What Is Burgundy Wine? (Correct answer)

  • Burgundy wine is made in the Burgundy region of France. Wines referred to as Burgundys are usually dry red wines that are made using Pinot Noir grapes. These wines generally have full bodied, complex earthy flavors.

Contents

What kind of wine is a Burgundy?

Red Burgundy is wine that is made in the Burgundy region of eastern France using 100% Pinot Noir grapes. That’s right, red Burgundy is just a Pinot Noir. White Burgundy is also made in Burgundy, but, since it is white, it is made from 100% Chardonnay grapes. That’s it.

What is Burgundy wine similar to?

The best substitute that you can use is red wine which is made from Pinot Noir grapes. Since burgundy too is made from Pinot Noir grapes, it will have similar flavors. Some good substitutes for burgundy wine are Merlot and Cabernet. You can also use California or Oregon Pinot Noir too.

Is Burgundy wine the same as cabernet sauvignon?

Meanwhile, Cabernet Sauvignon is the name of a red winegrape and the wines made from this grape. Cabernet is grown all over the world, but not in Burgundy. Burgundy is best known for its reds made from Pinot Noir and the whites made from Chardonnay.

How would you describe a Burgundy wine?

In general, however, it can be said that red Burgundy imparts flavors of raspberry, blackberry, cherry, and even some spices or gamey flavors in older varieties. The finest Burgundies often have the most floral and delicate aromas. Of course, the most defining tasting characteristic of any Burgundy wine is its terroir.

Is Burgundy a sweet wine?

Wines referred to as Burgundys are usually dry red wines that are made using Pinot Noir grapes. These wines generally have full bodied, complex earthy flavors.

Is Merlot a burgundy wine?

Merlot is not a burgundy wine. It is a bordeaux wine. In the Burgundy region in France the primary varietals grown are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Merlot is one of the Bordeaux varietals and there is usually some Merlot in most all Bordeaux wines.

Is Shiraz a burgundy wine?

The quick answer is neither. Shiraz is the name of a grape (also known as Syrah), and you’ll see that name on some bottles of wine made from that grape. Like the Rhône Valley, Burgundy and Bordeaux are both wine regions in France, but Shiraz/Syrah grapes are not grown in either of those two regions.

Is Beaujolais a burgundy wine?

The French wine region of Beaujolais has long been considered part of Burgundy, but today it charts its own course. The more serious crus designations of Beaujolais drink a lot like red Burgundy.

What’s another name for burgundy wine?

Burgundy is the name of a wine region in France, and refers to the wines made from this region. The terms actually overlap quite a bit— Pinot Noir is the primary red wine grape grown in Burgundy, so if someone’s referring to a red Burgundy, they are talking about a Pinot Noir.

Is Merlot and Burgundy the same color?

Merlot, marsala, burgundy, maroon. In essence, the color is a deep purplish red. Interestingly, these merlot shades share the same blue undertones as berry, burgundy, and plum. This makes the hues very similar and easy to mix when wearing!

Is a Bordeaux similar to a Burgundy?

Bordeaux also tends to be big and bold in flavor, unlike Burgundy, which is made from the thin-skinned, finicky pinot noir grape. The stylistic differences in the wines are mirrored in the very different vibes of the two regions. Bordeaux abounds in vast estates fronted by big, showcase châteaux.

What grape is white Bordeaux?

The grapes of White Bordeaux include Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon and Muscadelle. There are a few other less-known varieties used in White Bordeaux such as Colombard and Ugni Blanc (the grape used in Cognac), but most White Bordeaux are made of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc.

What does old Burgundy taste like?

Red Burgundy at this age can be extremely enjoyable, with a Technicolor vibrancy of flavor few other wines can match in their immediate youth. The wines will have little-to-no savory aromas, but the vivid nature of their pure fruit and floral aromas can be extremely appealing.

What grape is Sancerre?

The region is best known for its crisp white wines, which are crafted entirely from sauvignon blanc. Although white wine accounts for approximately 80% of the region’s production, small amounts of red wine are made in Sancerre, produced from 100% pinot noir.

A Simple Guide to Burgundy Wine (with Maps)

Want to feel more confident while purchasing Burgundy wine? This short reference includes maps, infographics, and the most important statistics about Burgundy’s five major sub-regions, as well as a brief history of the region. Understand the differences between the best places for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Guide to Burgundy Wine Regions

The French wine region of Burgundy (sometimes known as “Bourgogne”) may be modest in geographical extent, but its effect on the world of wine is enormous. Burgundy’s intricacy might strike dread into the hearts of even the most experienced wine professional, but worry not – the area only needs to be as complicated as you want it to be. Yes, it is home to some of the most costly wines on the face of the planet, but it also has some delicious and reasonably priced options.

Just The Facts

The quickest approach to get your head around Burgundy is to realize that there are only two grape varietals to remember: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

Pinot Noir and Chardonnay

There are others, of course, such as Aligoté, Pinot Gris, Gamay, and Sauvignon Blanc, but Pinot Noir forBourgogne Rouge and Chardonnay forBourgogne Blanc remain the primary emphasis of Burgundy’s production. Accordin to the Burgundyvigneron (winemaker), the area is not only the birthplace of these grapes, but it is also theterroir (pronounced “tear-wah”) that best reflects their character, which is elegant, fragrant, and nuanced. Purchase the book and receive the course! With the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition, you will receive a FREE copy of the Wine 101 Course (a $50 value).

Terroir is the result of a symbiotic relationship between grapes, soil, climate, vineyard site, and human touch, all bundled into a single concept.

Where Exactly is Burgundy?

Others, of course, such as Aligoté, Pinot Gris, Gamay, and Sauvignon Blanc are grown in Burgundy, but Pinot Noir forBourgogne Rouge and Chardonnay forBourgogne Blanc are the major focus of the region’s winemaking activities. Winemakers in the Burgundy area believe that the region is not only the birthplace of these grapes, but also the terroir (pronounced “tear-wah”) that best displays their character — delicate, fragrant, and nuanced. You can get the course if you buy the book! Wine Folly: Magnum Edition includes a complimentary copy of the Wine 101 Course, a $50 value.

Terroir is the result of a symbiotic relationship between grapes, soil, climate, vineyard layout, and human touch, all packaged into a single package.

  • Chablis is pronounced “shab-lee”
  • Côte de Nuits is pronounced “night slope,” Côte de Beaune is pronounced “Beaune slope,” and Côte Chalonnaise is pronounced “Chalon slope.” Mâconnais –the territory around Mâcon
  • Mâcon, France

Burgundy Wine Map

Paul’s fossilized limestone specimen Approximately 200 million years ago, the area was a part of a massive tropical sea that covered the whole planet. The seafloor was turned into limestone soils throughout time. These soils are the source of the zesty minerality that distinguishes Burgundy wines and gives them their distinctive character. In the vineyards, you can discover slabs of limestone or marl (limestone combined with clay) that hold intriguing fossilized marine animals if you go exploring.

These gentlemen tended the vineyards for the sake of the church and the aristocratic Dukes of Burgundy.

The French Revolution restored the vineyards to the people, who now take great satisfaction in their ties to the land that they have cultivated. Growth in organic and biodynamic viticulture and winemaking has been spurred on by people’s intimate relationships with the land.

Chablis

“It’s known for its lean, unoaked Chardonnay.” Chablis is the wine-growing area in Burgundy that is the furthest north and is physically separated from the rest of the region. Located near the town of Serein, where the river Serein (Serene) runs through the land, regulating the temperature, grapes have been farmed here since the Cistercian monks first planted vines here in the 12th century. In truth, it’s closer to Champagne in terms of both location and environment, with hard, cold winters, spring frost, and scorching summers similar to those of the Champagne region.

Its white, chalky texture is excellent at absorbing and reflecting the warmth of the sun, which is desperately required thus far north.

More Information about Chablis

Côte de Nuits

“It is well-known for its Pinot Noir.” There are 24 Grand Cru vineyards on the Côte de Nuits (called after walnut trees), which also contains some of the most costly vineyard real estate in the world. Corgoloin is a hamlet located just south of Dijon in the region known as the Corgoloin. Pinot Noir accounts for 80 percent of the wines produced here, with the remaining 20 percent consisting primarily of Chardonnay and Rosé, which is a specialty of Marsannay. Starting in the hamlet of Gevery Chambertin and continuing south to Vougeot and Vosne Romanée, the Grand Cru vineyards create a patchwork over the eastern slopes of the Saône River valley, beginning at the village of Gevery Chambertin and ending at Morey St-Denis.

These legendary expressions of Pinot Noir may age for decades – and it may take that long to save up the money to purchase them, given that costs can quickly reach into the thousands.

Several Côte de Nuits Village wines, including Fixin, Brochon, Premeaux, Comblanchien, and Corgolin, should be sampled.

As well as being exceptional values, offerings in the Premier Cru category may also be excellent choices for special occasions.

Côte de Beaune

Known for its opulent Chardonnay While the Côte de Beaune is named after the medieval municipality that serves as the focal point of Burgundy’s wine industry, the wine produced in this region is considerably distinct from that produced in its neighbor to the north, the Cote de Beaune. Valleys are wide and rolling, vines have a southeasterly exposure, and Chardonnay plays a more major role, with 7 of the 8 Grand Cru vineyards producing white wine – Corton, Charlemagne, Montrachet (literal translation: Bald Mountain) are just a few of the well-known names.

Again, you are not need to mortgage your farm in order to enjoy the great wines produced in this region.

Buying Tip:

The Côte de Beaune Village and the Premier Cru from the region are two places to look out for.

  • The Côte de Beaune Village and the Premier Cru from the region are two places to look for wines.

The fragrances of delicate white flowers, dry grasses, fresh apple and pear, and perhaps a hint of hazelnut permeate the air around the whites. There are also some fantastic red wines to be found. The wines include notes of plum, cherrystone, white tobacco, as well as the earthy minerality and excellent acidity that are characteristic of Burgundy.

In The Know

The Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune are collectively referred to as the Côte d’Or. Côte d’Or is French for “Golden Slope.” The Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune have traditionally been regarded as the most significant wine-growing districts in Burgundy.

Côte Chalonnaise

“It’s a great place to find affordable Pinot Noir and sparkling Crémant.” As we continue our journey across Burgundy, we will stop at the Côte Chalonnaise, which is located in between the cities of Chagny and Saint-Vallerin. There are no Grand Cru vineyards in this region. Due to their central location in Dijon, the Dukes of Burgundy preferred to maintain their assets close to home. Their perception was that these locations to the south were more agricultural and inhabited by peasants. What a pity, because they were missing out on some very exceptional wines!

  1. This is a refreshing summer sipper that is also a good match for fish and shellfish.
  2. Delicious.
  3. In the Côte Chalonnaise, the air is crisp and fresh.
  4. The area around Givry, which is located in the heart of the Chalonnaise, contains about 13 different types of soil.
  5. The wines from this region are reasonably priced.

Mâconnais

“An excellent value for money Chardonnay.” The Mâconnais is the most southerly and biggest of Burgundy’s regions, and it is also the most populous. This region was once considered to be “average,” but now it is considered to be the “rogue” of the family. It was this region that was most hit during difficult periods such as the worldwide slump of the 1920s and the two World Wars that occurred between them. Many of the local grape producers were forced to sell their grapes to co-operatives in order to stay afloat.

  1. The farmers knew that they needed to enhance their wines if they wanted to remain competitive in the marketplace.
  2. A crossroads between Northern and Southern France, it is located between the cities of Tournus and St.
  3. The transformation is dramatic.
  4. In addition, the environment is much warmer; in fact, harvest begins here two weeks earlier than in Chablis, which is a significant advantage.
  5. Despite the fact that it was only designated as an appellation in 1999, great wines have been produced in this region for generations.
  6. Pouilly-Fuissé is the most important and well-known area in the region’s south.
  7. The neighboring settlements were located at the bottom of the valley, in the shadow of the mountains of Mont Solutré and Mont Vergisson.

The soils around here are rich in limestone, with a small amount of granite thrown in for good measure. The wines are white, created from Chardonnay, and have delicate aromas of apple, pineapple, and white peach, as well as excellent structure and freshness, and they are delicious.

Burgundy Wine Classifications

Understanding how Burgundy’s Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are categorized will help you find higher-quality bottles of the wines. In total, there are approximately 100 “appellations,” or designated wine growing zones, in the world, which are split into four quality levels.

  • A one-percent Grand Cru (for example, Grands-Echézeaux, Montrachet, etc.) Wines from the best vineyards in Burgundy (calledclimats). There are 33 Grand Crus on the Côte d’Or, and Pinot Noir accounts for around 60% of the region’s total production. Premier Cru (for example, Vosne Romanée 1er Cru) accounts for 10% of total production. Burgundy wines produced in climates that are remarkable. In Burgundy, there are a total of 640 Premier Cru plots. Village Wines account for 37% of total sales. Burgundy wines that come from a certain village or commune. Chablis, Nuits-St.-Georges, and Mâcon-Villages are among the 44 villages in the region
  • 52 percent of the wine produced comes from regional grapes (e.g. Crémant de Bourgogne, Bourgogne Rouge, etc.). Wines from the Bourgogne appellations that span the entire region
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Regional Wines

The wine produced from grapes cultivated anywhere in Burgundy is known as a regional wine. Regional wines are known for being fresh, light, and vivacious, making them excellent sipping or aperitif wines. You will see them branded “Bourgogne Rouge” (red) or “Bourgogne Blanc” (white) on the shelves (white). Do not forget to read the back label on these wines as well. They are now permitted to make a note on the grape variety, which might be quite beneficial. If sparkling wines are your thing, the exquisite “Crément de Bourgogne” is also included in this grouping.

Village Wines

The “Village” wines, which are called after the villages in the vicinity of where the grapes are obtained, represent the next level of sophistication. Despite the fact that these wines are still fresh and fruity and contain little to no oak, they are a touch more complex in flavor. Look for names like “Pouilly-Fuissé,” “Santenay,” “Givry,” or “Mercurey” in the list of candidates.

Premier Cru Burgundy

Wines from “Premier Cru” vineyards are those that come from specific vineyard sections within a community. Climats (pronounced “climats”) are little sections of vineyard that create wines that are a little more robust than the usual old Village wines! This might be due to the kind of soil, the orientation of the vineyard in relation to the morning sun, the lengthier age in oak, or any number of other factors. Premier Crus are still reasonably priced, and they make excellent food wines. “Premier Cru” or “1er Cru” will be written on the label.

Grand Cru Burgundy

Finally, there are the “Grand Cru” wines of Bourgogne, which include well-known names like as Romanée Conti, La Tâche, Montrachet, and others, as well as a label that will boldly declare its “Grand Cru” designation! The wines in this category represent less than one percent of Burgundy’s yearly output, but they are the ones for which consumers are ready to pay a premium to obtain them. They are the essence of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, being bold, robust, complex, and meant to be aged in the cellar.

In Burgundy, the most essential thing I’ve learnt is that there are always exceptions to any rule– and here’s one that I’ve come across: Remember the several types of wine categories that apply to Burgundy?

The region well renowned for its zesty Chardonnay has developed its own grading system.

Chablis Classification System

A wine made from grapes harvested in the surrounding area of the village, Petit Chablis is stronger in acidity and has a lot of mild citrus flavour, making it a refreshing summer drink. These are best enjoyed while they are young, so check for recently released vintages. Using grapes from the limestone hills near the hamlet of Chablis, these wines are a little rounder and more minerally in flavor than their Burgundy counterparts. This is the category in which the vast majority of the wines that we see on our local stores fall.

Take note to climatic designations such as “Mont de Milieu” (“Mount in the center”), “Côte de Léchet” (very zesty), or “Fourchaume” that appear on the label (fruity).

There is only one Grand Cru, but there are seven “climats” within that Grand Cru, and their names will be printed on the label: Blanchot, Bougros, Les Clos, Grenouilles, Presuses, Valmur, and Vaudésir.

The Grand Cru wines of Chablis might have a distinct flavor from the rest of the region’s wines, mostly due to the fact that many of them are matured in oak barrels.

In the Grand Cru vineyards, the wines develop flowery honey flavors and a crisp acidity, which makes them excellent for aging in oak barrels.

White Burgundy Wine Guide

Learn the secrets of some of the world’s most prestigious Chardonnay vineyards. Read on to find out more

Burgundy – A Guide To Burgundy Wines

Despite the fact that Burgundy is the name of a wine-producing area in France, the majority of us are familiar with the word not because of high school geography, but because it is what we call the famed red and white wine that the region produces. Due to the fact that these wines are considered to be among the finest available for purchase, they are among the most costly in the world. Prior to explaining why so many people feel this way, we’ll provide a quick overview of the red and white Burgundy grape varieties.

  1. That’s true, red Burgundy is nothing more than a varietal of Pinot Noir.
  2. That’s all there is to it.
  3. Burgundy has earned a reputation as the world’s premier producer of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay over the course of many hundred years of history.
  4. One of the things that distinguishes both Burgundian wines is the fact that Burgundy, maybe more than any other wine area in the world, is entirely impacted by its terroir.
  5. Terroir is the belief that the area on which the grapes are cultivated adds a distinct character to the grapes that is peculiar to that particular vineyard, to put it simply.
  6. This Grand Cru is one of the most famous and costly wines in the world, and it is also one of the most expensive.
  7. As a result, vineyards in the Burgundy region are classified into four categories based on how exceptional it is believed that one’s plot of land is for growing grapes.
  8. When purchasing a bottle of Burgundy, you will see that the bottle will be branded with one of the following four classifications:
  • A wine area in France with that name
  • Yet, the majority of us are familiar with it not because we learned about it in high school geography, but because it’s the word we use to describe the famed red and white wines produced by the region. These wines are often regarded as some of the best money can buy, which explains why they are among the most costly in the world, according to some estimates. But first, we’ll go through the basics of red and white Burgundy to help you understand why so many people feel this way. Pinot Noir grapes are used to produce red Burgundy wine, which is produced in the Burgundy area in eastern France. Red Burgundy is, in fact, a kind of Pinot Noir. White Burgundy is also produced in Burgundy, but because it is white, it must be made entirely of Chardonnay grapes, as is the case with red Burgundies. Everything has been spoken and done. Quite straightforward, don’t you think? Burgundy has earned a reputation as the world’s premier producer of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay over the course of several centuries of wine production. Assuming, for the time being, that both red Burgundy and white Burgundy are merely different names for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, let’s look at what makes these wines so much more desirable than versions of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from other regions of the world. One of the things that distinguishes both Burgundian wines is the fact that Burgundy, maybe more than any other wine area in the world, is totally shaped by its terroir. Terroir is a feeling of place, which implies that when you drink a wine, you can taste the entire region in which it was produced. Terroir is the belief that the area on which the grapes are cultivated lends a distinct character to the grapes that is peculiar to that particular vineyard, to put it another way. Romanée-Conti vineyard is denoted with a cross on the ground. In terms of fame and price, this Grand Cru is among the most costly and sought-after wines on the market today. It has been said over the years that Burgundy is the greatest wine-producing region in the world for both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, and it is for this reason that Burgundy wines have garnered such widespread praise. As a result, vineyards in the Burgundy region are classified into four categories based on how exceptional it is believed one’s plot of land is for growing grapes. The quality of the land is considered so important to the creation of red and white Burgundy that within the region, vineyards are classified into four categories. In order to identify a bottle of Burgundy, it will be labeled with one of the following four classifications:

A wine area in France with that name; yet, the majority of us are familiar with it not because we learned about it in high school geography, but because it’s the word we use to describe the famed red and white wines produced in the region. Due to the fact that these wines are believed to be among the best money can buy, they are among the most costly in the world. But first, let’s take a quick look at what red and white Burgundy are and why so many people like them. Red Burgundy is a kind of wine produced in the Burgundy area of eastern France from grapes that are 100 percent Pinot Noir.

  • White Burgundy is also produced in Burgundy, but because wine is white, it must be made entirely from Chardonnay grapes.
  • Isn’t it rather straightforward?
  • So, now that we’ve established that both red Burgundy and white Burgundy are merely alternative names for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, let’s look at what makes these wines so much more desirable than versions of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from other regions of the world.
  • Terroir is a feeling of place, which implies that when you drink a wine, you can taste the entire region in which the wine was produced.
  • The Romanée-Conti vineyard is marked by a cross.
  • Burgundy has earned a reputation as the world’s premier producer of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay throughout the years, and it is for this reason that Burgundy wines have won widespread recognition.
  • In fact, the quality of the land is considered so important to the creation of red and white Burgundy that, within the region, vineyards are classified into four categories based on how exceptional they believe their plot of land is for growing grapes.

When purchasing a bottle of Burgundy, look for one of the following four classifications on the label:

Keep Reading About Burgundy

  • Burgundy is the name of a wine-producing area in France
  • However, most of us are familiar with the word not because of high school geography, but because it is what we call the famed red and white wine that the region produces. These wines are often regarded as some of the best money can buy, which explains why they are among the most costly in the world. But first, we’ll go over what red and white Burgundy are and why so many people like them. Red Burgundy is a wine produced in the Burgundy region of eastern France from grapes that are 100 percent Pinot Noir. That’s true, red Burgundy is nothing more than a variation on the Pinot Noir grape. White Burgundy is also produced in Burgundy, but because wine is white, it is made entirely of Chardonnay grapes. That’s the end of it. Isn’t it quite straightforward? Burgundy has earned a reputation as the world’s premier producer of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay throughout the years. Now that we’ve established that both red Burgundy and white Burgundy are merely alternative names for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, let’s look at what makes these wines so much more desirable than versions of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from other regions of the world. What distinguishes both Burgundian wines is the fact that Burgundy, more than any other wine area in the world, is entirely impacted by its terroir. Terroir is a feeling of place, which implies that when you drink a wine, you can taste the entire region where the wine was produced. Terroir, put simply, is the belief that the land on which the grapes are cultivated gives a distinct character that is peculiar to that particular vineyard. The Romanée-Conti vineyard is denoted with a cross. This Grand Cru is one of the most renowned and costly wines in the world. Over the years, Burgundy has earned a reputation as the world’s premier producer of both Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, and it is for this reason that Burgundy wines have won widespread recognition. In fact, the quality of the land is thought to be so vital to the manufacture of red and white Burgundy that within the Burgundy area, vineyards are classed into four categories based on how excellent it is deemed one’s piece of land is for producing grapes. When purchasing a bottle of Burgundy, look for one of these four designations on the label of the bottle:

A Guide to Red and White Burgundy Wine

Wine collections exist in a variety of shapes and sizes, ranging from those devoted to Bordeaux, Chianti, or Rioja wines to those devoted to Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, or Riesling. While some wine enthusiasts stick to their tried-and-true favorites, others choose to branch out with intriguing new discoveries, such as red and white Burgundy, to keep things interesting. Burgundy wines have a high level of complexity and are divided into two categories: red Burgundy, which is made entirely of Pinot Noir, and white Burgundy, which is made entirely of Chardonnay.

Learning about Burgundy’s appellational variances and how these characteristics translate to the completed product can take years, if not decades, for wine specialists to master the subject.

The Burgundy Wine Region

The Burgundy wine region, which is located in east-central France, is well suited for producing exceptional terroir-driven wines. On the slopes and valleys of the Saone River, which offers a unique blend of oceanic, Mediterranean, and continental climates, the majority of the wine areas may be found, as can be seen below. Several of the areas begin in Dijon and go southward to Lyon, as well as the more isolated Chablis region in the northwest corner of the country. In total, there are five major expanding regions in the world.

Interestingly, despite the fact that the Burgundy area is about one-fifth the size of the Bordeaux region, it contains approximately 74,000 acres of excellent vineyards.

Producing Exceptional Wines

Burgundy is home to some of the world’s greatest wines, with well-known brands like as Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, Leflaive, and Georges Roumier among those who seek them out. The soils of the Burgundy area are rich in nutrients, making them excellent for the cultivation of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes. From the marl limestone that Pinot Noir prefers to the clay-marl limestone that Chardonnay prefers, the soils in Burgundy are well suited to the task of producing grapes of the best quality.

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It has been well documented that winemakers have long understood how to make the most of these exceptional soils and favorable climatic conditions.

The northerly breeze and appropriate rainfall ensure that the grapes grow lush and healthy without being burdened by excessive water.

A Look at Burgundy’s Five Main Growing Regions

Burgundy stretches across a broad range of valleys and hills, each with its own microclimate among its five main growing districts. In contrast to other areas of France, where appellations are associated with a certain producer, Burgundian appellations are associated with specific vineyards.

There are a total of 84 appellations spread among the region’s vineyards. Because of the variety of soil types, light exposure, and other characteristics, any given vineyard might have many appellations associated with it — often within inches of each other!

Chablis

Vineyards may be found in the Serein Valley, which is characterized by chalky limestone slopes. Aside from the Chardonnays produced in the Cote de Beaune, you’ll find this location to be suitable for producing high-quality Chardonnay. Premier Cru and Grand Cru wines are produced in Chablis by winemakers like as Francois Raveneau, William Fevre, Christian Moreau, and Vincent Dauvissat, amongst others.

Cote de Nuits

The Cote de Nuits vineyards, which are located just south of Dijon, are renowned for producing high-quality Pinot Noir wines. Romanee-Conti, Musigny, Clos de Lambrays, and Clos Saint-Denis are just a few of the names you’ll come across. Pinot Noir grapes account for approximately 80% of all wines produced, with the remaining 20% made from Chardonnay grapes.

Cote de Beaune

The Cote de Beaune, which stretches from Beaune to Chagny, is located just south of the Cote de Nuits. While Nuits-Saint-Georges is famed for its red wines, Beaune is known for its whites. You’ll find Premier Cru and Grand Cru appellations like as Charlemagne, Montrachet, Criots-Batard-Montrachet, and Meursault, as well as some lesser-known vineyards.

Cote Chalonnaise

This area, which stretches from Chagny to Montagny, is characterized by softer slopes and a lot of southern exposure. There are numerous superb red and white Burgundies to be found in this region, including Leroy Montagny, Faiveley Mercurey, and Philippe-Le-Hardi, among others.

Maconnais

This southern area is recognized for producing lush Chardonnays that are also more cheap. In terms of climate, things are certainly more Mediterranean here, with fruit ripening occurring sooner than in more northern places. Chardonnays from appellations like as Pouilly-Fuisse, Vire-Classe, and Saint-Veran are known for their rich flowery bouquets.

Understanding the Four Burgundy Classifications

What distinguishes a wine as a Premier Cru or Grand Cru, as well as the several other categories, are discussed here. It’s all about location, location, location, as the phrase goes.

Grand Cru

Grand Cru wines, which are the cream of the harvest, are produced from vineyards of the greatest quality. It is because they have the greatest location, the best soils, the best exposure to light, and the finest nutrients that they are able to produce the Burgundy wine that is best suited to maturing and long-term storage. Grand Cru wines account for around 2 percent of total Burgundy production, and because of their restricted quantity, there is a constant demand for them. On the label of these wines are the name of the vineyard as well as the words “Grand Cru.”

Premier Cru

Premier Cru wines are not made from grapes grown in their own vineyard or from grapes grown in their own appellation. A vineyard’s better parts, known as “climats,” are where these grapes are sourced from. These climats have demonstrated stability and quality across time, appearing in all parts of the world.

These wines account for around 12 percent of total output in Burgundy. Premier Cru wine labels are distinguished by the inclusion of the village’s name as well as the terms “Premier Cru” or “1er Cru.” Some wines are labeled with the name of the vineyard as well.

Village

Village wines, which are far more popular in Burgundy, are produced in individual villages around the area. There are 44 village appellations in Burgundy, and village wines account for 36% of the total production of the region. Village wines are distinguished by the inclusion of the village’s name on the label.

Regional

In addition, regional wines are sourced from vineyards located around the Burgundy region. These wines are frequently made with grapes from certain villages in specific regions (such as Cote de Nuits or Maconnais), although they can also be made with grapes obtained from anywhere in Burgundy. Regional wines account for around 50% of total output. Bourgogne Rouge and Blanc are two examples of appellations that may appear on wine labels, however a subregion of numerous appellations may also appear on labels.

What Is Red Burgundy?

Red Burgundy is composed entirely of Pinot Noir grapes, as is white Burgundy. The Pinot Noir grape variety is regarded to be indigenous to the region, making Burgundy one of the greatest sites in the world for creating the complexity that this grape is known for producing. Red Burgundy and Pinot Noir are genuinely synonymous in this region; despite the fact that Pinot Noir grapes are grown in other countries, the wines produced by these grapes are seldom referred to as Burgundy; instead, the phrase “Burgundian style” is frequently used.

The Cote de Nuits and the Cote Chalonnaise are the two best-growing regions for red wines out of the five available.

JJ Buckley Fine Wines Recommendations – Red Burgundy

So, are you ready to add these high-end wines to your collection? Here is a selection of five outstanding red Burgundy wines that we’ve hand-picked for you.

  1. 2014 Domaine de la Pousse d’Or Chambolle Musigny Les Feusselottes
  2. 2011 Domaine Jean Grivot Vosne Romanee les Chaumes
  3. 2014 Henri Gouges Nuits St Georges les Pruliers
  4. 2012 Faiveley Pommard
  5. 2013 Louis Jadot Gevrey Chambertin Estournelles St Jacques The Rugiens are a group of mercenaries that operate in the southwestern United States.

What Is White Burgundy?

White Burgundy is made entirely of Chardonnay grapes, which are a hybrid between the Pinot Noir and Gouais Blanc types that has been around for decades. Chardonnay, like Pinot Noir and red Burgundy, is a varietal that is closely associated with the region. If you’re searching for a white Burgundy, Chardonnay is the grape variety to hunt for. The white Burgundy grape accounts for around 60% of total wine output in the Burgundy area. Three of France’s five growing regions produce the greatest white wines: the Cote de Beaune, Chablis, and Maconnais.

JJ Buckley Fine Wines Recommendations – White Burgundy

In the case that you like white Burgundy, you’ll appreciate our carefully crafted list of five great Chardonnays from the region.

  1. 2015 Domaine Leflaive Meursault Sous le Dos d’Ane
  2. 2016 Bouchard Pere et Fils Puligny Montrachet Les Champs Gain
  3. 2015 Domaine Marc Morey Chassagne Montrachet Morgeot
  4. 2016 Domaine William Fevre Chablis Montmains
  5. 2013 Louis Jadot Beaune Greves Le Clos Blanc
  6. 2013 Domaine William Fevre Chablis Montmains
  7. 2013 Domaine Marc Morey

Whether you’re familiar with Bourgogne Rouge and Bourgogne Blanc or not, you’ll enjoy browsing through our extensive choice of some of the greatest Burgundy wines.

If you want further information or have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact our wine specialists here at JJ Buckley Fine Wines.

When a recipe calls for “Burgundy,” do they just mean Pinot Noir?

Even if you’re unfamiliar with Bourgogne Rouge and Bourgogne Blanc, you’ll have a great time browsing our whole range, which includes some of the greatest Burgundy wines available. Contact our wine specialists at JJ Buckley Fine Wines if you want further information or have any inquiries.

Burgundy wine

Burgundy wine is any of the several wines produced in the Burgundy area of eastern-central France. In addition to those in the Chablis district, those in the Côte de Nuits just south of Dijon, the area surrounding Beaune and Mâcon, and the Beaujolais district just north of Lyons are also home to vineyards. Burgundy is a region that produces a variety of wines rather than a single type of wine. Its white wines are typically dry, whilst its red wines are velvety and full-bodied in texture. In Burgundy, the most often planted grape types are chardonnay, aligoté, and pinot blanc, which are used to create white wines; pinot noir and gamay, which are used to produce red wines.

Burgundy-style wines produced in other countries, such as Italy, Spain, Chile, or the United States (California), attempt to replicate some of the characteristics of Burgundy wines with varied degrees of success.

The usage of district names, such as Côtes de Beaune, as well as the names of communes, villages, and individual vineyards, are all strictly regulated, as are the names of individual vineyards.

Estate-bottled wines are the most expensive wines available.

Yonne

It is the Yonne district, which is located in the northeastern section of the Burgundy wine region, that is most well-known for its production of white wines. The world-famousChablisis a very dry white wine that is light and has a delicate fragrance; only wines from certain locations in the Yonne are permitted to have the designation Chablis.

Côtes-d’Or

This region is separated into two parts: the Côte de Nuits, which is located directly south of Dijon, and the Côte de Beaune, which is located farther south. The Côte de Nuits is mostly known for its red wines, which are produced in large quantities. The Côte de Beaune is home to the production of both red and white wines, including the majority of the top white Burgundies.

Saône-et-Loire

Grape harvesting is a common practice in the Saône-et-Loire area, but it is less distinctive than grape harvesting in the other districts of the Burgundy region.

Mercurey and Givry are two highly regarded red wines. Whites of excellent quality may be found in and around Mâcon, including Rully, Montagny, and Pouilly-Fuissé, a dry, heady wine with a complex fragrance.

Rhône

The Rhône Valley is notably well-known for itsBeaujolais, a delicious and fruity wine produced in the region. Made from the Gamay grape, which in other regions yields a big but low-quality production, this wine is distinctive. It’s a bunch of drunken kids. Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Kara Rogers has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

A Basic Guide to Burgundy Wine by Leah

In my prior work as a French wine ambassador for Visit French Wine, I traveled to Cognac and the Loire Valley, among other places. This year’s vacation took me to Burgundy, the world’s most prominent wine-producing area, where I spent the most of my time. I’m not trying to be unfair. Burgundy produces seven of the world’s ten most costly wines, making it the most expensive region in the world. In addition, 32 of the top 50 most expensive bottles are sourced from this region. In spite of its enviable reputation, wine in Burgundy isn’t simply for those looking to spend $15,000 on a single vineyard’s Grand Cru from Domaine de la Romanée-Conti.

Whether you’re planning a vacation to the region or simply visiting a local wine shop, you’ll find my simple reference to Burgundy wine to be really useful!

History of Wine in Burgundy

A simple guide on Burgundywine would be inadequate if it did not include a brief history of the wine. Burgundy was covered by a sea a couple million years ago, which resulted in the formation of its limestone and marlsoils. Burgundian wines are renowned for their minerality, which is derived from the soil makeup of the region. Burgundy has a lengthy and illustrious wine heritage that dates back to around 50 BC. When the Romans invaded Burgundy, it is thought that the Celts were already making wine there, according to legend.

  • Around 900, Benedictine monks controlled and farmed much of the region’s soil, but it was the Cistercian monks, more than two hundred years later, who raised the skill of making Burgundian wines to a higher level.
  • It helped that they were cultivating on the stony Burgundian hillsides, but the monks also adopted an academic approach to winemaking.
  • The earliest enclosed Burgundian vineyard, which is still in operation today, was established by the Cistercians in 1336.
  • The Pinot Noir wine was so popular that Duke Phillipe forbade the cultivation of Gamay grapes in 1395, citing health concerns.
  • Burgundy became a part of France in the late 15th century, while the country was still a monarchy.
  • Because of the Code Napoléon, the land has been split several times over the course of several generations.

This regulation mandated that inheritances be distributed equally among all of the children in the family. Today, it is not uncommon for a chateau to have hundreds of proprietors, each with only a few rows of land to their name.

Main Grapes of Burgundy

Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are the two most important varieties of grapes cultivated in Burgundy: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Burgundy is the birthplace of Pinot Noir, and its vineyards span 34 percent of the region’s land area, accounting for 29 percent of the region’s total wine output. The red grape grows exceptionally well on limestone and clay soil, which contributes to the richness of the fruit. These light-bodied Pinot Noir wines from Burgundy range in color from cherry to brick and contain characteristics of red fruit and spices in their bouquet and palate.

Chardonnay is the most important grape for white wines in Burgundy, accounting for 48 percent of the vineyards and 68 percent of the wine produced there.

Aligoté is the second most often cultivated white grape, accounting for 6 percent of total production.

This wine can be created from Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Aligoté, Gamay, Sacy, and Melon grapes, among other varieties.

Wine-Producing Regions of Burgundy

A 93-mile-long wine region located around two hours southeast of Paris, Burgundy accounts for only 3% of total French wine output and is located approximately two hours southeast of Paris. Chablis and Grand Auxerrois are the two Burgundy villages that are the closest to Paris, located in the northwest part of the country. In addition to two AOC categories, which are split by the Serein River, Chablis wines are created entirely of Chardonnay grapes and are produced only in the region of Chablis.

  1. Grand Auxerrois is a diversified region composed of four distinct areas: Auxerrois, Vézelien, Jovinien, and Tonnerrois.
  2. Auxerrois makes white wine mostly from Chardonnay and Aligoté grapes, and red wine primarily from Pinot Noir and Gamay grapes.
  3. While this region is home to the vast bulk of Burgundy’s Grand Cru vineyards, it also produces a minor amount of white and rosé wine.
  4. The Côte de Beaune, which stretches for 12 miles along the Rhone River, is yet another jewel in the crown of wine-growing splendor.
  5. In fact, the Côte de Beaune is home to seven of the eight Grand Crus of white wine.
  6. In addition to Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, Aligoté is also used in the production of this wine.

Mâconnaise is a commune in the south of Burgundy, sandwiched between two valleys. The 22-mile-long strip of land between Sennecey-le-Grand and Saint-Vérand is predominantly planted with Chardonnay grapes, with a small amount of Gamay thrown in for good measure.

Wine Classifications of Burgundy

When selecting French wines, it is critical to be able to interpret the labels on the bottles. Aside from the producer and vintage, the quality of a bottle of wine may frequently be established by just reading the label on the bottle. Grand Cru is the highest of Burgundy’s four categories, and it is the best. Grand Crus, which literally translates as ‘great growth,’ are the best wines produced in Burgundy and account for only 1.3 percent of total output. Premier Crus are the second finest classification and account for 9.3 percent of all wines produced in Burgundy.

  1. Regional applications account for 51.3 percent of the officially classed wines at the end of the process.
  2. This information will assist you in selecting a Burgundian wine from a shop or from a menu that is appropriate for your palate preferences.
  3. Don’t forget to sign up for Cristina Otel’s Burgundy Wine School class while you’re in France.
  4. Cheers!
  5. Leah Goes on Adventures All credit goes to Leah Walker of Leah Travels for this photo.
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Burgundy Wine Regions – Wines of France

In Burgundy, the terroir is king, according to CIVB. Burgundy (also known as “Bourgogne” in French) is a historic and well regarded wine-producing area located in eastern France. Since the beginning of time, Burgundy wines have gathered a devoted following around the world, and this is still the case today. Despite the fact that Bordeaux produces around four times the amount of wine produced in Burgundy each year, the region’s estimated 30,000 hectares (74,000 acres) of vines are regarded to be of similar importance, producing some of the most unique wines produced on the planet.

  • Located in the heart of Burgundy, in a short strip that stretches about 120 kilometers (75 miles) between the towns of Dijon and Mâcon, four of them are of particular interest.
  • As a result of its location in an isolated enclave of limestone hills in north-western Burgundy, Chablis produces white wines that are so unique in character from those produced in central Burgundy that it is sometimes classified as a separate area.
  • Burgundy’s two most important grape types are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, both of which are part of the wider ‘Pinot’ family of grape varietals.
  • Graciano is utilized in the red and rosé wines ofMâcon, while Aligoté has its own appellation in the shape ofBourgogne Aligoté, which is a blend of Gamay and Aligoté.
  • But it was still authorized within the administrative zone of the Rhône, where it found a new home in the Beaujolais wine region.
  • The production of wine in Burgundy is divided into three separate categories.
  • The second method is through co-operatives, which are organized groups of grape-growers that pool their resources in order to develop a winery for the benefit of the entire group.
  • Because of the high expenditures associated with the construction and maintenance of winemaking facilities, this option is less frequent than the preceding two.
  • The primary reason for this may be traced back to Napoleonic inheritance rules, which grant equal inheritance rights to all children born into a household.
  • The climate of Burgundy is largely continental, with relatively short summers and chilly winters, which makes it difficult for the grapes to develop fully to their full potential.
  • The terrain area is marked by its limestone soils, which present themselves as undulating hills, steep, abrupt valleys, or rocky outcrops depending on the season.

The specific soil make-up of the greatest Burgundy vineyards, in addition to issues of orientation, is what grants them the distinction of Premier Cru or Grand Cru rank (seeBurgundy Wine Label Information).

Get to Know This Gold Standard of Red Wine

Discover more about our review method here. Our editors independently investigate, test, and suggest the finest goods. We may gain a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links. Red Burgundy is widely regarded as the pinnacle of viticulture by collectors, experts, and wine enthusiasts alike, and with good reason. Wine connoisseurs consider these airy, thought-provoking bottles to be among the greatest, if not the best, wines on the globe. You may wonder why this is the case.

  • In a nutshell, terroir is a phrase used to describe all of the variables that distinguish a certain agricultural location.
  • Burgundy is widely considered to be the home of this notion, to the point that even the vineyards within the area are said to have their own distinct terroirs and microclimates.
  • Red Burgundies are pinot noir wines produced in the Burgundy region of France, which is located in the country’s easternmost area.
  • Nevertheless, in Burgundy, many wines are classed into regional categories, village-level designations, Premier Cru designations, and the all-important Grand Cru classifications depending on the vineyard lands from which they are derived.
  • In Burgundy, the region is divided into five major regions: Chablis, the Côte de Beaune, the Côte Chalonnaise, the Côte de Nuits, and the Mâconnais.
  • It is possible to make red Burgundy in a number of styles, and the taste profiles of these wines are highly reliant on the specific appellations or vineyard locations from which the fruit was sourced.
  • Several wineries in the region, for example, like to vinify their wines with full clusters, which means that the stems are employed in the fermentation process, which can impart spicy aromas to the finished product.
  • Dry, strong in acidity, and with low-to-medium tannin levels, the wines are often a pleasure to drink.
  • The robust backbones and faultless structure of red Burgundies, when created by skilled winemakers, make them some of the world’s most age-worthy wines, according to Wine Spectator.
  • Served with everything ranging from roasted fowl to robust stews to French-inspired bistro dishes and beyond, its bright and acidic aromas of red fruits and soil come to life.
  • In the realm of red Burgundy, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti is usually regarded as either the greatest or at the very least the most prominent producer (and as one of the world’s best wines).

However, its bottles retail for hundreds or even thousands of euros each bottle. If you don’t have that type of money to spend, here are five more reasonably priced bottles to sample that are still terrific choices.

Introduction to Burgundy Wine

Karen Frazier contributed to this report. Karen is a wine, drink, and cuisine aficionado who enjoys traveling. She has a California Wine Appellation Specialist credential from the San Francisco wine school, as well as a Bar Smarts mixology certificate, and she works as a bartender for charity events. More information can be found at Specialist in the Appellations of California Wine (CWAS) Burgundy, sometimes known as Bourgogne, is a wine-producing area in France that is known for producing some of the world’s most costly wines.

Burgundy’s Old World wines, which are regarded standards for the rest of the world, are considered classics.

Pinot Noir

Karen Frazier contributed to this article. The author of this article is a wine and cocktail aficionado who also enjoys good meals. She has a California Wine Appellation Specialist credential from the San Francisco wine school, as well as a Bar Smarts mixology certificate, and she volunteers as a bartender for philanthropic events. More information can be found at Specialized in California Wine Appellations (CWAS) It is a wine area in France that produces some of the world’s most costly wines.

Burgundy is also known as Bourgogne, and it is the country’s second-largest wine producer after Bordeaux.

Chardonnay

White Burgundy is prepared only from Chardonnay grapes. In the rest of the globe, Chardonnay from Burgundy is considered to be the benchmark, and it can be found in a variety of styles, from lean, mineral, and snappy when made in Chablis to rich and buttery with notes and smells of tree fruit and melon when produced in Côte de Beaune. If you’ve never had a white Burgundy before, you’re in for a treat; this is Chardonnay like you’ve never had it before, and it’s a pure reflection of the region from which it comes.

Gamay

Gamay is a red wine grape that is a distant relative of the Pinot Noir vine. It is grown in France. It is most recognized for its usage in the production of Beaujolais and Beaujolais Nouveau, delicious red wines that are administratively categorized as belonging to the Burgundy area, despite the fact that Beaujolais is regarded to be a distinct wine region in its own right. Gamay wines with varietal labels may be found in the Mâconnais area of Burgundy, and it can also be found in the Crémant de Bourgogne region.

These wines may include up to 15 percent Pinot Noir in their composition. They are often delicious and young in flavor, with characteristics reminiscent of fresh red fruits.

Aligoté

Aligoté is a white wine grape that is grown in France. Traditional white Burgundy wines do not include this flavoring agent; nonetheless, it is present in varietals from the region. In its youth, this white wine is supposed to be drunk in its simplicity and ease of consumption. Wines from this region are designated as Bourgogne Aligoté AOC or Bourgogne Aligoté Bouzeron, respectively. Aligoté wines can include up to 15 percent Chardonnay by volume, depending on the producer. The wines are light and acidic, and they are frequently combined with crème de cassis to create a popular regional cocktail known as kir, which is made with Aligoté and crème de cassis.

Other Varietals

There are a few more grape varietals that are produced in the Burgundy area as well, including the following:

  • Sauvignon blanc (white)
  • Pinot blanc (white)
  • Pinot beurot (Pinot gris-white)
  • Melon de Bourgogne (Muscadet – white)
  • Sacy (white)
  • César (red)
  • César (red

Crémant de Bourgogne

All sparkling wines produced in France outside of the Champagneregion and using the traditionalmethode champenoise are referred to as Crémant wines. All sparkling wines produced in France outside of the Champagneregion are referred to as Crémant wines. Some Burgundy wineries develop their own sparkling wines, known as Crémant de Bourgogne, which are sold in the region. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are the primary grapes used in the production of these wines, however some may also contain Gamay and Aligoté.

Burgundy’s Quality Classifications

Understand Burgundy wines and how they are classified in order to fully appreciate them. This knowledge is essential for deciphering Burgundy wine labels and understanding the wines of Burgundy. There are four different levels of quality.

Appellations Grands Crus (Grand Cru)

In the area of Burgundy, these are the highest-quality wines available. The grapes for grand crus are grown on the Côte d’Or’s mid-slopes, where they receive the finest and longest exposure to the sun. It is estimated that more than 30 appellations d’origine contrôlée (AOCs) exist in Burgundy, but that they account for less than 2 percent of the overall wine output. These wines will be designated as Grand Cru on the bottle, and they will not include the names of any villages or communes, but will instead just include the name of the vineyard.

Appellations Premiers Crus (Premier Cru)

Premier cru wines, which are the second-highest quality category in Burgundy, account for slightly more than 10% of the region’s total production. In general, premier cru grapes are grown on Burgundy’s legendary slopes, although they are often planted at the top or bottom of the hill, where the sun is more varied, to produce a more complex wine. Wines from single plots known asclimats that have been recognized in an appellation or village are used to make these wines. The name of the commune, the name of the climat, and the distinction “appellation 1er cru contrôlée” may all be seen on the labels.

Appellations Villages (Village or Communal)

In Burgundy, appellations of village or communal origin account for little more than 37% of the total wine production. These wines are named for the village in which the grapes are produced.

There are a total of 44 AOCs that have been classified as community appellations. It is possible to find the commune listed on the label but not the precise climat, thus you may see anything like Mercurey, Nuits-Saint-Georges, or Pommard listed on the label, for example.

Appellations Régionales (Regional)

Regional appellation wines account for little less than 52 percent of all wines produced in Burgundy. Within this category are 23 AOCs, including the all-encompassing Bourgogne rouge (Pinot Noir) and Bourgogne blanc (Chardonnay) labels, as well as the more specific Bourgogne blanc (Chardonnay) classification. Generally speaking, they are the most general of Burgundy’s wines, and they may be a combination of wines from different climats and villages. Things like Coteaux Bourguignon or Mâcon Villages may appear on the label, and this category also contains wines like Bourgogne Aligoté and Crémant de Bourgogne, among other things.

The Bourgogne Wine Region

It is located in the eastern section of Central France, in the region known as Bourgogne (Bourgogne wine). It has a wine-producing area of around 300 km (186 miles), which is divided into five primary subregions and 100 appellations, each with their own distinct character. Aside from that, there are more than 300 communes that cultivate grapes throughout the region. The best vineyard land in Burgundy is found on the slopes of the hillsides. In Burgundy, the following are the major geographical areas.

Chablis

This vineyard is located in the northern section of the département of Bourgogne, in the Yonne region, close to the town of Auxerre. It is located in the far northern area of Bourgogne, distant from the other Burgundy wine districts. It is most renowned for its crisp, white Chardonnays that are fermented in stainless steel tanks with little to no wood. It has one grand cru appellation, Chablis Grand Cru, and one premier cru appellation, Premier Cru Chablis. It also has one grand cru appellation, Chablis Grand Cru.

Côte de Nuits

The Côte de Nuits is a region in northern Bourgogne, near the city of Dijon, that is known for its wine. With the Côte de Beaune, it is part of the wider mountainous area known as Côte d’Or, which includes many other wine regions. The greatest wines in this region are made from grapes cultivated on the sunny slopes of the region’s hillsides. The Côte de Nuits is divided into 14 communes, each of which has a number of grand cru AOCs:

  • In northern Bourgogne, near the town of Dijon, is the region known as Côte de Nuits. It is part of the broader hilly region known as Côte d’Or, which includes the Côte de Beaune. From grapes cultivated on the sunny slopes of the region’s hillsides, the greatest wines are made in this region. On the Côte de Nuits, there are 14 communes, each of which has a significant number of grand cru AOCs.

Côte de Beaune

The Côte de Beaune, named after the town of Beaune, is most recognized for its outstanding white wines made from Chardonnay, while it also produces some excellent reds. It is located just south of Côte de Nuits and constitutes the southern half of the Côte d’Or wine growing region. There are various AOCs that are considered grand crus, including:

  • Corton (reds and whites)
  • Corton-Charlemagne (white)
  • Bâtard-Montrachet (white)
  • Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet (white)
  • Chevalier-Montrachet (white)
  • Montrachet (white)
  • Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet (white)
  • Corton

Côte Chalonnaise

The Côte Chalonnaise, which is located immediately south of the Côte de Beaune, produces both red and white wines, with the majority of the grapes coming from Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and Gamay. The terrain is steep, and the region receives only a moderate amount of rainfall. Despite the fact that there are no grand cru vineyards in this region, there are some premier cru vineyards. The following are the subregions of the Côte Chalonnaise:

Mâconnais

Mâconnais is Burgundy’s southernmost area, located south of the Côte Chalonnaise and close to the Beaujolais region.

Grapes are planted on gently undulating hillsides, and Chardonnay is the major grape grown for wine production, however you’ll also find plantings of Pinot Noir and Gamay in the area. Pouilly-Fuissé is a Chardonnay-producing area in Mâconnais that is one of the most well-known in the world.

Burgundy’s Best Vintages

According to Wine Spectator, some of the top white Burgundy vintages in recent years include the following:

Côtes de Beaune Reds

The following are some of the best recent vintages for Côtes de Beaune reds:

Try Wines From Burgundy

While exceptional Burgundy wines might be prohibitively pricey, there are still affordable options for those on a tight budget. Burgundy wines, maybe more than any other type of wine in the world, express a feeling of location and time. When you sip a wine from Burgundy, you can have a better understanding of how terroir influences the taste of wine. LoveToKnow Media was founded in the year 2022. All intellectual property rights are retained.

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