby vol. (%)
yuanhongjiu 元红酒 Premier red wine 5 Dry wine 14.5
jiafanjiu 加饭酒huadiaojiu花雕酒 Wine with added rice Wine in jar, engraved with flowers 5–30 Semi-dry wine 16.0
shanniangjiu善酿酒 Well-fermented wine 30–100 Sweet wine (moelleux) 15.0
xiangxuejiu香雪酒fenggangjiu封缸酒 Snow-flavored wine Jug wines 200 Sweet wine (doux) 13.0

Usage

Drinking Shaoxing wine as a beverage or in place of rice at the start of a meal are both acceptable options. In their own homes, some families choose to sip their wine from rice bowls, which is exactly the method of serving used at the Xian Heng Inn. If it is not served with a meal, Shaoxing wine might be offered as an accompaniment to peanuts or other typical snack foods. When a girl is born into a household in Shaoxing, the practice of making Nér Ji(), or “daughter’s wine,” is followed. Upon the daughter’s marriage, the family removes a jug of wine that has been hidden in the wall.

A significant component in Mao Zedong’s favorite cuisine of braised pork belly with scallion greens, which he referred to as his “brain food” since it assisted him in defeating his adversaries, is scallion greens.

The following is a list of some of the other frequent Shaoxing wine-marinated foods that are available. It includes, but is not restricted to, the following:

  • Drunken chicken()
  • Drunken shrimp()
  • Drunkengizzard()
  • Drunken fish()
  • Drunken crab()
  • Drunken liver()
  • Drunkentofu()
  • Drunkphoenix talon()
  • Drunkengizz

References

  1. The first episode of the ABCTVB program Natural Heritage aired on January 30, 2008. Only available at the Shaoxing Winery
  2. AbShen, Fei
  3. Yang, Danting
  4. Ying, Yibin
  5. Li, Bobin
  6. Yunfeng
  7. Jiang, Tao (2012-02-01). Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemometrics were used to distinguish between Shaoxing Wines and other Chinese Rice Wines, according to the authors. Food and Bioprocess Technology.5(2): 786–795.doi: 10.1007/s11947-010-0347-z.ISSN1935-5149
  8. AbcdefTao, Ni
  9. Doi: 10.1007/s11947-010-0347-z.ISSN1935-5149
  10. (2021-08-26). “Nü Er Hong: How a rice vintner built a renowned Chinese brand” is the title of the article. SupChina is a Chinese acronym that means “successful in China” (in American English). The following was retrieved on 2009-09-24: abcdTao, Ni (2021-05-13). “In Shaoxing, a group of youthful winemakers is attempting to resurrect China’s ancient soul.” SupChina is a Chinese acronym that means “successful in China” (in American English). Archived from the original on 2011-09-25
  11. Ab The tangy richness of Chinese cooking wine enhances the flavor of, well, everything. Shaoxingwine.com and Lee, Yuan-Kun (2021-05-07)
  12. Salon (2021-05-07
  13. Retrieved2021-09-25)
  14. (2006). Introduction to Microbial Biotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (2nd revised ed.). 9789812566767
  15. World Scientific.ISBN9812566767 Malcolm Moore is a British actor and director (29 January 2010). “China establishes a new standard for Chairman Mao’s preferred meal.” The Daily Telegraph is a British newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. 5 February 2012
  16. Retrieved 5 February 2012

Chinese Rice Wines Can Be Used in a Variety of Dishes

Besides being eaten as an alcoholic beverage, Shaoxingrice wine is also utilized as a component in Asian meals, particularly Chinese food prepared in the Shanghai style. A fermented and distillated rice product, where the rice starch is transformed to sugars, is used to make it. Taiwan and Southeast Asia are well-known for having it and making it readily available to their citizens. This ingredient is well worth hunting out since it may make all the difference when it comes to recreating the flavor of anything you might have eaten at a Chinese restaurant, such as drunken chicken or kung pao chicken.

Fast Facts

China is the country of origin. Drinking and cooking are the most common use. Other names for this plant include shao hsing, shao xing, and shaohsing.

What Is Shaoxing Wine?

Shaoxing rice wine (also known asshao hsing, shao xing, orshaohsingwine) is a type of Chinese wine that comes from the city of Shaoxing in the province of Zhejiang, which is famous for its rice farming. Due to the fact that it is manufactured from fermenting rice, water, and a trace quantity of wheat, it is not gluten free. This brown rice wine has a taste that is significantly stronger yet sweeter thanmijiu, another rice wine that is popular in both Chinese and Tawainese cuisines. The alcohol concentration of Shaoxing wine is between 18 and 25 percent, making it a powerful drink when compared to beer (which has an average alcohol content of 5 percent) and wine (which has an average alcohol content of 15 percent) (coming in around 12 percent).

Shaoxing wine is available in several varieties, one of which is known as nu’er hong().

This particular form of Shaoxing wine is made by every family in Shaoxing when their daughter is one month born, and then the bottle is buried in the ground until the day of their daughter’s wedding, when it is opened and drunk to commemorate the occasion.

Shaoxing Wine vs. Mirin

Some sites will tell you that mirin is an excellent alternative for Shaoxing wine, and it will work in a pinch if you reduce the amount of sugar in your recipe by half. Dry sherry is a superior and more convenient alternative (not cooking sherry). When compared to Shaoxing wine, Mirin has a deeper, more complex flavor that is slightly sweet in nature. In truth, dry sherry may occasionally be specified as an ingredient in recipes for Chinese cuisine, not because it is widely used in China, but rather because it is more recognizable to Americans than Shaoxing wine, and because it is a suitable alternative for the traditional wine.

Varieties

Shaoxing wine is classified into two categories. Aged Shaoxing wine is often offered in a ceramic jug and served warm as a beverage, but it can and should be used in the kitchen as a cooking ingredient as well. In order to be sold in grocery shops and, increasingly, online, the variety called “cooking wine” has salt added to make it more readily available.

It’s not a wine that you’d necessarily want to drink on a regular basis. Depending on your budget and personal taste preferences, you may use any of them in your cuisine.

How to Cook With Shaoxing Wine

Shaoxing wine is available in two varieties. You can and should cook with aged Shaoxing wine, which is often sold in a ceramic jug and served warm as a beverage. However, you can and should also drink it. In order to be sold in grocery shops and, increasingly, online, the sort called “cooking wine” has salt added to make it easier to sell. That being said, it’s not a wine that you’d necessarily want to drink every day. Depending on your budget and taste preferences, you may use any of them in your cuisine.

What Does It Taste Like?

It’s a clear, amber-colored beverage with a somewhat peppery and slightly sweet flavor that’s slightly sweet. Some describe the flavor as caramel-like, while others describe it as nutty, and yet others perceive hints of vinegar.

Shaoxing Wine Recipes

When it comes to Chinese cuisine, this component is utilized widely, particularly in the most popular takeaway meals, such as askung pao chicken and oyster sauce chicken. Use it in any Chinese dish that asks for rice wine; that’s often what they’re referring to when they say “rice wine.” Make these braises and stir-fries with it to see what you think.

  • Cantonese-Style Braised Pork Belly with Red Fermented Bean Curd
  • Stir-Fry Chicken in Rice Wine
  • Chinese Orange Pork Chop Stir-Fry
  • Cantonese-Style Braised Pork Belly with Red Fermented Bean Curd
  • Cantonese-Style Braised Pork Belly with

Where to Buy Shaoxing Wine

Shaoxing wine may be found at Asian grocery stores (particularly Chinese markets) and on the internet. The item may be found in the international department of several well-stocked supermarkets.

Storage

Shaoxing wine, particularly the aged kind, will keep for up to six months provided it is kept bottled and stored in a cold, dark location. If you don’t intend to use it frequently, you may keep it in the refrigerator until you need it. Shaoxing cooking wine is non-perishable and does not require refrigeration. Keep it in the pantry and only remember to check it for expiration dates.

Suggested Substitutions for Rice Wine in Asian Cooking

A must-have ingredient in Chinese cookery, rice wine (also known asmijiu) is second only to soy sauce in terms of significance, according to some sources. In contrast to the majority of wines, rice wine is prepared from fermented glutinous rice, in which the sugars in the rice are converted to alcohol by yeast. Rice wine is a transparent, somewhat sweet liquid that is used in marinades to tenderize meat and shellfish while also imparting flavor to the dish being marinated. Rice wine is also used as the base for a herbal soup that is intended to aid new mothers in their recovery after giving birth.

The unfortunate reality is that, while rice wine is commonly accessible in Chinese and Asian grocery, it is not always simple to locate at typical local supermarkets and convenience stores.

Pale Dry Sherry

Pale drysherry, which is readily available at liquor stores, is the most frequently recommended replacement for rice wine. In terms of flavor, it is most similar toShaoxingrice wine (also spelledShao-hsingorShaohsing), an amber-colored wine prepared from glutinous rice, wheat yeast, and spring water, but it is not as sweet.

Because rice wine may be difficult to come by, many recipes will simply call for dry sherry as an ingredient, with no mention of rice wine as an option.

Gin and Wine

In China, there are many different varieties of rice wines. While Shaoxing rice wine is often recommended because of its consistently good quality, there are also numerous other types of rice wines. If a recipe asks for white-rice wine, replacing gin is an excellent choice since it has a taste that is more similar to white-rice wines than dry sherry, and it is less expensive. While a dry white wine does not have the same flavor as Chinese rice wine, it may be used in marinades and is a reasonable substitute when you don’t have any Chinese rice wine on hand.

Non-Alcoholic

In the absence of alcoholic beverages, apple juice or white grape juice are acceptable substitutes for rum. Because the acid in the juice serves as a tenderizer, it may be used as a substitute for rice wine in stir-fry marinades and other dishes. Keep in mind, though, that the flavor will not be quite the same and, in fact, will be a little sweeter.

Japanese Rice Wines

In the absence of alcoholic beverages, apple juice or white grape juice are acceptable substitutes for wine. It is a suitable substitute for rice wine in stir-fry marinades since the acid in the juice serves as a tenderizer. Consider that the flavor will not be precisely the same and will actually be a little sweeter as a result of this substitution.

What to Avoid

When looking for a rice wine alternative, it’s critical to stay away from a few specific elements. In contrast to Chinese rice wine, cooking wines offered in local stores are highly salty and have a distinct flavor from one another. Not to mention that Chinese rice wine vinegar is not the same as China’s rice wine; it is more like vinegar than a wine, and it will impart an acidic flavor.

Why Use It, How to Use

Yellow wine is used to make Chinese cooking wine, which is referred to as “liaojiu” in Chinese. It is combined with a variety of spices, including Chinese cinnamon and nutmeg. It has a low alcohol concentration (less than 15 percent) and is high in amino acids. Cooking wine has the effect of removing or masking the fishy smell and greasiness that can be found in meat, fish, and seafood. Cooking wine may help enhance the savory aroma of the dish being prepared. It’s more of a seasoning than a beverage, though.

Beer, white liquor, and whiskey may all be used as cooking wines, according to certain theories.

And the dish that has been seasoned with Chinese cooking wine made from yellow wine has the greatest flavor.

Nutritive Value and Health Benefits

Chinese cooking wine is high in eight essential amino acids for the human body, including leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and threonine, to name a few examples.

Particularly effective are the amino acids lysine and tryptophan, which can stimulate the production of neurotransmitters in the brain, so improving sleep quality while also promoting the physical growth of youngsters.

Why use Chinese cooking wine in cooking?

Traditionally, the primary function of Chinese cooking wine is to remove the fishy smell and greasiness from foods such as meat and fish. The material with a fishy odor is dissolved in hot alcohol in cooking wine, and the alcohol is evaporated away, leaving the substance behind. The cooking wine also includes a range of amino acids, which impart a rich fragrant taste to the foods when cooked.

How to Use Chinese Cooking Wine

Fresh fish, seafood, and other meats can be soaked in cooking wine before cooking to aid in the dissolving of fishy-smelling compounds, and then allowed to evaporate with ethanol while the item is being prepared. This is typically used for steamed and brewed meals, among other things.

Add it during cooking

Fresh fish, seafood, and other meats can be soaked in cooking wine before cooking to aid in the breakdown of fishy-smelling compounds, and then allowed to evaporate with ethanol while the dish is being cooked to enhance the flavor. Steaming and brewing dishes are two common applications for this appliance.

What’s the difference between Chinese cooking wine and yellow wine?

1. The most significant distinction between Chinese cooking wine and yellow wine is that yellow wine is a type of beverage drink, whereas cooking wine is used as a flavoring agent in cooking. 2. 2. Yellow wine serves as the foundation for the development of cooking wine. It starts with 30 to 50% yellow wine as a base, and then adds a variety of fragrant spices such as minced pork, cinnamon, and anise to finish it off. In addition to seasoning, yellow wine may be used as a seasoning, although it will be less effective than cooking wine.

Cooking wine is exclusively intended for use in the kitchen; it cannot be consumed as a beverage.

The cost of boiling wine is significantly less expensive.

Chinese Seasonings – This page was last updated on September 02, 2019 –

Cook with Chinese Cooking Wine

Written by Karen Le Wines are used in cooking in a variety of cuisines, not simply French cuisine. Chinese cooking wine, also known as Shaoxingcooking wine, is a type of wine that is widely consumed all over the world. It is made from fermented sticky rice and has an alcohol content ranging from 14 to 20 percent. It is transparent amber in color and has a low alcohol content. The fermenting process results in a complex dry flavor that is a combination of sweet, bitter, sour, spicy, and savoury notes, among others.

It enhances the depth and richness of sauces, broths, and any other dish to which it is added.

5 Reasons to Cook With Chinese Cooking Wine

Using Chinese cooking wine, the expression “a little goes a long way” is quite accurate.

Given that it has a stronger flavor than normal wine when compared to other Asian cooking wines, most stir-fry recipes only call for 1 to 2 teaspoons when using this cooking wine. It’s also widely used in braising and marinades, among other things.

1. Remove Greasiness and Unpleasant Smells

While marinating your protein, using it to lessen the raw or fishy smell from your protein while infusing a nice flavor into the meal might be beneficial. The lipids from the meat that are responsible for the odor are dissolved in the alcohol and transported away by the evaporation of the alcohol. This also helps to limit the quantity of grease produced.

2. Enhance Aroma

Chinese cooking wine has a pleasant aroma and is mellow in flavor. It is really well-balanced with the scent of the dish. It not only enhances the flavor of the meal, but it also increases the scent of the food, resulting in dishes that are fragrant.

3. Add Flavour

Chinoiserie wine is aromatic and mellow in flavor. In terms of scent, it is quite complementary to that of food. Foods are infused with fragrance since it not only enhances flavor but also increases the aroma of the meal.

4. Tenderize Meat

Using Chinese cooking wine to tenderize meats in the same way that it may minimize the greasiness of a meal is a good idea. It accomplishes this by burrowing into the food tissue and dissolving a little quantity of organic debris, which results in the meat being more soft.

5. Keep Dishes Fresh

Chinese cooking wine’s chemical composition not only generates a delightful aromatic perfume, but it also includes salt, which is beneficial for health. The meal does not get saltier as a result of the sweetness of the flavors that counteract the salt. However, the salt from the wine helps to keep the food fresh for longer periods of time by functioning as a natural preservative.

4 Health Benefits of Drinking Chinese Cooking Wine

Warm Chinese cooking wine, in addition to being used to enhance the flavors of a food, is also popular as a beverage in China during the chilly winter months. Despite the fact that it cannot be compared to other varieties of wine, it has been shown to be healthy to the body. Its principal advantage is that it helps to warm the body, but it also has several additional health benefits. Here are four health benefits of using Chinese cooking wine in your cooking. Colds are fought off– It possesses antibacterial qualities, which aid in the fight against pathogens in the body.

  1. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese cooking wine is said to have warmyangenergy, also known asqi, which helps to warm the body.
  2. Stomach Aches Are Relieved – It contains citric and lactic acids, which can aid to reduce digestive disorders such as stomachaches and improve better digestion in general by promoting better digestion.
  3. The fact that it includes warm yang energy, as previously stated, means that it can aid to balance out the yin energy and alleviate stomach problems.
  4. The presence of alcohol in it also contributes to the enhancement of the therapeutic properties of the herbs while also speeding up the rate at which they take action.
  5. To reap the advantages of this beverage, it is advised that you drink no more than 200 mL each day.

The customary method of consuming it is to warm it up before drinking it. To do so, place a bottle of it in water and bring the water up to 35°C in order to extract the greatest scent and maximize the health benefits of the herb.

Chinese Cooking Wine Recipes

Despite the fact that Chinese cooking wine is used in a variety of recipes, there are certain that are more recognized for using the item. “Drunken” recipes are recipes that have been altered to include alcohol. This name refers to the use of Chinese cooking wine in recipes such as Drunken Chicken or Drunken Clams, which are both popular in China. Prepare and share your thoughts on the recipe provided below. If you like this dish, you might also like some of our other recipes.

Drunken Clam Recipe

4 portions (servings) Time Required for Preparation: 35 minutes Preparation time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound Manila clams
  • 1/3 cup kosher salt (iodized salt will kill the clams)
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 2 inches fresh ginger, sliced into thin match-like strips
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup kosher salt (iodized salt will kill the clams). Scallion, 2 stalks, sliced thinly
  • 1 cup Chinese cooking wine (optional). season with salt to taste a pinch of white pepper powder
  • A smidgeon of sesame oil

Instructions:

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the kosher salt, cornmeal, and a small amount of cold water one hour before cooking. Refrigerate for 1 hour to remove sand from the clams before serving. Clams should be rinsed well under cold running water after being removed from the cornmeal mixture. Remove the clams from the water and set them aside. Heat the oil in a wok over high heat until shimmering. The ginger should be sautéed until it is golden brown. Combine the clams and Chinese cooking wine in a large mixing bowl. Cover the wok and set it aside for 3 minutes to vaporize. For those who like their meal to be extra intoxicating and your clams to be really inebriated, you may use 2 cups of it instead. Toss in a dab of sesame oil, a pinch of white pepper powder, and salt to taste after removing the lid. Cover the wok once again for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until all of the clam shells have opened up completely. All clams that did not open should be thrown away. Remove the pan from the heat and place it on a platter. Garnish with onions, if desired. ready to be of service

Top 10 Chinese Cooking Wines

Chinese cooking wine is just as significant as soy sauce in Chinese cuisine. Purchasing a bottle of wine from this top ten list of Chinese cooking wines will never go wrong. For further details, please see The Ultimate Guide to Chinese Cooking Wine for more information.

Pagoda Shaoxing Huadiao Cooking Wine (No Salt)

Shaoxing cooking wine is widely regarded as the greatest cooking wine on the planet. When it comes to the delectable foods you are preparing, you never want to sacrifice quality by using a poor cooking wine selection. Huadiao cooking wines from Pagoda Shaoxing are the greatest Shaoxing cooking wines you can obtain in the United States of America. Because they do not include salt, you will be able to discern the flavor that cooking wine will provide to your foods. The Chinese consume Shaoxing wine in the same manner that the Japanese use sake.

Link to Make a Purchase

Gold Plum Shaoxing Nuerhong Cooking Wine

When it comes to cooking wine, Shaoxing nuerhong is considered a high-end Shaoxing huadiao wine in the United States market. Nuerhong is the name given to huadiao that has been around for a long time. The most common cooking wine used by many Chinese restaurants in the United States is this kind. It is naturally brewed from the most basic of components, including water, glutinous rice, salt, and caramelized sugar cane juice. First and foremost, Gold Plum is well-known in the Chinese cooking community for their Chinkiang vinegars.

Shaoxing Cooking Wines

These are the standard Shaoxing cooking wines that are available at reasonable prices. If you are unsure about which brand to purchase, these three names are quite popular. Link to Make a Purchase

Chinese Cooking Huangjius

If you find that Shaoxing (huadiao) cooking does not meet your requirements, Chinese yellow cooking wine may be the solution for your problems. When it comes to cooking wine, the Wangzhihe variety is quite popular, while the middle two bottles are produced in Sichuan. Link to Make a Purchase

Fujian Qinghong 3-Year Aged Rice Wine

In addition to Shaoxing cooking wine, Fujian cooking wine, which is prepared from glutinous rice and red rice yearst, is also popular. This Fujian cooking wine has no salt, allowing you to taste it before adding it to your meal preparation. Link to Make a Purchase

Chinese White Cooking Wines Without Salt

There is no salt in these Pearl River Bridge white culinary wines, which have a golden tint on the caps.

As a result, you will be able to taste before adding to the cuisine. Purchase a red cap one at a lower price, but be aware that it contains 1.5 percent salt. Link to Make a Purchase

Chinese Rose Cooking Wine (玫瑰露酒)

Sorghum fermentation produces the most popular cooking wine in the world: Golden Star rose cooking wine. Roasted duck, roasted pork, roasted chicken, and suasages made in the manner of Cantonese cuisine need the use of rose cooking wine as a major element. Some native liquors may offer a salt-free variant that may be consumed as a spirit. Link to Make a Purchase

Taiwan Cooking Michius

If you are unsure which cooking Michiu to get, it is never a bad idea to choose one of the two brands listed above. However, keep in mind that Michiu Tou is stronger when he is under the influence of alcohol. Link to Make a Purchase

Taiwan Michius Made in USA

The majority of Asian retailers provide a variety of sizes to choose from. Link to Make a Purchase

Taiwan Rice Wine Water/Michiu Shui

These Taiwan rice rine waters are produced by reputable companies and are considered to be one of the finest friends to have during the delivery of a child. Link to Make a Purchase

Japanese Mirons

Using Japanese miron instead of Chinese cooking wine would be a fantastic choice if you are looking for a robust sweetness from the miron. Link to Make a Purchase

Cooking Wine

A large number of Chinese recipes include the use of alcohol to improve flavor. In most cases, when a recipe calls for cooking wine, it is referring to Shaoxing wine. Shaoxing wine (, Shaoxing Huang Jiu) is a sort of Huangjiu that literally translates as “yellow wine.” It is produced in the Shaoxing region of China. It is created from fermented rice, has a transparent amber hue, and has an alcohol content ranging from 14 percent to 20 percent (depending on the brand). It has a complex flavor that includes sweet, bitter, sour, and spicy elements, and it is considered a popular beverage in China, particularly for hot winter drinks.

Inmarinade is a term used to describe cooking wine.

By incorporating it into the marinade, it can help to reduce the raw scent of the meat while also infusing the meal with a pleasant flavor.

Alternatives

It can be difficult to find a good Shaoxing wine that does not contain any salt outside of China. Consider Japanese sake and dry sherry as options in this situation. Both work really well in Asian cuisine and can provide a taste that is quite similar. Dry sherry, on the other hand, is more similar to Shaoxing wine, but with a tiny trace of sweetness added in. Sake from Japan is more delicate and gentle in flavor, and it also has a sweet taste. If you have both on hand, use dry sherry in pungent dishes (especially spicy ones) and sake in delicate dishes if you have both on hand (such as dumpling filling, soup, etc.).

If you are making some Asian cuisines, you may be able to substitute cooking wine with a reduced amount of whiskey or Vodka, but this will primarily depend on the recipe you are making. You should only use these substitutions if you are highly knowledgeable with Asian cooking.

Buy

It might be difficult to get a nice Shaoxing wine that is free of salt outside of China’s borders. Consider Japanese sake and dry sherry as options in this scenario. These two ingredients work really well together in Asian cookery and may produce flavors that are strikingly similar. A dry sherry, on the other hand, is more similar to Shaoxing wine in flavor and aroma, with only a little tinge of sweetness. In comparison to other types of sake, Japanese sake is more delicate and gentle, with a somewhat sweet flavor.

We keep sake in the refrigerator at all times since we enjoy drinking it as well.

Use these substitutions only if you have extensive experience with Asian cuisines.

Store

Once opened, Shaoxing wine and dry sherry can be kept in a cold, dark area for a few months before being consumed. If you don’t use it very often, you should keep it in the refrigerator. I like to store opened sake in the refrigerator rather than the freezer since it loses its delicate fragrance much more quickly than other cooking wines.

Secret Ingredient: Shaoxing Wine · i am a food blog

If someone asked me what was in my pantry that was a surprise unsung hero, I would most definitely reply Shaoxing wine, which is a Chinese red wine. Shaoxing wine is a not-so-secret component in all of our Chinese cuisine, and it contributes to the dishes’ original flavor. Remember when you eat Chinese food, whether it’s takeout or fine dining, and it’s so incredibly delicious that you can’t exactly put your finger on what it is? Perhaps you’ve had a sneaking suspicion that it was MSG? Actually, it isn’t; the flavor you’re having trouble identifying is most likely Shaoxing.

What is Shaoxing wine?

Shaoxing is a sort of Chinese rice wine that is made from fermented rice. This wine is known in Chinese as huang jiu, or Shaoxing yellow wine, which translates to “Yellow wine from Shaoxing.” The Shaoxing portion of the name refers to the city of Shaoxing, which is located in the Zhejiang Province and is well-known for its rice wine production. Shaoxing has a very long history, both as an alcoholic beverage and as a cooking wine, and it has been used for both purposes. It’s created by fermenting brown glutinous rice, water, and a trace amount of wheat, among other ingredients.

Do I need it?

Shaoxing is a sort of Chinese rice wine that is made from fermented grains of rice. This wine is known in Chinese as huang jiu, which literally translates to “yellow wine from Shaoxing.” When you hear the word Shaoxing, it refers to the city of Shaoxing in Zhejiang Province, which is known for its rice wine.

As an alcoholic beverage and as a cooking wine, shaoxing has been around for a very long time. Fermented brown glutinous rice, water, and a trace amount of wheat are used to make this beverage. It has a transparent, translucent golden amber color with a slight hint of amber tint.

Shaoxing wine substitute

Dry sherry is the most effective alternative for Shaoxing wine. It can be used as a one-to-one replacement.

Where to buy it

It is available at Asian grocery shops and on the internet. The Asian section in certain well-stocked supermarkets may have it available for purchase there. You could locate a decent unsalted one in a well-stocked liquor shop, depending on the rules in your area.

Should I buy salted or unsalted?

It’s available at Asian grocery shops and on the internet as well. It may be available in the Asian section of some well-stocked supermarkets. Depending on your state’s rules, a well-stocked liquor shop may be the best location to locate a nice unsalted one.

The best Shaoxing wine brand

Our favorite brand of Shaoxing wine is Pagoda Huadiao Rice Wine No Salt, which is available in several varieties. It’s been around for a very long time. On Amazon, you can also get a salted version of the dish. For those who manage to find a good variety at an Asian grocery shop or a liquor store, remember that, as with other things, a more costly bottle usually means a better product, and unsalted is always preferable to salted.

Shaoxing vs mirin

Shaoxing, as compared to mirin, is less sweet and has an entirely distinct flavor profile than mirin. In a pinch, mirin can be substituted for the sake.

Non alcoholic substitutes for Shaoxing wine

If you don’t drink alcohol, I propose substituting chicken broth as a substitute for the wine.

What does it taste like?

It’s difficult to define, but it has a subtle sweetness, a nutty flavor, an earthy flavor, and a complex flavor. It has a wonderful scent about it.

Is it the same as rice wine?

There are so many flavors in this tea that are difficult to explain, but it is gently sweet with nutty undertones and an earthy finish. It has a strong fragrance to me.

How do I store Shaoxing wine?

Store it in a cool, dark location. We store ours in the pantry for easy access. If you have the room, you can keep it in the refrigerator, although it isn’t absolutely required.

What dishes use Shaoxing wine?

Shaoxing is a technique that adds depth and richness to Chinese cuisine. In addition to being used as a marinade or in braises, thyme may also be used as a flavorful component in soup, meat, vegetable dishes, stir-fries, and dumplings. Shaoxing has arrived:

  • Chicken potstickers, Kung pao chicken, char siu, orange chicken, beef and broccoli chow mein, 3 cup chicken, General Tso’s chicken, chili oil wontons, and more. Fried chicken rice
  • Chicken chow mein
  • Soy sauce chicken rice
  • Claypot chicken rice

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