What Is A Meritage Wine? (Solution found)

Meritage is a name for red and white Bordeaux-style wines without infringing on the Bordeaux (France) region’s legally protected designation of origin. Winemakers must license the Meritage trademark from its owner, the California-based Meritage Alliance.

Can there be white Meritage wines?

  • Keep in mind that a Meritage can be a white wine if the blend is based on Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon and Muscadelle, but most of the time I see red Meritages, which can include grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot.

What kind of wine is a Meritage?

A Red Meritage is a blend of two or more of the red “noble” Bordeaux varieties – Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Merlot, Petit Verdot and the rarer St. Macaire, Gros Verdot and Carmenère.

What makes up a Meritage wine?

A red Meritage wine must contain at least two Bordeaux grapes from the following varietals: cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot, malbec and petit verdot. These wines are routinely named among the world’s most highly rated bottles, as they boast a silky smooth, complex, yet robust structure.

Is Meritage wine dry or sweet?

White Meritage is relatively simpler in that it is essentially a blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon. A little of the aromatic Muscadelle grape may be added, but the variety is too sweet for most modern American palates and is used more as a condiment to the wine than a staple ingredient.

Is Meritage a red or white wine?

Meritage is a name for red and white Bordeaux-style wines. Red Meritage is the most common blend and includes many different combinations of red wine grapes. Most popular Meritage varietals are Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot. Rich and full of flavours and aromas such as dark fruits, vanilla and spice.

Is Merlot a blend?

Merlot is a dark blue–colored wine grape variety, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. Merlot is also one of the most popular red wine varietals in many markets. This flexibility has helped to make it one of the world’s most planted grape varieties.

What is the difference between Meritage and Bordeaux?

Meritage is a name for red and white Bordeaux-style wines without infringing on the Bordeaux (France) region’s legally protected designation of origin. Winemakers must license the Meritage trademark from its owner, the California-based Meritage Alliance.

What is white Meritage wine?

A white Meritage must be a blend of two or more “noble” white grapes. These include Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle du Bordelais. White Meritage wines typically pair beautifully with seafood and poultry and can be stored away to develop complexity, unlike many other wine whites.

Is Opus One a Meritage?

A United States trademarked designation, adopted in 1988 by the Meritage Association, for California wines that are a blend of the varieties of grapes used in Bordeaux. Such wines as Opus One, Insignia, Cain Five, and Magnificat would all qualify as Meritage if their producers chose to have them so designated.

Where did the term Meritage come from?

What you have is Meritage, a relatively recent addition to the wine lexicon, coined to describe wines from California and elsewhere modeled on French Bordeaux. The Meritage concept was supposed to take the world by storm when it was introduced to the public by a group of American vintners in 1988.

Who makes Meritage wine?

Blended with Care The expression of our terroir through estate-grown Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Petit Verdot blended with locally sourced Malbec makes our Meritage unique to King Family Vineyards. This limited production wine is sought after for its complexity, Old World flavor, and aging potential.

What is in Chianti wine?

Chianti wine (“kee-on-tee”) is a red blend from Tuscany, Italy, made primarily with Sangiovese grapes. Common tasting notes include red fruits, dried herbs, balsamic vinegar, smoke, and game.

What does GSM wine taste like?

Most high quality GSM blends pop with flavors of bright red cherry, strawberry, and raspberry, followed immediately by black plum, blackberry, and black pepper and generally finish with baking spices and savory bbq or cured meat.

What wine is Montepulciano?

Montepulciano is a red grape variety planted widely throughout central Italy. It is most prominent in Abruzzo, where it produces Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. The grape is also known as Cordisco, Morellone and Uva Abruzzese. The best Montepulciano wines are deep-colored and have ripe and powerful tannins.

What color is the pinot grape?

Pinot Noir is a red grape, offering the ability to make red and rosé wine. In contrast, Pinot Grigio/Gris makes primarily white wine with zero skin contact during the winemaking process. However, skin-contact wines are not uncommon, which produce a light pink or sometimes copper-hued wine.

What is a lux wine?

Founded in 2014, LUX Wines is an importer and purveyor of fine wines from around the world created by E. & J. Gallo Winery as a distinct selling and marketing division.

What is Meritage? – Meritage Alliance

  • Itinerary: What is Meritage, Grapes, Winemaking, Our Story, Member Wineries

Defining Meritage; Grapes and Winemaking; Our Story; Member Wineries;

Meritage Wine Information

The Meritage Alliance” itemprop=”url” content=”Alliance logo Meritage Alliance” Meritage Alliance Meritage is a word that refers to red and white wines created in the manner of Bordeaux that are produced by members of the Meritage Alliance. Neither the red nor white wine categories are authorized to include more than two different grape types, and no one grape variety may account for more than 90 percent of the final mix. In comparison to the white Meritage, red Meritage is far more common, and it is typically made up of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot grapes.

  • Many Californian winemakers were dissatisfied with the varietal-wine-labeling rules in the United States at the time, and they desired to develop a distinctive brand to market their own proprietary blends.
  • The Meritage Alliance, a non-profit organization that recovers costs by collecting a nominal charge based on the volume of wine produced by each member, regulates the use of the name Meritage.
  • Membership in the Meritage Alliance is dominated by wineries in the United States, although there are also wineries in Argentina, Australia, Canada, France, Israel, and Mexico that are members.
  • However, while the mix is based on Bordeaux red wines over the last 200 years, the wines produced have a considerable New World influence.
  • These phrases can also be found on New World wines, however there is a stronger focus on varietal composition in the latter region.
  • White Meritage is a lot easier than red Meritage because it is just a combination of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon grapes.
  • Because of the strength of Sauvignon Blanc’s varietal character, the requirement to designate the wine as Meritage has been significantly reduced in recent years.

Due of Meritage’s strong association with red wine, it may even be harmful to conflate the red and white wines produced in this style under one umbrella brand name. The following foods pair well with Meritage wines:

  • Meatballs in tomato sauce
  • Beefyakitori
  • Lentils with bacon
  • Osso bucco (braised veal shanks)

What is a Meritage Wine? – The California Wine Club

Members of the California Wine Club recently received a package including the 2013 Paso RoblesMeritagefromFour Brix Winery, which was a pleasant surprise. What is the origin of the name of this excellent and increasingly popular form of blended wine, and how did it come to be? In the 1980s, a group of American vintners, now known as The Meritage Alliance, set out to promote New World wines that were made in the same manner as the renowned Bordeaux blends, and they succeeded. Meritage, which is pronounced like heritage, is a term they used to characterize high-quality wines made from “noble” grapes farmed in the New World and blended using traditional blending procedures and methodologies.

  1. Wineries must demonstrate that their wine fits the standards for inclusion in the Meritage program and gain authorization from the alliance in order to use this designation on their labels.
  2. The “noble” grape is grown in this vineyard.
  3. Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbecor, and Petit Verdot are among the varieties available.
  4. A red Meritage wine is typically praised for its nuanced aromas and silky smooth texture, and it is a popular choice for food pairings.
  5. A white Meritage must be a combination of two or more “noble” white grapes in order to be considered such.
  6. White Meritage wines, in contrast to many other white wines, often pair well with seafood and poultry and may be aged for a longer period of time to develop depth.
  7. Do you require a bottle?
  8. Brief SynopsisArticle Title What is a Meritage, and how does it work?
  9. Author The California Wine Club is a group of wine enthusiasts from California.

Meritage – Wikipedia

Wines from the Lyeth Sonoma County vineyard in 2005, Estancia Alexander Valley in 2001, and Jackson-Triggs Okanagan Valley vineyard in 2002 are all Meritage wines. Meritage is a term used to describe red and white Bordeaux-style wines that do not infringe on the legally protected indication of origin for the Bordeaux (France) area.

Winemakers must get a license from the Meritage Alliance, which is situated in California and owns the Meritage brand. The majority of member wineries are located in the United States, while there are several in other countries as well.

History

The Meritage Association was founded in 1988 by a small group of vintners from Sonoma County and Napa Valley, California, who were becoming increasingly frustrated with regulations from the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) requiring wines to contain at least 75% of a specific grape variety in order to be labeled as a varietal. As interest rose in making Bordeaux-style wines, which, due to their blended character, do not qualify for varietal designation, members wanted to give their blended wines a label that would be easily recognized by consumers.

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The name “Meritage,” a combination of the words “merit” and “heritage,” was chosen, and the coiner received two bottles of each of the first 10 vintages of each wine licensed to use the brand.

The company saw rapid development after shifting its focus away from trademark policing and toward education and marketing.

The Meritage Association announced in May 2009 that it will be renamed the Meritage Alliance in order to better reflect its mission.

Trademark licensing and wine production

There are specific blends that can be called “Meritage,” a price each case (currently $1.00, with a ceiling of $500.00 per vintage), and additional labeling restrictions outlined in the Meritage agreement. It is necessary to make a red Meritage from a blend of at least two of the following grape varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon (the primary variety), Merlot (the secondary variety), Cabernet Franc (the third variety), Malbec (the third variety), Petit Verdot (the second varietal), St. Macaire (the third variety), Gros Verdot (the third variety), or Carmenère (the fourth variety).

Despite the fact that it is not required by the license agreement, the Meritage Alliance strongly advises that wineries label only their best blends as Meritage and limit production to no more than 25,000 cases per year.

Pronunciation

There are specific blends that can be called “Meritage,” a price each case (currently $1.00, with a maximum of $500.00 per vintage), and additional labeling limitations outlined in the Meritage agreement. It is necessary to make a red Meritage from a blend of at least two of the following grape varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon (the primary variety), Merlot (the secondary variety), Cabernet Franc (the third variety), Malbec (the third variety), Petit Verdot (the second varietal), St. Macaire (the third variety), Gros Verdot (the fourth variety), or Carmenère (the fifth variety).

Despite the fact that it is not required by the license agreement, the Meritage Alliance strongly advises that wineries label only their best blends as Meritage and limit output to no more than 25,000 cases of wine.

Winemaking and winegrowing are not governed by obligatory restrictions, as is the case with AOC laws in the United States.

References

Greetings, everyone! My name is Dr. Vinifera, but you can call me Vinny if you like. Ask me your most difficult wine questions, ranging from the nuances of etiquette to the complexities of winemaking science. Not to worry, I’m no wine connoisseur; you can also come to me with those “stupid questions” that you’re too embarrassed to ask your wine geek buddies. Hope you find my responses to be instructive, empowering, and perhaps humorous in some way. Please remember to visit my frequently asked questions page as well as my whole archive for all of my Q A masterpieces.

  1. Vinny.
  2. The distinction between a Meritage and a red blend might be confusing.
  3. When it comes to a superb red mix, there’s nothing quite like it.
  4. Meritage (which rhymes with “legacy”) is a type of blended wine that falls under a certain category.

Keep in mind that a Meritage can be a white wine if the blend is based on Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, and Muscadelle, but the majority of the time I see red Meritages, which can include grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot, among other varieties.

Meritage Wine Ratings & Reviews

Concerning the Meritage Meritage wines, which are derived from a combination of the terms “Merit” and “Heritage,” are produced in the United States and must contain some mix of the traditional Bordeaux varietals. Upon closer inspection of our Meritage Wine Ratings, it becomes clear that red blends predominate over white blends by a wide margin. The noble grapes Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec are used to make the red wines, while Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, and Muscadelle are used to make the white wines.

When applying for and obtaining a license via the Meritage Alliance, wineries must state that they are making a “meritage blend.” However, some wineries opt to name their wines, establishing a proprietary blend such as Joseph Phelps’ “Insignia.” As a result, the Alliance believes that these wines represent the finest of the vintage.

If you want to learn more about these wines, you can read our Meritage Wine Reviews.

What is Meritage?

Concerning the Meritage of the People It is derived from the terms “Meritage” and “Heritage” and refers to wines that are produced in the United States and that contain a blend of traditional Bordeaux varietals. Upon closer inspection of our Meritage Wine Ratings, it becomes clear that red blends predominate over white blends by a significant margin. While the nobleCabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec are used to make the red wines, the white wines are made up ofSauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, and Muscadelle, which are combined to make the white wines.

When applying for and obtaining a license via the Meritage Alliance, wineries must state that they are making a “meritage blend.” However, some wineries opt to name their wines, establishing a proprietary blend such as Joseph Phelps'” Insignia.” As a result, the Alliance believes that these wines represent the finest of the vintage.

Consumers can expect rich and powerful flavors that are bursting with luscious and luxuriant berry fruit that will only get better with time in oak barrels. If you want to learn more about these wines, check out our Meritage Wine Reviews section.

What is a Meritage Wine? Explained – Glossary of Wine Terms

In a nutshell, Meritage is a wine word that refers to Bordeaux-style red and white wines produced by members of the Meritage Alliance that are manufactured in small quantities. According to the Meritage Association, the term is “used to distinguish handcrafted wines blended from the classic ‘noble’ Bordeaux varieties.”

Learn Everything You Need to Know about Meritage in Video

The word Meritage is a combination of the words “merit” (as in worth) and “heritage,” and it means “additional inheritance.” The term was chosen as the brand name because it conveys a feeling of both quality and heritage in one word. So, how did this expression come to be? This nonprofit organization was established in 1988 with the goal of promoting blended wines of outstanding quality from California and Napa Valley, which was primarily the focus of the group’s activities at the time. This was due to the fact that many Californian winemakers were dissatisfied with the varietal wine-labeling regulations in the United States, which compel a winery to eliminate the name of a varietal grape variety such as cabernet sauvignon or Merlot if the wine contains less than 75% of that varietal.

  • As a result, the word “Meritage” was coined in order to distinguish between the good ones.
  • Please share your thoughts in the comments.
  • Also recommended is that you produce less than 25,000 cases of your wine every year, which is around 300,000 bottles.
  • So there’s a really broad range of possibilities there.
  • It is simply the typical grapes from the Bordeaux mix that are being used.
  • In addition, there are three white grape varieties: Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, and Muscadelle.
  • However, you can also find Meritage from other states, as well as nations such as Canada, Argentina, Australia, Israel, and even Mexico, in addition to Texas.

Listen and hear the correctly pronunciation of Meritage in the video below

Rodney Strong SymmetryMeritage, Alexander ValleySterling Vineyards Vintner’s Collection Meritage, Central CoastEstancia Estates Reserve Meritage, Paso RoblesTrump Winery Meritage, Monticello, VirginiaRodney Strong SymmetryMeritage, Alexander ValleySterling Vineyards Vintner’s Collection Meritage, Central CoastRodney Strong SymmetryMeritage, Alexander ValleyChateau Ste. York Creek Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon – Meritage (Spring Mountain District)Lyeth Estate Meritage (Sonoma County)Cosentino Winery The Poet Meritage (Napa Valley)DeLille Cellars Chaleur Estate (Yakima Valley, Washington)Robert Mondavi WineryPrivate Selection Meritage (California)York Creek Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon – Meritage (Spring Mountain District) Napa Valley’s St.

Coz’ Meritage, Napa Valley’s King Family Vineyards Meritage, Monticello’s Summerhill Pyramid Winery OM Organic Meritage, Okanagan Valley, Canada’s Kirkland Signature Meritage, Napa Valley’s Nk’Mip Cellars Mer’r’iym Meritage

Learn more about Meritage wines onmeritagealliance.com

Meritage is pronounced MEH-rih-tij, and it is spoken in the same way as Heritage. This is a made-up word that has been registered as a trademark in the United States, and wineries must pay to be able to use it on their labels. Because it is not a French term, and because it is not pronounced “meh-rih-TAAAGGHHHE,” as one might assume if it were a French word, it is not pronounced “meh-rih-TAAAGGHHHE.” Back in 1989, wineries all across the United States were coming up with names for their different blended wines, and it was becoming more difficult to keep track of them all.

They asked more than 6,000 individuals to submit suggestions for the name of this mix, and the winner was “Meritage.” Merit and Heritage are two terms that have been purposefully combined to form this phrase.

It shouldn’t be spoken as if it were a foreign language like French.

What is in Meritage?

For starters, a wine cannot be labeled as “meritage” if it is not produced in large quantities for mass consumption. The winery’s Meritage production must be less than 25,000 cases per year. A “high-end” wine for the winery is required; it cannot be a “bargain basement” offering from the vineyard. Most significantly, the meritage must be made up of a combination of certain grape varieties. Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, Merlot, Petit Verdot, St. Macaire, Gros Verdot, and Carmenère are among the grape varieties grown in California.

This dish is made using Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, and Muscadelle grapes.

How does Meritage Taste?

Because it is created from the same grapes as Bordeaux, a meritage has a flavor that is identical to that of Bordeaux! Aromatically, it has a deep, rich flavor. It can contain blackberry, black cherry, spices, chocolate, and vanilla, depending on the specific mix. Blackberry, black cherry, spices, chocolate, and vanilla The majority of Meritages contain the distinctive notes of Bordeaux – cigar box, ripe fruits, and a weighty texture. It goes perfectly with a steak, as well as with game meats such as deer, pheasant, and so on!

For the finest flavor, Meritage should be served at 64 degrees Fahrenheit.

WineIntro takes you on a journey through the delectable diversity and lovely history that is our world of wine!

Each of us has a unique set of taste buds, which adds to the magic of our world.

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What Is A Meritage Wine?

In the first place, resist the desire to pronounce it “Mary-Taj.” It’s pronounced similarly to the word “legacy.” It certainly goes against the grain of the forced adult pronunciation boot camp we’ve all been subjected to over the past year (Bach, Neufchatel, fiscal insolvency). However, the reason it is pronounced in this manner has a great deal to do with its meaning. As you can see, meritage is essentially a made-up term. For one thing, it was invented for a good cause, unlike terms like “bromance” or “amazeballs.” Knowing your wine history, you’ll be aware that in the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” wine competition, some upstart Napa Valley winemakers defeated the French at their own game, resulting in the victory of the Napa Valley wines.

  1. And by the late 1980s, several of those American winemakers had become tired of being referred to by generic names for their products.
  2. Yes, wines called after a grape variety do not have to be created entirely from that variety; generally, 75 percent of the grape variety is required.
  3. It was really possible to find American winemakers who were doing almost exactly what they were doing in Bordeaux: creating amazing wines from a small variety of grapes known as ” noble ” grapes.
  4. Don’t let a drop pass you by!
  5. You can see why an American winemaker in the 1980s was frustrated, especially when you compare it to the French manner, where a bottle bearing the Bordeaux appellation on its label can bring big crowds—and high costs.
  6. The episode of Seinfeld, no, not that one.
  7. A little street cred was in need for some of the winemakers who blended their wines precisely in the style of Bordeaux, and they desired a phrase that could be applied to any bottle created in this manner, as well as a name that would gain interest and commercial worth over time.
  8. Naturally, because this is America, they turned to the people for answers.
  9. What is the significance of “meritage”?
  10. If you open a bottle labeled “meritage,” what do you expect to find inside?
  11. Meritage wines are available in both red and white varieties, and they are generally made from the finest grapes from a particular year.

Whatever you purchase, the objective is that you should be able to put your faith in the fact that what’s within is of high quality. If you come up with a new word, you have a certain amount of responsibility to stand behind it. Originally published on May 10, 2016.

Meritage Wine: A New World Take on Bordeaux Wine

Meritage is a relatively recent term in the wine world. Many Californian wines are available at your local wine shop, so you may have come across it when strolling around the aisles. But, exactly, what can you anticipate from a Meritage wine is a mystery. The answer is a New World type of Bordeaux, which is one of the world’s oldest and most renowned styles of wine, and it is made in France. Meritage is a mix that you don’t want to miss out on because of its widespread appeal and relative price.

History of Meritage Wine

The 1980s saw several California winemakers struggle to promote their product to customers, despite the fact that New World wines in general, and Californian wines in particular, had gained in reputation since the 1976 Judgment of Paris wine tasting. In the United States, any wine made from at least 75% of a single grape variety can be branded with the varietal name. Take, for instance, Cabernet Sauvignon. But what about wines made from a combination of multiple grapes, such as those from the region of Bordeaux?

  1. A group of California winemakers got together in 1988 and decided that what they needed was a whole new name to represent a high-quality kind of blended wine created in the New World, which they came up with themselves.
  2. Place names in the United States, on the other hand, are not as protected or controlled as they are in France, nor is there the centuries-worth of trial and error and rules associated to AVAs that are attached to French Appellations.
  3. Instead, they would have to come up with a new name from start and then trademark the phrase to prevent it from being copied or misappropriated.
  4. It’s a blend of merit, which indicates superior quality, and legacy, which is a tribute to France’s classic Bordeaux wines.

What’s In A Meritage Blend?

Meritage wine is created from at least two different varieties of the “noble” Bordeaux grapes, with one grape variety accounting for no more than ninety percent of the whole mix in most cases. That’s all there is to it! Once a winemaker has established their blend, he or she must submit an application to the Meritage Association in order to use the name Meritage on the label, as the phrase is protected by trademark.

However, they are the only two prerequisites for the application. The following grapes can be used to make a red Meritage wine:

  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Cabernet Franc
  • Malbec
  • Merlot
  • Petit Verdot
  • St. Macaire
  • Gros Verdot
  • Carmenère
  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Cabernet

If the wine contains any other grape variety in addition to Merlot, it cannot be labeled as Meritage. When it comes to white blends, white Meritage and white Bordeaux are both more difficult to come by, but if you do, you’ll find a highly food-friendly wine that’s often praised as elegant and balanced. The grapes that may be used to make white Meritage include the following:

  • Sauvignon Blanc is a kind of white wine produced in France. Semillon
  • In addition, Muscadelle du Bordelais is served.

When compared to the red Meritage, this is a fairly small list! Again, if the producer wishes to label the wine a Meritage, no other grape varietals can be combined into it.

Meritage Wines to Try

You can get wonderful Meritage wines at every price range, from the low-cost $10-15 bottle to the high-end $100-plus bottle and everything in between. Listed below are a few brands to keep an eye out for during your next shopping excursion:

Bargain Brands

All of these wines are in the $10-20 range and have received excellent reviews from wine writers.

  • Trader Joe’s Grand Reserve is a premium brand of coffee from Trader Joe’s. Meritage from Napa Valley, $12.99 a bottle Believe it or not, one of the greatest Meritage mixes can be found right in your local Trader Joe’s store. There are flavors of vanilla and caramel in this wine, which is described as fruit-forward with a long, dry finish. Decant it for an hour or two before serving to ensure that you get the most flavor out of it. Cameron Hughes is a British actor who is best known for his role in the film Meritage from Napa Valley, $10-19 per bottle In Meritage, the Cameron Hughes winery is routinely regarded as one of the greatest values to be found. It has flavors of blackberry, chocolate, wood, plum, and cedar, and it is a rich and smooth wine. It is possible to experience it instantly
  • Signature by Kirkland Rutherford Meritage from Napa Valley, $13.99 a bottle Another big-box brand, this one accessible only at Costco, is a good example. Cabernet Sauvignon is the signature grape of the Rutherford AVA, and it’s practically hard to acquire a nice bottle of wine from this region for less than $20. Unfortunately, as the region’s Cabernet Sauvignon becomes more well-known, the price of the grapes rises, and Kirkland Signature has been gradually reducing the amount of Cabernet Sauvignon used in its Meritage blends over the past several years. As a result, more current vintages aren’t as complicated as their predecessors were. It’s still an excellent value, though, thanks to the abundance of jammy fruit and the distinctive “Rutherford dust” finish.

Midpriced Meritage

They are outstanding Meritage blends that range in price from $20 to $50. They have the same characteristics as a fine Bordeaux but are half the price.

  • Bottles of Geyser Peak Alexander Valley Meritage Red are available for purchase for $45 each. This Cabernet-heavy Meritage mix, which was named one of Wine Enthusiast’s best wines of the year in 2003, is delicate, velvety, and rich. It has a strong note of cherry and is gently oaked to give it just a hint of spice, and it is made by Geyser Peak. Everything about it was delightful
  • Three Rivers is a town in the United States that is located on the banks of three rivers. Columbia Valley Meritage is available for $39 per bottle. Three Rivers Winery is well-known for their Meritage blends, both white and red, which frequently receive favorable reviews from critics. The white blend is a wonderful bargain at roughly $19 a bottle, and it has a lot of fresh herb and citrus flavors, as well as being aged in French oak and having a decent acidity balance. Typically more costly than the white mix, the red blend has strong savory, smokey aromas that are complemented by notes of violet and licorice. Smooth and understated

Pricey

Please keep in mind that, similar to their French counterparts, these more costly wines often require a minimum of five years of maturing, if not 10, fifteen or even more years.

  • Vérité La Joie Meritage is available for $100. According to Robert Parker, the 2001 vintage of this outstanding Sonoma Valley Meritage scored 96 points. He characterized it as rich and intense, with “Aromas and flavors of roasted espresso, grilled herbs, scorched earth, blackberries, and cassis.” Vérité’s other Meritage blends, like as La Muse, tend to garner extremely good reviews as well–despite the fact that they are also rather pricey. There are fourteen different appellations. Meritage from Napa Valley, $85 After around five years of maturing, this wine tends to take on smooth, velvety qualities, with rich fruit-forward aromas of cherry, currant, and chocolate. It is described as mellow and earthy. The Meritage mix has received the greatest user ratings on Vivino, and it is by far the most popular.

What is “Meritage?”

Virginia wineries frequently include a “Meritage” wine on their list of available varietals. What is the meaning of this phrase, and where did it come from? What is a Meritage Wine, and how does it differ from other wines? A mix of Bordeaux varietals—Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec—is referred to as Meritage (which rhymes with heritage) in its simplest form (and sometime Carmenere). Furthermore, no one grape can account for more than 90 percent of the whole mix.

  1. What was the inspiration for the creation of this term?
  2. In the United States, a wine can be labeled with a varietal name if it contains at least 75% of the grape variety in question.
  3. However, in many circumstances, winemakers are purposefully mixing wines in order to develop a certain style in which the total is greater than the sum of the individual components.
  4. One such example of a superior Meritage wine is theKing Family Monticello Meritage, which is a blend of Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, and Malbec with a complex nose of bright red fruit, violets, and dried rose petals, laced with delicate notes of saffron, vanilla, and spice.
  5. It is necessary for wineries to apply for and pay to become members of the Meritage Alliance in order to be authorized to name their wine as Meritage.
  6. In the case of the Veritas Vineyards Vintner’s Reserve, a combination of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, and Malbec from the winemaker’s favorite barrels in the cellar, for example.
  7. Ingleside Vineyards is another another Virginia vineyard that has taken a novel approach to this particular section of the state.
  8. The wines are referred to as “Left Bank” and “Right Bank,” respectively, in reference to the distinct areas within the Bordeaux region.

The Left Bank blend has a higher proportion of Cabernet Sauvignon, whilst the Right Bank contains a higher proportion of Merlot. Both are equally deserving of a visit to their respective tasting rooms!

Burning Question: What’s a Meritage Blend?

A “Meritage” wine is one that is frequently offered by Virginia wineries on their wine lists. What is the meaning of this phrase, and where did it come from originally? What is a Meritage Wine, and how does it differ from other types of wines? A mix of Bordeaux varietals—Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec—is referred to as Meritage (which rhymes with heritage) in its most basic definition (and sometime Carmenere). Furthermore, no one grape may account for more than 90 percent of the whole mix.

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Is there any significance to this term?

The varietal name of a grape can be used on a bottle of wine in the United States if it includes at least 75% of the grape in question.

Nevertheless, in many circumstances, winemakers combine wines to produce a certain style that is larger than the sum of its parts, which is known as blending.

Among the best examples of a superior Meritage wine is theKing Family Monticello Meritage — a blend of Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc, and Malbec that has a complex nose of bright red fruit, violets, and dried rose petals, laced with delicate notes of saffron, vanilla, and spice — which has a complex nose of bright red fruit, violets, and dried rose petals that is laced with delicate notes of The situation is complicated by the fact that some wineries aren’t affiliated with the Meritage Alliance.

To be eligible to name their wine as Meritage, wineries must apply for and pay for membership in the Meritage Alliance.

In the case of the Veritas Vineyards Vintner’s Reserve, a combination of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot, and Malbec is sourced from the winemaker’s favorite barrels in the cellar.

Included in this group of wineries is Ingleside Vineyards, which has adopted a novel approach to this section of the state.

Because the wines come from distinct locations within Bordeaux, they have been dubbed “Left Bank” and “Right Bank.” It is more Cabernet-heavy in both the Left and Right Bank blends, while Merlot-heavy in the Right Bank mix. A visit to their tasting rooms is highly recommended for both!

What Is a Meritage Wine

What Is a Meritage Wine?” on=”” a=”” wine=”” list,=”” there=”” was=”” section=”” for=”” meritage=”” wines.=”” they=”” had=”” nice=”” names=”” but=”” seemed=”” pricey.=”” what=”” is=”” wine?”<="" i="">– C.S., Reno, NVThe term Meritage, which rhymes with heritage, is a designation for wines with a blend of two or more grape varietals. The U.S. government law states that in order for a wine to call itself by only one varietal such as Chardonnay or Cabernet Sauvignon, there must be at least 75 percent of the named grape varietal used in the wine. That means that 25 percent can be other grapes that the winemaker needs or wants to use to achieve the product taste profile that he or she desires.When a winemaker uses less than 75 percent of one grape, it is called a Meritage wine.These wines are generally the winemakers’ artistic expression of the very best blend he or she can make. It allows for creativity, diversity and some very delicious wines. Yes, some can be pricey, but it is usually because there is a limited amount of the blend which makes them extra special. Most all of the red wines produced in the Bordeaux region of France are blends of five red grapes; Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. They do not call these Meritage, instead they are called Bordeaux red wine.The Cain 5 is a popular Meritage from Napa Valley which uses all five of the Bordeaux grape varieties. Some other well-known and loved Meritage wines are Dominus, Insignia, Opus One and The Poet. Many of these wineries make white wine blends as well. One of the most popular white blends is made at Caymus and is called Conundrum. It is a blend of five white grape varietals and it is delicious. Most of the wineries make a Meritage wine, so be sure to ask your wine retailer which ones they have in stock.Have fun!

Meritage

(MER-i-tidge) Meritage is the word given to blends made in the United States that incorporate the classic grapes used in left Bank Bordeaux wines that are dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon. Synonyms: Blends that are primarily composed of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot in varied amounts are referred to as “cabernet blends.” Bordeaux is the name given to a wine that comes from the Bordeaux area of France. If the wine is from the New World, the designations are Meritage or a Bordeaux-like combination.

  • Background: Unless they are produced in the Bordeaux area of France, wines produced elsewhere are not permitted to bear the name Bordeaux.
  • Macaire, Gros Verdot, and Carmenere.
  • In the Medoc, Haut Medoc, and Grave regions of Bordeaux, this mix is intended to be a representation of the blend that was employed on the left bank of the Garonne River.
  • Black currants dominate the flavor profile, with tobacco, cedar, and leather overtones derived from the French oak barrels used in the maturation process.
  • 2 –commonly used right bank Bordeaux Body — a medium-sized body Acidity is a medium level (-) Sweetness – astringency Tannins are of a medium (+) strength.
  • Tannins are of a medium (+) strength.
  • Foods and entrees that are typically served together include: grilled, roasted, or braised beef, lamb, game, chicken, turkey, veal, or pork, chili, hamburgers, meatloaf, mushrooms, cheese-based pasta, and risotto.
  • Cheddar, Corvo, Edam, Glouchester, Muenster, Provolone (aged), Parmesan, Pecorino, Roncal, and Smoked Gouda are some of the cheeses that are available.

Meritage bottlings merit attention

Perhaps no other wine-growing location in the world is as well-equipped as Washington state for producing high-quality Meritage-style red blends. A red-heavy region with a special fondness for Bordeaux types, we are also one of the few places in the world capable of growing all of the permitted grape kinds. The Meritage Association was founded in 1988 by a group of winemakers from the United States, and its standards for bottling a Meritage require any mix of the “noble” Bordeaux types. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Malbec, Carménère, as well as the lesser-known Gros Verdot and St.

Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, and Muscadelle du Bordelais are the only grapes that can be used in a white Meritage.

Each one provides a winemaker with significant freedom when it comes to putting together a high-quality final blend.

The Columbia Valley’s Cabernet-heavy vineyards, as well as the quantity of Merlot, form the foundation of Washington’s red wines.

Drought-resistant Cabernet Franc is used to create a subtle spice profile that adds depth without adding weight.

Until 1994, Carménère was considered a lost grape variety, a victim of the phylloxera epidemic that devastated vineyards throughout most of Europe 150 years ago.

This fortuitous accident of history resulted in it being brought and replanted in Washington, where it now thrives.

This makes it more enjoyable to drink, and it also makes a terrific mixer for smoothing out Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot flavors.

And Washington Malbec is capable of competing on the international scene.

The Harrison Hill red blend from DeLille Cellars in Woodinville, Washington, is one of the best I’ve ever tasted, in my opinion.

Almost all of the grapes are sourced from the same hillside vineyard with a view of Interstate 82.

Repeated tastings have revealed that it is extremely cellar-worthy, with complexity increasing with age.

They are among of my most valued possessions.

They are intended to be the very best wines produced by a certain winery.

This is true for the most part, especially in programs that place a high priority on the care and feeding of vineyards.

Harrison Hill isn’t the only Meritage-style wine produced by DeLille, but it is, in my opinion, the most unique and should be considered among the most valuable wines produced in the Northwest.

The vineyard, which is owned by the Newhouse family and is among the best and most historically significant in the state, contributing to the appeal of the wine.

The fact is that in Washington, this isn39;t much of a problem.

In contrast, American wine consumption patterns suggest that maturing a red wine typically consists of little more than driving home from the shop or winery, opening the cork, and drinking it with dinner.

Alternatively, if you truly enjoy a specific wine, purchase a case to consume over the course of at least three years, and preferably more, to see how it develops in your cellar.

One disadvantage of the Meritage technique is the obligation to employ exclusively Bordeaux varietals in the production of the wine.

As an example, the Chianti region’s Super Tuscan type of wine is made by mixing the Italian grapes Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon to create an unusual kind of wine known as Super Tuscan.

The late Harry McWatters, a winemaker from the Okanagan Valley who was labeled “the Robert Mondavi of British Columbia” by Canadian wine writers, was a staunch supporter of The Meritage Association from the beginning and throughout his life.

Unfortunately, fewer winemakers are utilizing the term “Meritage” to describe these types of wines.

Brian Petersen, owner of Mosquito Fleet Winery in Belfair, Washington, is one of them.

Consider Meritage-style blends as a natural extension of our region’s wine ecosystem as you venture out and about this summer — while donning a mask, of course. I hope you are able to find something to celebrate.

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