How Long To Chill Wine In Freezer?

While it takes 40 minutes to chill a room temperature bottle of wine in the freezer, it takes a fraction of that time using other readily available methods: 11-13 minutes when cooled horizontally in ice water, 6-8 minutes in salted ice water, it will only take 2-3 minutes by spinning it in heavily salted ice water.

How long does it take a bottle of wine to chill in the freezer?

  • A bottle of wine takes close to two hours to chill in the refrigerator. Sticking it in the freezer will speed things up, but this is rough treatment for delicate wines. To chill a bottle fast—15 minutes tops—place it up to its neck in a bucket of water and ice (plain ice alone doesn’t work as well).

Contents

Can you put wine in the freezer to chill it?

Matt Walls, Decanter’s Rhône correspondent, recommends putting your wine in the freezer for 22 minutes for lightly chilled, and 28 minutes for fully chilled. Xavier Rousset MS, sommelier and restaurateur, shared his top tip for speeding it up further.

What is the fastest way to chill wine in the freezer?

Wrap the wine bottle in a damp towel, then place it in the freezer. Wrap a damp towel around the bottle and leave it to chill in the freezer. The damp towel will freeze quickly, and thanks to the frozen towel, the wine will chill in half the time it usually would.

How do you chill wine in 3 minutes?

5 Do’s for Chilling Wine in a Hurry

  1. Submerge It in Salted Ice Water. The fastest way to chill wine is by giving the bottle an ice bath in salted water.
  2. Put It in the Freezer.
  3. Pour It in Wine Glasses and Refrigerate.
  4. Throw in Some Ice Cubes.
  5. Add a Few Frozen Grapes.

Can you chill wine too long?

Then, 30 minutes before you open the bottle, remove it from the fridge and let it warm up ever so slightly. A wine that’s over-chilled results in muted flavors and nobody wants that.

Does freezing wine affect alcohol content?

While popping a bottle of wine in the freezer is really not the best way to cool it down, it’s also not a total catastrophe to end up with frozen wine. The alcohol content won’t be affected and in many cases, neither will the flavor.

Will frozen wine explode?

Frozen wine that bursts through the airtight seal of a screw cap (or pushes a cork out of the bottle) can oxidize if left out for too long. The bottle will actually explode, thanks to the wire cage holding the cork down.

How do you chill wine at 55 degrees?

“It takes a lot to cool down.” One way around that is to pour the actual wine in a Ziploc bag, seal it, and drop that bag into cold ice water—a single glass in a Ziploc bag will take about 2 minutes to reach 50°F.

Should red wine be refrigerated?

Just as you store open white wine in the refrigerator, you should refrigerate red wine after opening. Beware that more subtle red wines, like Pinot Noir, can start turning “flat” or taste less fruit-driven after a few days in the refrigerator.

Should red wine be chilled?

According to wine experts, red wine is best served in the range of 55°F–65°F, even though they say that a room temperature bottle is optimal. When red wine is too cold, its flavor becomes dull. But when red wines are too warm, it becomes overbearing with alcohol flavor.

Can I drink cold wine?

That white wine should be served chilled and red wine at room temperature is essentially correct, but isn’t the whole story. Reds are best served slightly cooler than room temperature. Lighter fruity reds and the rose wines are best served lightly chilled, maybe an hour in the refrigerator.

Is wine better cold or room temp?

Lighter, fruitier wines work best colder, between 45°F and 50°F, or two hours in the fridge. Most Italian whites like Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blanc also fall in that range. Wine should rarely be colder than 45°F, unless they’re porch pounders on a hot day.

How long is red wine good for after opening in the fridge?

An opened bottle of red wine will usually keep well for about 3 to 5 days in the refrigerator (be sure to re-cork it first). If a cork or stopper is not available for the opened bottle of red wine, cover the opening with plastic wrap and place a rubber band around the bottle neck to seal plastic tightly.

At what temperature should you store red wine?

Whether you use a wine cellar, a wine cooler, or a wine refrigerator, the degree spectrum typically stays the same. Generally, if you’re storing wines for any length of time, keep both red and white wines at 55° F, but it all really depends on the varietal.

The Absolute BEST Way to Chill Wine

According to science, it can’t hurt.

Adding Frozen Objects to a Glass of Wine

On the Internet, one suggestion is to keep frozen grapes or special wine cooling cubes in your freezer so that you may drop them into a glass of warm wine without diluting the flavor. According to Blonder and, you know, everyone who has ever handled an ice cube, this is theoretically feasible. However, in practice, it takes a greater level of planning and preparation than, for example, just placing a bottle of wine in the refrigerator right away (the cubes takes about 2-3 hours to chill in the freezer, longer than it takes to chill a bottle).

Is it possible that a wine-chilling cube has chipped a tooth?

Science Says: This is effective, although it appears to be a little absurd.

Submerging the Wine in Ice Water

The suggestion made by both Halpin-Healy and Blonder is also the one that sommeliers in restaurants follow: chilling a bottle of wine in ice water before serving it. Water conducts heat at a rate around 25 times faster than air, making it a more effective thermal conductor. One thing to bear in mind while using this approach is that it is not foolproof. Despite the fact that the majority of champagne sinks and ice buckets are too short and narrow, Chang adds, “everyone, somms included, always neglect to immerse bottles completely.” Therefore, the bottom of the container is virtually frozen while the top is heated.

Another sommelier tip is to cover the bottle tightly in plastic wrap to keep the label from becoming damaged.

He suggests avoiding the salt and simply putting ice water in the lobster pot instead.

Even if you don’t use salt, it should only take approximately 15 minutes.

Removing the Wine from the Bottle

Another factor contributing to the length of time it takes a room-temperature bottle of wine to cool down is the bottle itself. “Glass is a poor thermoconductor,” Blonder explained, pointing out that the bottle can account for up to 40% of the total weight. “It takes a long time for me to calm down.” It’s possible to get around this by pouring the real wine into a Ziploc bag, sealing it, and dropping the bag into a bowl of cold ice water. A single glass of wine in a Ziploc bag will take around 2 minutes to reach 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Then place them in the refrigerator to chill.

The temperature of the wine to begin with (an 80°F bottle will take an additional 30 minutes longer to chill than a 70°F bottle) and whether or not you open the door to fetch cheese or anything else are all factors to consider.

By freezing bottles or filling them with ice water, you are experimenting with extreme temperatures, over-chilling the outside so that it will continue to cool the heated interior once the bottle is removed from the freezer.

(It’s comparable to the carryover effect that occurs when a rib roast is taken from the oven and continues to cook for a further 30 minutes.)

Should you put wine in the freezer? – ask Decanter

For a lightly chilled wine, Matt Walls, Decanter’s Rhône reporter, suggests placing it in the freezer for 22 minutes, and for a thoroughly cold wine, 28 minutes. In this video, Xavier Rousset MS, a sommelier and restaurateur, shares his best method for accelerating the process even further. In a moist towel, wrap the bottle and place it in the freezer for approximately 10 minutes. The most essential thing is to have it in mind at all times. Set a timer on your phone or watch to ensure that you don’t forget about the bottle.

Can you put sparkling wine in the freezer?

Champagne, Prosecco, and Crémant may all be stored in the freezer, but as previously said, they should not be forgotten. Sparkling wines are a little more dangerous than regular wines since they include carbon dioxide, which gives them their bubbles. In order to save time, it’s usually advisable to chill your bottle of Champagne for no more than 20 minutes in the freezer.

When wine is forgotten in the freezer

Every member of theDecanterteam has experienced a wine-related calamity as a result of placing wine in the freezer. In the words of Laura Seal, former content producer at Decanter, “my birthday Laurent-Perrier rosé burst into a million pieces and colored the freezer pink.” The defrosting was necessary in order to get all of the glass out, and a lot of weird food from long-gone housemates appeared as a result. ‘I put a bottle of Champagne in the freezer that had been given to me as an engagement gift with the intention of drinking it that evening with a BBQ,’ recalled James Button, Decanter’s regional editor for Italy.

According to Harry Fawkes, former digital publisher of Decanter, his favorite bottle was a bottle of Freddie Emile from Trimbach in 1997.

Instead, I was served a Riesling and a glass ice lolly.’

Other ways of chilling wine

Freezers offer the advantage of being quick, but if you aren’t in a rush, there are alternative options for chilling your wine:

  • A bucket of ice or an ice bath Fill the bottle halfway with ice cubes and cold water, making sure the bottle is completely immersed. Rousset recommended that you add some salt to the water as well. Remember that ice sleeves are excellent for keeping a wine cool once it has already been cooled – but they are not as effective for trying to cool a whole bottle of wine. It’s wise to have a few in your freezer at all times, ready to use
  • Keeping a few grapes frozen in your freezer will make it easier to snap them into your glass, explains Peter Richards, Master of Wine. They’ll function in the same way that ice cubes do in wine, but without diluting the wine
  • The Kaelo iceless ice bucket may be integrated into your kitchen for those who spend a lot of money.

The first version of this article was published in 2017 and the most recent version was released in June 2021.

Best rosé wines: 20 under £20 to try today

Published originally in 2017, and revised in June 2021, this article has been updated.

The Testing

In order to determine which of these strategies was worth the effort, I chilled nine identical screw-top bottles of white wine using a variety of methods given to me by colleagues, as well as others that I discovered online and one or two that I devised myself. The following are the nine approaches that we put to the test:

  1. Bottle in a metal ice bucket filled with salt, continually stirred
  2. No stirring required for the salty bottle in the metal ice bucket. No salt, no agitation, no shaking of the bottle in the metal ice bucket Bottle in a metal ice bucket with an immersion circulator set to 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees Celsius)
  3. Wine has been put into a gallon-sized zip-lock bag and placed in the freezer
  4. In the freezer, place the bottle horizontally. In the freezer, the bottle is standing erect. a bottle wrapped in a moist towel, standing upright, and placed in the freezer
  5. In the refrigerator, the bottle should be upright.
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I labeled each bottle with the name of the cooling method I would be experimenting with. In an ideal world, we would have used a thermometer to take readings of the temperature of each bottle every five seconds, then graphed the results—but, alas, we don’t have nine of the same thermometer in the Serious Eats test kitchen, and we couldn’t figure out how to put a thermometer in a horizontal bottle of wine, or a zipper-lock bag, without making a huge mess. As a consequence, I opted on taking the temperature of the wine every five minutes, with the aid of Niki, even if it did not provide perfectly ideal results.

Whenever the timer went off, we ran about the kitchen, taking as many temperature measures as we could as soon as we could get them done.

Despite the fact that several approaches achieved outcomes at a similar pace, the optimal method stood out head and shoulders above the others.

The Results

  1. Bottle in a metal ice bucket with salt, continually agitated: 5 minutes
  2. Bottle in a metal ice bucket with salt, not agitated: 11 minutes
  3. Bottle in a metal ice bucket with salt, not agitated: 5 minutes
  4. In 15 minutes, a bottle in a metal ice bucket without salt and without being stirred (tied for third quickest)
  5. In 15 minutes, a bottle in a metal ice bucket with an immersion circulator set to 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees Celsius) matched for third quickest time
  6. Pour the wine into a gallon-sized zipper-lock bag and place it in the freezer for 50 minutes. 60 minutes in the freezer with the bottle resting horizontally
  7. Bottle in freezer, standing upright: 85 minutes
  8. Bottle in freezer, lying down: 85 minutes Bottle wrapped with a moist towel, standing upright, and placed in the refrigerator: We stopped taking temperature observations after 85 minutes, at which point the wine was still 49 degrees Fahrenheit (9 degrees Celsius). Using a bottle standing upright in the refrigerator, we took temperature readings for 85 minutes, at which point the wine was still 59 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees Celsius)

A excellent reason why your sommelier places your bottle of white wine in an ice bucket after pouring your first glass is to keep the wine cool. With a large enough container and enough ice, you can completely surround your wine with icy-cold water, which will always chill it more quickly than cold air. Instead of using an ice bucket (or any equally sized container), you may place your wine in the freezer instead. In addition, unless you’re able to discover a single square inch of additional space in there, turn your wine bottle on its side: The increased surface area of the bottle that comes into touch with the cold surface of your freezer shelf results in significantly quicker chilling than placing a bottle upright to chill.

A bottle of wine was also covered in a moist cloth before being placed upright in the freezer, however this procedure actually seemed to insulate the bottle, causing it to chill more slowly than the bottle that had not been wrapped in a cloth.

The Absolute Best Way to Chill Wine: Spin the Bottle, in a Salted Ice Bath

It took an hour or more for the bottles of wine that I placed in the freezer to achieve the desired serving temperature, but the bottle cooled in a salted, stirred ice bath was ready to drink in less than five minutes. In an ice bucket—well, technically the bowl of a stand mixer; work with what you’ve got, people—I put four pounds of ice, two cups of salt, and enough water to fill the bottle of wine until it reached the neck of the bottle. In addition, water is an excellent conductor of heat and so produces more points of contact between the bottle and the cooling solution than would be provided by a bucket of ice without any additional water.

  1. Every few minutes, I gently pulled the bottle out of the water and used it to swirl the mixture before lowering it back into the bowl of water.
  2. During the first minute, the temperature decreased by 10 degrees Fahrenheit, and then by almost 10 degrees Fahrenheit every succeeding minute until it was safe to drink.
  3. Do you prefer your wine a little colder?
  4. A bath constructed entirely of ice and water will not drop below 32°F (0°C), which is the natural freezing point of water.
  5. In the meanwhile, if you’re in a rush to open a cold bottle and want to speed up the procedure, wouldn’t it be fantastic if you could keep your ice bath temperature below 32 degrees Fahrenheit?
  6. A mechanism known as “freezing-point depression” allows salt to reduce the freezing point of water, which implies that salt water may be much colder than 32°F while still remaining liquid.
  7. The wine in the unsalted (and un-agitated) ice bath took 15 minutes to cool down, but the wine in the stirred, salted ice bath was ready to drink in five minutes flat, proving that less is more when it comes to wine cooling.
  8. I used two buckets of salted ice water to compare the temperatures of two bottles of wine, spinning one bottle gently but frequently while letting the other bottle to cool undisturbed.
  9. As previously stated, the temperature of the agitated bottle decreased by around 10 degrees in the first minute, whereas the temperature of the unagitated bottle dropped by approximately seven degrees in the same period.
  10. In addition to helping to push away the water that had been warmed by the room-temperature bottle, agitating the bottle also redistributed the wine in the bottle, allowing the warmer liquid in the center of the bottle to flow closer to the drinking glass.

If you have a large enough vessel, ice, salt, and water—as well as a little patience for spinning your bottle—this approach is your best option for a successful outcome.

Successful but Slower Methods: Stagnant Salted and Unsalted Ice Baths

Even if you don’t have the time or patience to stir your wine, merely submerging the bottle in a bucket of salted ice water for 10 minutes can get it up to 45°F in under an hour. Unless you have an urgent need to start drinking right away —and we won’t criticize you!—this is still a pretty reasonable turnaround time. Instead of using salt, an ice bucket that hasn’t been salted will bring your wine down to serving temperature in 15 minutes.

Can a Sous Vide Machine Help You Chill a Bottle of Wine?

If we didn’t figure out a method to integrate an immersion circulator into this test, it wouldn’t be considered a Serious Eats test. A circulator, while it does not have the capacity to chill down water, it does give continual agitation, similar to what my hand bottle-spinning provided. That the circulator would also assist in ensuring that the bottle received a consistent supply of the coldest ice water in the bowl was my objective, as well. As a test, we attached a circulator to the edge of a bucket of ice water and set it to 45°F (7°C), allowing the machine to circulate the cold water surrounding a bottle of wine while we tasted it.

However, it did not surpass the traditional, unplugged approach of a good old ice bath.

Once the wine had been submerged in the sous vide ice bath for 50 minutes, the temperature of the wine began to drop.

Unless you have a strong desire to show off your sous vide circulator at all times, there is no reason to bring it out for the sole purpose of chilling wine.

If You Don’t Have Ice, but Do Have a Freezer: Lay It Down (With or Without a Freezer Bag)

Putting an entire bottle of wine into a double layer of gallon-sized plastic zipper-lock bags and storing it in the freezer was the least complicated—and certainly the least sophisticated-looking—method we tried. Laying it down on its side increased the surface area of the bag, which allowed the wine to chill slightly more quickly than if the bottle had been placed on its side in the freezer. The temperature of our bag of wine reached 45°F after 50 minutes. However, at the moment, a bottle of wine resting on its side in the freezer was just three degrees warmer than the surrounding air.

If you’re not using an ice bucket and instead opting for the freezer approach, simply putting your bottle on its side for an hour will get it to the correct temperature.

The Methods That Will Keep You Waiting

Putting an entire bottle of wine into a double layer of gallon-sized plastic zipper-lock bags and storing it in the freezer was the least complicated—and certainly the least sophisticated-looking—method we found. It was easier to cool the wine by laying it on its side in the freezer, since it had more surface area. This was somewhat faster than if the bottle had been placed on its side. Our bag of wine reached 45°F after 50 minutes in the oven. However, at the time, a bottle of wine lying on its side in the freezer was just three degrees warmer.

Unless you’re in a dire situation, there’s no reason to resort to the bag technique of cleaning. Instead of using an ice bucket and instead opting for the freezer approach, simply placing your bottle on its side will get it to the proper temperature in about an hour.

5 ways to chill the wine! Can You Put Wine in The Freezer?

| BE THE FIRST TO COMMENT ON JUNE 20, 2017 |

In most supermarkets and wine shops, you’ll find bottles of wine laid out on a room temperature which enables you to drink them right away. We explored what are the quickest ways for chilling your favorite bottle, right after you purchased it!

Although you would think of using a refrigerator or freezer first, the ice bucket filled with water is the most effective traditional method of immediately cooling down a bottle. Don’t forget that water is essential in this situation. A bottle of water sitting in ice will cool extremely slowly. Because the water completely covers the bottles in ice, it is more efficient at chilling.

  • Red wine takes around 10 minutes
  • White and rose wines take approximately 20 minutes.

Red wine takes around 10 minutes; white and rose wines take approximately 20 minutes; and sparkling wine takes approximately 30 minutes.

The freezer comes second in chilling the wine

It’s fine to keep the wine chilled in the freezer; just make sure you remember to take it out! Here’s when you should put the bottle in the freezer to avoid spoiling it.

  • Red wine takes around 40 minutes
  • White and rose wines take approximately 1 hour.

Don’t forget to take it out of the freezer before you serve it! Keep in mind that wine is mostly composed of water. Because of the alcohol level, the freezing temperature is reduced, although wine can still freeze due to the low freezing temperature. This has the potential to change the tastes and aromas of the wine. This is where you store the bottles, not where you swiftly cold them.

Slowest method for chilling wine in the refrigerator

But, on the other hand, it makes it easier for the wine to cool down. You are aware that it is usually a good idea to keep a few bottles of wine, particularly sparkling or sweet, in the refrigerator. You never know when you could find yourself in need of it. If you forget to put your wine in the refrigerator, the good news is that it will still be at an acceptable temperature (with the exception of reds) the next day.

  • The wine, on the other hand, is able to cool down quickly as a result. Having a few bottles of wine, particularly sparkling or sweet, in the refrigerator is a fantastic idea, as you probably already know! When it comes to money, you never know when you’ll need it. If you forget to put your wine in the refrigerator, the good news is that it will still be at an acceptable temperature (with the exception of red wines) the next day.

If you don’t have time to freeze the wine, some people recommend adding frozen grapes to chill it and then drinking it.

Adding frozen grapes to chill the wine

We wouldn’t recommend adding anything to a glass of wine, but if you’re in a rush and don’t have much time left, frozen grapes sound like a good idea. They won’t melt and dilute the wine, which is a bonus. Place the remainder of the bottle to cool in one of the methods we indicated above to make it ready for a subsequent refill. Tip: You might also use stainless steel ice cubes, which are specifically designed for cooling beverages. They are reusable, and you can purchase them on the internet.

Brilliant new ideas: The “Tea Bag” 3-minute method

We discovered some brilliant new ideas for chilling wine while browsing the internet. One that we learned about through the wine blog The Wine Wankers is this one. They call it the teabag technique, and they claim that you may have your wine ready for serving in only three minutes. During the hot summer months, this can be life-saving. This is something we want to do! Now that you’ve learned how to properly chill your wine, we’ve added some fantastic new wines to our wine collection. Choose anything you like, and we’ll have it delivered to you within 5 working days!

How to Quickly Chill Wine: 8 Hacks for Cooling Down That Bottle

You may enjoy wine, but chances are you do not have a wine refrigerator that is dedicated to maintaining the right wine temperature at all times. (Become a member of the club.) It is possible that you may be seeking for techniques to have your wine cold quickly as a result. Perhaps you’re hosting a wine tasting party, but you’ve found yourself with less than an hour to bring the wine to the proper serving temperature. Or perhaps you’ve had a hard day and are in desperate need of a chilled glass of rosé.

We’ve got you covered. The ways we’ll teach you in this tutorial will allow you to chill wine quickly and efficiently, as well as a few typical methods you’ll want to avoid. But first, let’s go over some of the fundamentals of drinking wine at the appropriate serving temperature.

A Quick Word About Wine Temperature

Serving wine at room temperature may come as a surprise to some, but it is not recommended. (This includes the colors red and orange.) While this is true for most wines, it is not always the case for roses, white wines, and sparkling wines to be served at room temperature. The aromas and acidity of lighter wines are enhanced by chilling them; however, over-chilling can dull the tastes of darker wines. Serving red wine too cold will result in an overly acidic flavor, especially if it is a young wine.

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5 Do’s for Chilling Wine in a Hurry

While it is always preferable to plan ahead of time, life has a way of throwing us a curveball. So, if you’re in a hurry, here are five simple techniques that can help your wine (and you) cool out in no time.

1. Submerge It in Salted Ice Water

Giving a bottle of wine an ice bath in salted water is the most efficient method of chilling it. (And we’re not talking about adding salt water from the ocean — we’re talking about adding conventional table salt to water.) To refresh your memory, salt lowers the freezing point of water (this is referred to as “freezing point depression”), allowing it to be kept at temperatures lower than 32 degrees Fahrenheit without freezing. (Many thanks to science for this.) You’ll need an ice bucket, wine bucket, or any other container large enough to hold the full wine bottle in order for this procedure to be effective.

  • (It’s already beginning to sound like a party!) After that, you’ll fill the container halfway with water and add the salt to taste.
  • Some people believe that a few teaspoons of salt is adequate, but such a little amount will have little effect on the temperature of the ice bath, which will remain relatively constant.
  • Then pile on the ice cubes until the glass is full.
  • Your wine will be ready in 15 minutes or less, depending on how fast you cook.
  • It’s best not to try this with Champagne or other sparkling wines, otherwise you’ll wind up with a potentially explosive situation.

2. Put It in the Freezer

Although it is not the most expedient method of obtaining a chilled bottle of Chardonnay or sparkling brut, placing your bottle of wine in the freezer will do the task. The trick to making the freezer option work for you is to turn your wine bottle on its side before putting it in the freezer. Why? The additional surface area that comes into contact with the cold surface area of your freezer will allow it to cool much more quickly than simply placing it upright will allow it to cool. Also, there’s a strong probability your freezer won’t be able to accommodate an upright wine glass.) Make careful you set a timer for 30 minutes to an hour to ensure that the bottle reaches the appropriate temperature and avoid it from cracking or bursting.

Pro tip: Even if you’re not cooling the wine, storing it horizontally is the best option. This is especially true for wine bottles with corks, as the cork helps to preserve moisture in the bottle, prevent drying, and prevent the wine from becoming bad.

3. Pour It in Wine Glasses and Refrigerate

This technique of chilling needs you to first open the wine bottle, so if you don’t mind doing so, it might be a good option for you. Simply pour the wine into a wine glass and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap before storing it in the refrigerator to seal in the aromas, limit oxidation, and keep away any unwanted fridge visitors. Because a wine glass is much thinner (and hence smaller) than a bottle of wine, it will cool much more quickly. In this situation, it implies that your wine will be ready in around 30 minutes, rather than the typical 90 minutes it would take to cool a full bottle in the refrigerator.

Not only will this prevent the glasses from shifting and perhaps spilling, but it will also assist in better temperature regulation (particularly if you’re opening and closing the refrigerator regularly).

4. Throw in Some Ice Cubes

We’ll be the first to confess that this is a flagrant violation of basic wine etiquette. However, when you’re seeking for quick answers on how to quickly cool wine, it’s okay to add one or two ice cubes to your glass of wine if that’s what it takes. (After all, some rules are designed to be violated. In addition, when it comes to savoring a glass of wine, you’ll go to whatever lengths necessary. You may only want to use this approach for rosés or unoaked white wines that won’t taste unpleasant when somewhat watered down, because ice cubes melt and dilute the wine.

Having said that, they won’t keep your wine cold indefinitely, so make sure you have enough cubes to keep your wine properly chilled.

5. Add a Few Frozen Grapes

Frozen grapes, which are a superior alternative to ice cubes, are a practical and visually beautiful way to cool wine in a couple of minutes. In addition to the fact that they will not dilute your wine, you will also be able to consume them for a tiny burst of sweetness. Choosing grapes that complement the sort of wine you’re drinking or serving (red grapes for red wine, green grapes for white wine) is a good idea. If feasible, use organic grapes to reduce pesticide residue.

3 Don’ts of How to Quickly Chill Wine

These methods are frequently hailed as excellent ways to cool wine in a hurry, but we believe they are ineffective. The reason behind this is as follows.

  • Wrapping your wine bottle with a dish towel (or paper towels) and storing it in the freezer will not speed up the chilling process, contrary to common belief. Instead, it will prolong the cooling process. In reality, it has the inverse effect. Wrapping the bottle protects it from the freezing temperatures of the freezer, allowing it to chill for a longer period of time. In the wine world, these gadgets are similar to a freezer stick for your glass of vino. Having opened the bottle and poured the first glass, you insert the spout and serve the rest of the drink to your guests. However, because these sticks must be stored in the freezer at least two hours before use, they contradict the aim of completing the task in a timely manner. Wine glasses that have been chilled: Pouring room-temperature wine into cold wine glasses is a valid alternative for cooling your drink, according to information you may have discovered online. While this is a good concept in general, it will not result in a significant temperature differential and will not be particularly useful if you need to cool numerous bottles of wine
  • Nonetheless,

Chill Out, You Got This

There are a plethora of methods for expediting the wine-chilling process, some of which are beneficial and others which are best avoided. There’s no need to worry about getting your wine cold quickly, no matter what sort you’re serving. Don’t forget to check out our Unusual Wines blog for additional suggestions on how to make the most of your wine-drinking experience.

How to Chill Wine

While there are a variety of methods for expediting the wine-chilling process, some are beneficial while others should be avoided.

There is a quick and easy way to chill any sort of wine, no matter what you’re serving. Take a look at our Unusual Wines blog for additional suggestions on how to make the most of your wine-drinking experience.

White Wines

There are a plethora of methods for expediting the wine-chilling process, some of which are beneficial and others that are best avoided. There is a quick and easy way to chill any sort of wine, no matter what it is. Don’t forget to check out our Unusual Wines blog for additional tips on how to make the most of your wine-drinking experience.

Red Wines

There are a plethora of methods for expediting the wine-chilling process, some of which are beneficial and others which are best avoided. No matter what sort of wine you’re serving, you can get it cold in a jiffy. Visit our Unusual Wines blog for additional suggestions on how to make the most of your wine-drinking experience.

Tips for Chilling Wine Quickly

There are a few effective methods for swiftly chilling your wine. The first thing you should do is soak the wine in cold water. Sommeliers like to use this procedure because it is more precise. You should not use solely ice; instead, you should use a 50/50 mix of ice and water to achieve the best results. Add a handful of kosher salt to your ice bath to further reduce the temperature of the water in it. In addition, be certain that the bottle is entirely immersed; otherwise, the first glass will be warm while the remainder of the bottle would be cold.

  1. You might also use your freezer, but be sure to wrap the bottle with a damp tea towel first before putting it in the freezer.
  2. Another option is to place a cooling rod into the bottle, which is far more efficient.
  3. Finally, but certainly not least, you may refrigerate your wine right before serving it.
  4. Many people swear by the method of putting a glass of wine into a zip-top bag and refrigerating it in this manner.
  5. To cool the wine without diluting it, store frozen grapes in your freezer and plop a few of those into the glass.

Chill Wine in a Flash With This Super-Quick Restaurant Trick

The following are some effective methods for quickly chilling your wine. Submerging the wine in cold water is your initial course of action. Sommeliers like to use this approach since it is the most accurate. You should not use solely ice; instead, you should use a 50/50 mixture of ice and water. In order to reduce the temperature of your ice bath even further, add a handful of kosher salt. In addition, be certain that the bottle is entirely immersed; otherwise, the first glass will be warm while the remainder of the bottle would be chilly.

  1. You may also use your freezer, but be sure to wrap the bottle with a damp tea towel first before putting it in the freezer.
  2. To cool a bottle quickly, another option is to use a chilling rod.
  3. In addition, you may cool your wine right before serving it to your guests.
  4. The practice of placing a glass of wine into a zip-top bag and refrigerating it is widely practiced by many.

The temptation to add ice cubes to your glass should be resisted; doing so will dilute the wine. In its place, consider keeping frozen grapes in the freezer and tossing a few of those into the glass; they will cool the wine without diluting it.

How To Chill Wine in the Freezer

What you’ll need is the following:

  • Bottle of wine or sparkling wine
  • A paper towel
  • Water
  • A freezer

Step 1: Wrap wine bottle in a damp paper towel

Bottle of champagne, wrapped in a moist paper towel, ready to serve Photograph courtesy of Diana Moutsopoulos Wet the paper towel with cool water, squeezing off any excess water, and set it aside to dry. Wrap it around the wine bottle from top to bottom, making sure that it covers every inch of the bottle. It’s possible that you’ll need two to three sheets of paper towel.

Step 2: Place wine bottle in freezer

The champagne bottle should be placed carefully in your freezer wherever there is available space. Image courtesy of Diana Moutsopoulos. It may be positioned on its side or upright, depending on how much space you have available. Leave it for at least 15 minutes before moving on.

Step 3: Remove towel and enjoy!

Champagne bottle after it has been chilled in the freezer Photograph courtesy of Diana Moutsopoulos When your wine or champagne bottle has been chilled in the freezer for 15 to 20 minutes, it should be very chilly to the touch. It’s time to take the bottle out of the box and enjoy it! If you’re not sure, or if you have the time, you may leave it in for another 5 to 10 minutes. Just make sure you set a timer on your phone so you don’t forget to do it. Related:

7 Ways to Quickly Chill a Bottle of Wine

Is there anything you can do when you’re in desperate need of a chilled Riesling or Beaujolaisnow but all of your bottles are at room temperature? If you’ve ever found yourself in this predicament, you’ll understand why knowing the techniques to cooling wine rapidly are essential. You are not permitted to put ice in your glass since it would dilute the wine. Furthermore, you cannot place the bottle directly into the freezer since it would most likely explode. The good news is that You can acquire an ice-cold Chardonnay in a couple of minutes if you use a more practical method.

1. Submerge the wine bottle in a bucket filled with ice water and salt.

Make an ice bucket for your bottle, but make sure to include one important ingredient: salt! The addition of salt lowers the freezing temperature of water, allowing it to freeze your wine more quickly.

Fenton Graphite and Wood Ice Bucket

Not only are frozen grapes a delicious snack, but they’re also a terrific method to cool wine when you’re entertaining. Simply drop your frozengrapesinto your glass—they’ll behave exactly like ice cubes, only you won’t wind up with a glass of watered-down wine.

3. Use chilled metal wine stones in your wine glass.

Wine Pearls are hand-polished stainless steel “pearls” that contain a freezing gel, which helps to fast cold your glass of wine without diluting it. Wine Pearls are available in a variety of colors and sizes. Your wine will stay cool for up to an hour if you use Wine Pearls.

4. Wrap the wine bottle in a damp towel, then place it in the freezer.

Wine Pearls are hand-polished stainless steel “pearls” that contain a freezing gel, which acts to fast cold your glass of wine without diluting it in the process. Wine Pearls are available in a variety of colors. Your wine will stay cool for up to an hour when using Wine Pearls.

5. Use a chilled wine bottle spout that cools the wine as you pour.

An attachment that may be attached to the top of a wine bottle or decanter is called a Ravi. Ravi chills the wine as it is poured through the spout, and it does so almost immediately.

Ravi Instant Wine Chiller

Corksicle made of stainless steel that reaches all the way to the bottom of your bottle, cooling it swiftly all the way through.

Replace the wine cork with a Corksicle and you’ll be on your way to drinking ice cold wine in no time! The best part is that you don’t even have to uncork it since the Corksicle has a spout that allows you to pour through it while it’s still inside the bottle.

7. Consider a wine fridge for the future.

Corksicle made of stainless steel that reaches all the way to the bottom of your bottle, swiftly cooling it throughout. Change out the wine cork for a Corksicle, and you’ll be on your way to enjoying ice cold wine in no time. The best part is that you don’t even have to uncork it since the Corksicle has a spout that allows you to pour through it even while it’s still inside the bottle!

Ivation 18 Bottle Wine Cellar

This is our top recommendation for the finest wine refrigerator on a tight budget. Here are 31 different ways to enjoy that ice-cold glass of wine:

The Do’s and Don’ts of Chilling Wine

Sometimes, what appears to be a straightforward goal ends up necessitating a more complicated method. Wine cooling isn’t one of those things, fortunately. Follow a few simple recommendations, and you’ll be sipping your beverage at the perfect temperature in no time. Because of the differences in chemical makeup across wines, not all wines should be refrigerated to the same temperature. Acidity is the foundation of a white wine’s flavor. The tannins in ared contribute to the overall structure of the plant.

  1. Sparkling helps to keep carbon dioxide in check (CO 2).
  2. As a result, depending on the components in the wine, temperature can either mute or emphasize the flavor.
  3. Red and fortified wines from the Getty Estate: While things are changing, popular knowledge used to be that red wines should be served at room temperature.
  4. A steamy studio at 12 o’clock in the afternoon in August?
  5. It is no longer relevant to use the room temperature argument, unless you reside in a European castle where your boudoir is kept cool all year.
  6. Lower temperatures are preferred by lighter-bodied wines with more acidity, such as Loire Valley Cabernet Franc.
  7. Full-bodied, tannic wines such as Bordeaux and Napa Cabernet Sauvignon taste better when served slightly chilled, so store them in the fridge for no more than 45 minutes.
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Like Goldilocks, finding the sweet spot in the middle is ideal.

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Policy Regarding Personal Information White, rosé, and sparkling wines are available.

Flavors are subdued when they are served too cold, on the other hand.

Sauternes and other dessert wines are included in this category.

The majority of Italian white wines, such as Pinot Grigio andSauvignon Blanc, belong within this category.

In order for sparklers to work well, they must be between 40°F and 50°F in temperature since CO 2 is better contained in cooler liquids.

Due to the richness and weight of vintage and prestige cuvée Champagnes, they can be served at the upper end of the price spectrum. Prosecco or other light-bodied fruity sparklers are preferable at the lower end of the price spectrum. Getty

How to Chill Wine

Preparation in Advance. This guideline may be applied to nearly anything in one’s life. Place the reds and whites in the refrigerator and take them out an hour or two before supper time. The recommended temperature range for a refrigerator is between 35°F and 40°F, depending on the model. If you have chilly places in your house that always freeze your lettuce, at the very least they will chill your wine more quickly. In terms of time, leaving bottles to chill in the door will not make a difference, but if you open the door frequently, place bottles further back on a shelf or in the crisper bins to save space.

  1. It’s something we’ve all done.
  2. While quality may not be compromised at such high temperatures, the likelihood of a shambles increases.
  3. This allows for the escape of oxygen, which in turn begins the clock on oxidative stress.
  4. The Fastest and Most Effective Way to Chill Wine.
  5. No, you are not allowed to take grandma’s Epsom salts.
  6. Fill a bucket or container with salt, water, and ice, and set it aside.
  7. The addition of salt lowers the freezing point of water below 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

Alternative Methods of Cooling.

Singles can be chilled with the help of a freezer sleeve that has been placed in the freezer.

Because of its lesser bulk, it takes less time to cool than a full bottle of wine would.

Of course, you may also store enough in the freezer to make several glasses at a time.

A chilly stem glass, in contrast to a big frosty mug, does not have the bulk or surface area to significantly reduce the temperature of your wine.

Finally, the internet will advise you to pour the wine into a resealable plastic bag and place it in a container filled with ice water.

How to chill a bottle of wine in just minutes (seriously)

One of your friends has generously brought a bottle of champagne or wine to your New Year’s Eve celebration. What exactly is the problem? It’s nice and toasty. It’s as if your inner Veruca Salt is shouting, “I want my wine — and I want it right now!” Avoid panicking and instead place the bottle in your freezer for the next 45 minutes.

We’ve come up with a better solution. When it comes to getting that bottle of wine cold and in your wine glass or on the table, Jeff Rossen of NBC News National Investigative Correspondent and presenter of Rossen Reports offers two too-good-to-be-true tactics.

The Paper Towel Method

How long do you think it will take? The process takes 15 to 20 minutes.Step 1: Take a couple sheets of paper towels and run them through some water.Step 2: Shake off any excess water and wrap the towels around the bottle.Step 3: Place the bottle in the freezer for 15 to 20 minutes and, voila, you have a wonderfully chilled bottle!

The Ice Bath Method

How long do you think it will take? Two minutes are allotted (seriously) Step 1: Prepare an ice bath in a bucket by filling it halfway with water and ice. Adding two teaspoons of salt to the ice bath and stirring it around is the second step. Step 3: Submerge the bottle in the ice bath for two minutes, and your wine will be cooled! You might wonder what precisely is going on here. In effect, the salt causes a chemical reaction that lowers the freezing point of the ice water, allowing the wine to cool more quickly than usual.

For more advice like this, check out Jeff’s upcoming book, ‘Rossen to the Rescue,’ which you can pre-order here.

A Guide to Chilling Your Red Wine

We independently choose these items, and if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links, we may receive a commission. Even if it’s summer and you don’t have air conditioning, there’s no law that says you can’t drink your red wine chilled to its tannic bones at refrigerator temperature (about 40°F), or that drinking red wine at room temperature is any less enjoyable. Having said that, there is an optimal temperature for drinking red wine, and for most people, that temperature is cellar temperature, which is between 55°F and 60°F.

As a result, what is the best way to produce a temperature that is neither too hot nor too chilly, but just right?

Rule1: Stick It in the Fridge

The quickest and most convenient approach to bring out the best in red wines at home is to place them in the refrigerator before serving. It doesn’t take long to transform reds from hot to subtle, fragrant perfection in a refrigerator that is just 40 degrees Fahrenheit on average. For the majority of wines, one hour in the fridge or 15 minutes in the freezer will transform them from room temperature to cellar temperature perfection. In the event that you overchill your wine, don’t fret: “Set the wine out in a dark, cool spot to let it to warm up gradually,” says Jienna Basaldu, wine director of Sacramento’s Sutter Club, who also advises not exposing it to direct sunlight or heat, which can cause it to lose its flavor.

Are you prepared to take that next step?

Rule2: Not All Red Wines Are Created Equal

While it is true that most red wines are happiest and tastiest when served at cellar temperature, certain wines like to be served slightly warmer or cooler depending on the variety. Bold reds such as Zinfandel and Cabernet Sauvignon are at their finest when stored at the ideal cellar temperature. If you keep them in the fridge for an extended period of time, their hard tannins will tighten. Light-bodied reds, on the other hand, may withstand extended storage in the refrigerator. “Reds with low tannin content, such as Chinon, Beaujolais, and Red Burgundy, are just a few of the reds I enjoy drinking slightly chilled,” Basaldu explains.

Pinot Noir, Dolcetto, and Schiava are three additional reds that should be served at a temperature that is somewhat colder than cellar temperature.

Rule3: Keep the Chill Going

It is important to keep your red wine at the proper temperature once it has been brought to the proper temperature, which may be difficult in the summer – especially if you are drinking it outside. You may serve it in an ice-cold glass like you would for a beer, or you can add an ice cube or whiskey stone to your drink. In addition, pouring your favorite red wine over a large mound of ice is not considered sacrilege. If that appeals to you, go ahead and do it. Do you have any other suggestions for obtaining wine temperature nirvana?

Please share your thoughts in the comments section!

Laura is a Certified Sommelier who relocated from New York City to the foothills of California’s Sierra Nevada, where she writes and dabbles in winemaking.

VinePair, Palate Press, and Laura Uncorked are all good places to find her (mis)adventures.

We Tested 6 Different Methods for Quickly Chilling a Bottle of Wine — And the Winner Only Took 15 Minutes

We independently choose these items, and if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links, we may receive a commission. The process of chilling a bottle of wine isn’t difficult, so long as you remember to place it in the refrigerator ahead of time. However, things do happen (read: We forget, or we run out of fridge space). What happens after that? In such case, you’ll need to refrigerate a bottle of wine that’s been sitting about at room temperature for a while. That’s where this piece, as well as me, come in.

Take a look at this and keep it in mind the next time you’re in a bind.

How I Tested the Different Methods

I started with six bottles of wine that were at room temperature (69°F), set up the procedures, and measured the wine’s temperature every five minutes for the first hour. When the wine reached the desired temperature (45°F, which is a properly cooled drinking temperature), or when it looked that the temperature was no longer decreasing, I stopped taking its temperature. The results are as follows: All of the methods were given an overall rating, with 1 being the least liked and 5 being the most favorite of mine.

Continue reading because, in addition to the rating, you’ll discover more extensive remarks.

Wine-Chilling Method: Corkcicle Air

  • 5 for ease
  • 3 for cost (theCorkcicle Aircosts $24.95)
  • 0 for speed (at 67°F after 80 minutes)
  • 2 for overall rating.

This is how it works: To use the Corkcicle Air, just freeze the liquid-filled wand for at least 90 minutes before placing the wand into a glass of wine when you’re ready to use it. It is vital to pour out some wine before using the Air since the wine will overflow if you try to use the Air with a full bottle. The outcomes were as follows: The Air was unable to significantly reduce the temperature of the room-temperature wine, with the thermometer reading 67°F after 80 minutes. To be fair, this device isn’t intended to reduce the temperature of wine by tens of degrees.

It also has another interesting feature: A part of its top detaches, revealing a spout beneath it.

Is it possible that I will use this equipment to fast cool a bottle?

No. I’m keeping it in my freezer, though, for the purpose for which it was originally intended: ice cream (chilling reds and maintaining temps of cold bottles). Photo courtesy of Joe Lingeman; prop styling courtesy of Jesse Szewczyk

Wine-Chilling Method: Vacu Vin Cooler

  • Speed 1 (at 54°F after 80 minutes)
  • Ease 5
  • Price 3 (theVacu Vin Cooler costs $22.87)
  • Rating 2.5
  • Ease 5 (at 54°F after 80 minutes)

Five stars for ease; three stars for price ($22.87 for theVacu Vin Cooler); one star for speed (it reached 54°F after 80 minutes); two stars for overall rating; and two stars for overall rating.

Wine-Chilling Method: Damp Towel

  • Effortless: 5, cost-effectiveness: 5, speed: 2 (at 49°F after 80 minutes), and rating: 3.

Effortless: 5, cost-effectiveness: 5, speed: 2 (at 49°F after 80 minutes), and rating: 3

Wine-Chilling Method: Zip-Top Bag

It was done in the following manner: I placed one whole gallon-sized zip-top bag filled with room temperature wine on a quarter-sheet pan and placed it in the freezer for 30 minutes. The outcomes were as follows: After 10 minutes, the temperature of the wine had dropped to 55°F, and after 20 minutes, it had dropped to 42°F. This method is effective if you need to fast cool a bottle. However, you will be confronted with the question of how to properly serve this newly chilled wine. I grabbed the wine baggie and emptied it into a carafe using a funnel I’d made earlier on.

Photo courtesy of Joe Lingeman; prop styling courtesy of Jesse Szewczyk

Wine-Chilling Method: Ice Water

  • It was done in the following manner: I placed one whole gallon-sized zip-top bag filled with room temperature wine on a quarter-sheet pan and left it in the freezer for several hours. Following are the outcomes: It was 55 degrees Fahrenheit after 10 minutes and 42 degrees Fahrenheit at the end of twenty minutes. A bottle of wine may be chilled in under five minutes by following these instructions. When it comes to serving this newly cooled wine, however, there is some confusion. When I finished with the wine bags, I funneled the liquid into a carafe with a funnel. The fact that it’s an extra step and requires the use of a plastic bag isn’t difficult to understand. Prop styling by Jesse Szewczyk and photography by Joe Lingeman

The Procedure: I filled an ice bucket halfway with ice and then added enough cold water to ensure that the bottle of wine was almost completely buried in the water. When I was waiting for the wine to cool down, I periodically picked the bottle up and stirred it in the ice bath before lowering it back down again. Although somewhat more time-consuming than the previous procedure, there was no need to decant the wine into or out of a plastic bag using this method. It’s a victory! Photo courtesy of Joe Lingeman; prop styling courtesy of Jesse Szewczyk

Wine-Chilling Method: Ice Water + Salt

  • Simpleness: 4.5
  • Cost: 5 (assuming you already have an ice bucket or something large like a cambroor even a stand mixer bowl, as well as enough ice and salt on hand)
  • (After 15 minutes, the temperature had reached 45°F.) 5 out of 5 stars

The procedure was as follows: I filled an ice bucket halfway with ice and added enough cold water to guarantee that the bottle of wine would be almost completely covered, then added two cups of salt and stirred well. The outcomes were as follows: This was, without a doubt, the quickest of the available options. In order to keep the wine chilled, I occasionally picked the bottle up, stirred the ice bath, then placed it back down while I waited for it to cool. After just 15 minutes, the wine had reached the optimum serving temperature.

When you add salt to water, it decreases the freezing point of the water, which implies that salty ice water grows colder faster than conventional ice water.

Do you have a preferred way of chilling wine that you use?

Riddley Gemperlein-Schirm is a Lifestyle Editor and a developer of tools.

She has worked for companies such as America’s Test Kitchen, EatingWell, and Food52 as a professional kitchen equipment tester.

What she wants is to identify the greatest kitchen equipment for you so that you don’t waste time or money on anything else. She currently resides in Boston, Massachusetts, with her two dogs. FollowRiddley

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